What Makes a Place Special

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APPENDIX R Exemplar Unit of Work: Foundation Stage - What makes a place special? This unit of work contributes towards the principal aim of RE in Wiltshire:

to engage children in enquiry into key questions arising from a study of religion and belief, so as to promote their personal and spiritual development.

Step 1: Theme

Special places

Step 2: Key question

What makes a place special? Where does this fit into our Key Stage planning? This unit will fit into a study of places that are special to the children such as home or school. This unit builds on what children are learning in the wider foundation stage curriculum, it is „early RE‟ and prepares children for learning in key stage one by introducing the style and simple vocabulary of RE.

Step 3: Learning outcomes and assessment

RE learning outcomes talk about somewhere that is special to themselves saying why; be aware that some religious people have places which have special meaning for them; get to know and use appropriate words to talk about their thoughts and feelings when visiting a church; express a personal response to the natural world Some relevant Early Learning Goals: PSED 6 Have a developing respect for their own cultures and beliefs and those of other people. PSED 13 Understand that people have different needs, views, cultures and beliefs which need to be treated with respect. PSED 14 Understand that they can expect others to treat their needs, views, cultures and beliefs with respect. PSED 4 Respond to significant experiences, showing a range of feelings when appropriate. CLL 4 Listen with enjoyment and respond to stories, songs and other music, rhymes and poems and make up their own stories, songs, rhymes and poems. CLL 7 Use language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences.

Step 4: Content Step 5: Teaching and learning activities

L1 statements might include I can talk about what I find interesting or puzzling about a church I can talk about my own special place and say how it makes me feel I can say the names of different parts of the church. I can recognise and name some symbols in a church, such as a cross why some places are special and what makes them special; the church building as a special place for Christians; Develop active learning opportunities and investigations, using some engaging stimuli, to enable children to achieve the outcomes. Don‟t forget the skills you want children to develop. Make sure that the activities allow children to practise these skills.

Wiltshire Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2011 – Appendix F

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APPENDIX R

Key question: What makes a place special? Learning outcomes Teaching should enable children to...

talk about somewhere that is special to themselves, saying why

Please note that this unit of work is detailed in order to provide examples of a wide range of teaching and learning opportunities for children in schools. It is not expected that school planning will be as detailed as this; the key is to follow the planning process above to achieve the learning outcomes in the syllabus.

Teaching and Learning

Pupil outcomes:

Teachers can select from the following and adapt as appropriate, making sure that the learning outcomes are met and that children’s learning needs are addressed. This material need not be taught as a whole unit but can be linked to work in other subject areas. Our special places If I could go anywhere... Start off a circle time that lets children express where they would love to go, and say why. Teachers or TAs might share a special place they have been to. Encourage a varied set of aspirations. Children listen to and report back to class on their partner‟s special place. Ask children to think about the places in school they like best. Where is a good place in our school to be happy? To be sad? To be friendly? To be thoughtful? To be calm? If the children can agree on these places, then go and do something friendly in the friendliest place, something happy in the happiest place, something thoughtful in the thoughtful place, something calm in the clam place. Photograph some special places in and around school (Older children could do this, and bring their ideas to the 4-5 year olds). Create a PowerPoint and annotate with speech bubbles for children to say: Why are these places special? Are the all special to everyone, or just to some people? This can be a class or group activity. Incorporate photographs taken outside of school / at home into the PowerPoint. Use the 5 senses to describe special place –what could you hear/ touch/ smell/ taste/ see there? Children ask other members of the school community about

Can children...?

Wiltshire Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2011 – Appendix F

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PSED 4 Respond to significant experiences, showing a range of feelings when appropriate. CLL 7 Use language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences. K&U Find out about their environment and talk about those features they like and dislike L1 I can talk about my own special place and say how it makes me feel

Notes

Schools may like to consider creating a spiritual garden in their schools. See Shahne Vickery‟s book, Creating a multi-sensory spiritual garden in your school, published by Jumping Fish, available from http://gloucester.anglican.org/ resources/jfish/

APPENDIX R their special places. Key question: Learning outcomes Teaching should enable children to...

be aware that some religious people have special places which have special meaning to them get to know and use appropriate words to talk about their thoughts and feelings when visiting a church

What makes a place special? Teaching and Learning

Pupil outcomes:

Teachers can select from the following and adapt as appropriate, making sure that the learning outcomes are met and that children’s learning needs are addressed. This material need not be taught as a whole unit but can be linked to work in other subject areas.

Can children...?

Special religious places: Christianity Use a resource such as Say Hello To... Mary (RE Today, an electronic book) or share a book such as My Christian Faith Evans Books. Talk about the Church as a sacred place for Christians. Listen to some well known hymns or songs that may be sung in a Church. Listen carefully to hear the words, instruments (e.g. the organ - most churches will have one). Ask how the music makes us feel? Is it joyful? Peaceful? Is it about praising and thanking? What music makes the children feel excited, or calm?

CLL 4 Listen with enjoyment and respond to stories, songs and other music, rhymes and poems and make up their own stories, songs, rhymes and poems.

Link up with an older class who have already visited the Church. In the playground, the older children make a „chalk church‟ outline, a great big cross, and they mark the doors and some special features. Two of the older children walk round the „chalk church‟ with two of the FS children ones, telling them what they saw and showing their photos. They tell the 4 year olds what they learned.

PSED 6 Have a developing respect for their own cultures and beliefs and those of other people (through exploring a Christian place of worship).

Questions to discuss after this activity   

who goes to church and why? why is a church sometimes built in a cross shape? What happens at church? when you go to visit a church, what will you ask?

Wiltshire Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2011 – Appendix F

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PSED 13 Understand that people have different needs, views, cultures and

Notes

This unit develops a wide range of children‟s skills including: Language and literacy – new vocabulary, developing communication: speaking and listening skills. Working with others Thinking skills

APPENDIX R Visit a Church. Organise a visit to the local church. When you get there, do some activities – sketch some flowers and some other beautiful things you see there, listen to a story, act out a story. Make up questions, and find some answers. Talk about the feelings of the place – calm or exciting? Happy not sad? Thoughtful? L1 Friendly? Look at the outside of the Church: has it a steeple? A bell tower? When might you use the bells? Go inside; focus on the aisle, pews or chairs, symbols of the cross, water in the font. Discuss the symbolism of the candles („Jesus is the light of the world‟ – what do Christians mean by that?) and the altar as a revered area within the church, a „special place in a special place‟. Many statues, wall hangings, wooden carvings, stained glass depicting scenes from the Bible or a Saint. Explain why Christians may like to see these things. Is the Church light or dark inside? One way of preparing for a visit might be to include a list of key words in a word bank to discuss before the visit, matching the words with photos from the church, and then matching them with the real object in the church. One school says: “We often invite our vicar to be part of this special first visit to church – they can also show hidden or exciting parts of the church (ie the tower steps! Etc), that could help a non-specialist feel more comfortable. This also helps with community cohesion!”

Wiltshire Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2011 – Appendix F

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beliefs which need to be treated with respect (through exploring a Christian place of worship).

I can talk about what I find interesting or puzzling about a church I can say the names of different parts of the church. I can recognise and name some symbols in a church, such as a cross

APPENDIX R

Key question: What makes a place special? Learning outcomes Teaching should enable children to...

be aware that some religious people have special places which have special meaning for them

Teaching and Learning

Pupil outcomes:

Teachers can select from the following and adapt as appropriate, making sure that the learning outcomes are met and that children’s learning needs are addressed. This material need not be taught as a whole unit but can be linked to work in other subject areas.

Can children...?

Look at a Hindu home shrine Tell the group that they are going to learn about a special place in a Hindu home. Show a photograph of a Hindu shrine then pass around the circle the objects that will form the shrine display. Explain that a shrine is a special place where Hindus pray and feel close to God. The shrine in the picture is in a Hindu family‟s home. Ask the visitor (or use a persona doll) to answer people‟s questions and put their own, for example, „Why do you think Geeta likes having a candle in the shrine?‟ Play some Asian music. Let each person come forward to place an artefact on the shrine display and to have a close look at it.

CLL 4 Listen with enjoyment and respond to stories, songs and other music, rhymes and poems and make up their own stories, songs, rhymes and poems.

Note: Teachers will need to be prepared to correct children‟s misconceptions at this point, as they arise. A lot of little children believe people with a darker skin colour must be from eg the Muslim faith or from India! Showing images of people of a range of different skin colours to portray different faiths is helpful. As always, we must remember as teachers to use the words „SOME Hindus have a shrine,‟ and mention that there are Hindus all over the world and that they often practise their faith Wiltshire Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2011 – Appendix F

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PSED 6 Have a developing respect for their own cultures and beliefs and those of other people (through exploring a Hindu shrine). PSED 13 Understand that people have different needs, views, cultures and beliefs which need to be treated with respect (through exploring a Hindu shrine). L1 I can talk about what I find interesting or puzzling about a Hindu shrine I can recognise and name some symbols and objects in

Notes

Persona dolls are good if you cannot get a visitor to come to the classroom. Persona dolls are available from Articles of Faith Useful books to support the use of Persona dolls in the classroom are Persona Dolls in RE Jumping fish publications The little book of persona dolls Marilyn Bowles

APPENDIX R a Hindu shrine, such as an arti lamp

in different ways.

Key question: What makes a place special? Learning outcomes Teaching should enable children to...

talk about somewhere that is special to themselves, saying why

Teaching and Learning Teachers can select from the following and adapt as appropriate, making sure that the learning outcomes are met and that children’s learning needs are addressed. This material need not be taught as a whole unit but can be linked to work in other subject areas. Special places in stories: what do we like? Read a story with the class that is about a special place. A good example is The Big, Big Sea by Martin Waddell, illustrated by Jenny Eachus. It is a lovely story of mother and daughter on the beach. This story is about how the beach is a special place for the girl in the book. The occasion, her mum‟s company and the magical view are what makes it special. Ask children if they know other stories about special places, and if they like them. Talk about our own special places again, and ask children what makes the places they love most special. Alternatives to this book include: Enchantment in the Garden by Shirley Hughes (Red Fox, 1996). Another alternative would be to show children a clip from a movie where a special place can be seen and explored: for example, the bedroom in Toy Story.

Wiltshire Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2011 – Appendix F

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Levelled pupil outcomes: so that children can say “I can...” to one or more of the statements below.

Notes

PSED 4 Respond to significant experiences, showing a range of feelings when appropriate.

The Big Big Sea is read on BBC Learning Zone Class Clips library, clip number 1082.

CLL 7 Use language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences. L1 I can talk about different special places and say how they make people feel, and how they make me feel

APPENDIX R

Key question: What makes a place special? Learning outcomes Teaching should enable children to...

talk about somewhere that is special to themselves saying why

Teaching and Learning Teachers can select from the following and adapt as appropriate, making sure that the learning outcomes are met and that children’s learning needs are addressed. This material need not be taught as a whole unit but can be linked to work in other subject areas. Making our own special places Say to the group, „Let‟s make some special places in the classroom. How shall we make them?‟ Listen to all the ideas, and list them. You might feed in suggestions: special places made in teams, like dens or little houses. What are they for? Places to look at special things, to meet people, to share, to be friendly, to be calm. Give each group of 3-6 children some sheets or curtain materials, and clothes pegs. They can create a den, a shelter or a little house in a part of the classroom. They can think up and play out some special activities or things to look at. It is often good to talk about this one day, and do it the next morning – so that children can bring some things from home. Encourage children to enjoy playing in the space they have made special, and visit each other‟s special places. Ask children: is your special place like the church at all? Can you think of any ways it is similar? Compare with special places outside, linking with the wonder of creation or nature. Spiritual gardens can be wonderful for this.

Wiltshire Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2011 – Appendix F

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Levelled pupil outcomes:

Notes

so that children can say “I can...” to one or more of the statements below.

. PSED 13 Understand that people have different needs, views, cultures and beliefs which need to be treated with respect. CLL 7 Use language to imagine and recreate roles and experiences.

L1 I can create with others and learn from what we create. I can talk about what made our place special

There are always safety issues about this kind of team play: good teaching will be alert to these, and plan to avoid them. Play matters: it is easy to think we have no time for this kind of activity, but learning is deepened and made personal through play for 4-5 year olds.

APPENDIX R

Key question: What makes a place special? Learning outcomes Teaching should enable children to...

get to know and use appropriate words to talk about their thoughts and feelings when learning about special places

Teaching and Learning Teachers can select from the following and adapt as appropriate, making sure that the learning outcomes are met and that children’ learning needs are addressed. This material need not be taught as a whole unit but can be linked to work in other subject areas.

Making pictures Give children time to enjoy some drawing and picture making. They might choose between drawing three pictures in a 3-piece frame – one of the church or Hindu shrine, one of their own special place and one of a school special place, or making one larger art work that shows several things about their own special place. Give them some good quality materials to work with – perhaps they can incorporate a photo from the visit or virtual tour. When these pieces of work are finished, use circle time to share and review them. Spend some class time talking about the unit: remind the children of the stilling story, the church visit, the den-making play time, the story The Big, Big Sea by Martin Waddell and other things you did. Questions of wonder: Ask these questions giving pauses and time for answers to develop. Receive all the answers with thanks, but no comment. What makes a place special? Where is your special place? What do you like to do there? How do you feel? What do Christians like to do in their special place, the church? How might they feel? Does everyone have the same special place? Why is a religious building a special place for some people? Are some places special because of what happens there? Are some places special to lots of people? Do you think our local church (or the virtual visit church we saw) is a

Wiltshire Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2011 – Appendix F

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Levelled pupil outcomes:

Notes

so that children can say “I can...” to one or more of the statements below. CLL Use talk to organise, sequence and clarify thinking, ideas, feelings and events.

This unit has many more links with the ELG areas, especially K&U of the world and creative development. SEAL programmes connect to the work as well.

L1 I can make pictures to show what I have learned about special places I can talk thoughtfully about what makes a place special

APPENDIX R special place? Why / why not?

Resources Websites The National Association of Teachers of RE (NATRE) hosts a web gallery of children‟s art work. Here children can look at works of art by other children, including images associated with festivals: www.natre.org.uk/spiritedarts Animated World Faiths, Programme1, Life of Christ: www.channel4.com/programmes/stop-look-listen-animated-bible-stories RE:Quest is a very useful site for learning about Christianity: www.request.org.uk The Dottie and Buzz website contains a video clip on Baptism: www.dottieandbuzz.co.uk/prog3/index.html CLEO has a collection of excellent video resources for RE in all key stages: www.cleo.net.uk The Welsh Virtual Teacher Centre contains some good materials for this age group: www.ngfl-cymru.org.uk Educhurch has virtual tours for Christianity, Judaism and Islam: www.educhurch.co.uk REonline is a good gateway site: www.reonline.org.uk Rejesus provides a good range of images of Jesus and interesting points of view: http://rejesus.co.uk The National Society supports RE with some books and a website on „Encountering Christianity‟: www.encounterchristianity.co.uk The BBC‟s Learning Zone Broadband Clips Library provides short clips on a wide variety of RE topics in 6 religions: www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips Books Special Places, Worship (Developing Primary RE), ed. Joyce Mackley, RE Today, ISBN 978-1-904024-19-4, http://shop.retoday.org.uk Places of Worship photo packs are available from Folens: www.folens,com Artefacts Articles of Faith: www.articlesoffaith.co.uk Religion in Evidence: www.tts-group.co.uk Local Christian bookshops Video, CD/DVD and Audio Places for Worship, a DVD plus pack for 5 – 7s from the BBC, includes places of worship in Christianity, Judaism and Islam: www.bbcactive.com/schoolshop Say Hello To... is a set of 6 electronic books and accompanying resources. „Mary‟s Story‟ is the relevant one in this unit. RE Today, ISBN 978-1-90402481-1, http://shop.retoday.org.uk

Wiltshire Agreed Syllabus for Religious Education 2011 – Appendix F

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What Makes a Place Special

APPENDIX R Exemplar Unit of Work: Foundation Stage - What makes a place special? This unit of work contributes towards the principal aim of RE in Wilt...

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