middlesbrough council council 13 july 2016 strategic plan 2016-2020

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MIDDLESBROUGH COUNCIL COUNCIL 13 JULY 2016 STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2020 CHIEF EXECUTIVE PURPOSE OF THE REPORT 1. This report: 



updates the Council’s Strategic Plan to 2019/20, incorporating a Medium-Term Financial Plan and Investment Strategy for the same period, and positioning this consolidated document as the Council’s four-year ‘Efficiency Plan’, required by the Government to access a four-year funding settlement; and outlines activity to identify further transformation opportunities for the 2018-20 period, which will be presented to Council in November 2016 in the draft first refresh of the 2016-20 Strategic Plan.

2. The report seeks approval of the draft Strategic Plan for 2016-20, and agreement that the document be submitted to the Department of Local Communities to enable the Council to secure a four-year funding settlement. BACKGROUND 3. The Strategic Plan is the Council’s overarching business plan, outlining its contribution to the Mayor’s Vision for Middlesbrough and providing a broad overview of high-level improvement activity in the medium term, within the financial parameters outlined in its Medium-Term Financial Plan. 4. The Strategic Plan is central to the Council’s corporate governance framework and is updated annually. It is also the basis of the Council’s performance management framework, with progress against the plan reviewed on a quarterly basis via Balanced Scorecards. 5. In November 2015, Council approved the Strategic Plan for 2015-18, incorporating a Medium-Term Financial Plan for the same period. In March 2016, Council agreed the budget for 2016/17, and indicative three-year budget allocations for each Outcome Area to 2018/19. This report:  

updates the Medium Term Financial Plan to 2019/20, responding to the offer of a four-year funding settlement made by the Government; updates the Strategic Plan for the 2016-20 period, incorporating an Investment Strategy for the same period, and positioning this consolidated document as the 1



Council’s four-year ‘Efficiency Plan’, as required by the Government to access the four-year settlement; and outlines activity to identify further transformation opportunities for the 2018-20 period, which will be presented to Council in November 2016 in the draft first refresh of the Strategic Plan.

Medium-Term Financial Plan to 2020 6. The 2016/17 Local Government Finance Settlement, confirmed in February 2016, sets out the grant income local authorities will receive from the Government up to and including the financial year 2019/20, and for the first time offers authorities a four-year funding settlement, provided efficiencies to be achieved across this period are clear. 7. From the start of the current period of public sector austerity in 2010, the Council has argued strongly that multi-year settlements are essential to allow proper financial planning and a structured, transformational, approach to balancing its budget in the medium term. As such the Council intends to take up this offer and submit its 2016-20 Strategic Plan to the Department of Communities and Local Government as its fouryear ‘Efficiency Plan’, required by the Government to access this funding settlement. 8. Taking advantage of the four-year planning horizon, the Council has been able to completely refresh its Medium Term Financial Plan to:   

utilise accumulated balances to smooth out the savings required year-on-year, and to pump prime transformational activity; address the savings requirement for 2018-20 through transformational efficiency initiatives managed through Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme; and focus investment on growing the town’s economic base to improve local prosperity and secure a robust and independent income stream to fund the Council’s services.

9. The refreshed Medium Term Financial Plan identifies a net savings requirement of £9.2m for the period 2017/18 to 2019/20 over and above those already approved by Council for this period, as set out below:

Spending pressures Government funding reductions Local funding increases Planned savings Budget gap Net savings requirement Use of reserves In-year budget position

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

Total £ms

9.6 6.8 -3.7 -11.5 1.2 0.0 -1.2 0.0

8.1 1.8 -3.3 -1.2 5.4 -4.6 -0.8 0.0

12.7 2.0 -3.4 -0.5 10.8 -4.6 -6.2 0.0

30.4 10.6 -10.4 -13.2 17.4 -9.2

10. A four-year financial settlement presents the Council with an opportunity to plan over a longer period to meet this savings requirement. While the Council will be a smaller organisation by 2020 than it is currently, a Strategic Plan focused on investment and efficiency, and creating growth in Council Tax, Business Rates and income from commercial activity, aims to minimise service-level and job reductions over this period.

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11. The following assumptions have been applied in refreshing the Council’s Medium-Term Financial Plan. Government funding reductions 12. Government funding has been assumed to fall during the period to 2020: Funding Stream Revenue Support Grant Business Rates Top Up New Homes Bonus Housing Benefit Admin Grant Education Support Grant Public Health Grant Improved Better Care Fund Total:

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

21.05 22.24 2.780 0.796 0.776 17.230 0.749

16.53 22.90 2.897 0.646 0.550 16.461 3.854

11.96 23.63 3.139 0.496 0.336 15.731 6.561

65.621

63.838

61.853

Local funding increases 13. Local funding has been assumed to increase during the same period: Funding Stream Council Tax Core Council Tax: Adult Social Care Precept Local Share of Business Rates Total:

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

46.727 1.804 21.607 70.138

48.407 2.760 22.257 73.424

50.074 3.752 22.983 76.809

14. It has been assumed that the Council will increase Council Tax by 2% per annum and also apply the 2% Adult Social Care Precept (as introduced by Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne in the November 2015 Spending Review) in every year of the period to meet anticipated demand for social care. These assumptions are in line with the Government’s own assumptions within the Local Government Finance Settlement. Pay awards and inflation 15. A 1% annual pay award has been assumed. 16. Contractual inflation at a total cost of £5.1 million has been assumed in the period. No provision has been made for inflation for supplies and services, and it is expected any inflationary pressures in this area will be met from efficiency savings. 17. Income from fees and charges has been assumed to increase on average by 1%. This excludes car parking and statutory charges.

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Living Wage 18. In line with the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough, the Council is committed to ensuring that its lowest paid employees benefit from being paid the Living Wage Foundation hourly rate and a total of £3.0m has been provided over the period to fund this commitment. Living Wage Foundation provision Additional in-year Cumulative

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

0.300 0.300

1.100 1.400

1.600 3.000

19. In addition, increases in the rebranded minimum wage (the National Living Wage), will impact upon organisations – principally care providers – who are contracted to carry out functions on behalf of the Council. A further £3.0m has been allocated over the period to cover the increases in costs expected as a result of these pressures. National Living Wage (minimum wage) provision Additional in-year Cumulative

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

1.000 1.000

1.000 2.000

1.000 3.000

Demand pressures 20. The following assumptions have been made in relation to demand-led pressure within Safeguarding and Children’s Care and within Social Care. Safeguarding and Children’s Care – Net pressures Additional in-year Cumulative Social Care – Net pressures Additional in-year Cumulative

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

1.500 1.500

1.500 3.000

1.500 4.500

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

0.241 0.241

0.319 0.560

0.319 0.879

Investment Strategy 21. Over the period of the Strategic Plan the Council intends to invest £64.9m of its own resources in building the town’s economic base, driving financial self-sufficiency and transforming how the Council delivers its services. 22. This will be made up of £11.5m of identified revenue resources and £53.4m of Capital Investment. This will involve additional borrowing, which will have the following impact:

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Revenue cost of investment Additional in-year Cumulative

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

0.300 0.300

0.000 0.300

0.300 0.600

23. It is estimated that the Investment Strategy will generate £0.9m per annum in income for the Council by 2019/20 from increased Council Tax and Business rates, with this expected to grow significantly in the years beyond 2020. 24. The Investment Strategy is appended to the Strategic Plan and will replace the Council’s current Capital Programme, subject to approval by Council. Other changes 25. A provision of £0.397m has been made for the impact of the Apprentice Levy which comes into force on 1 April 2017. Use of Reserves and Balances 26. Over the period to 2020, the Council plans to utilise £8.2m of its general balances in order to smooth the budget savings requirement. This will allow time to plan future savings effectively to ensure that there is the minimum possible impact on residents and service users. 27. Over the Medium-Term Financial Plan period, the Council intends to use £7.4m from its Change Fund in order to support transformational activity to deliver its Strategic Plan. 28. The Council also plans to use £10.5m of revenue balances, including £3.5m identified in the 2015/16 Outturn report, as part of its Investment Strategy. 29. The planned use of balances will reduce the Council’s General Fund balance to £4.5m by the end of the 2019/20 financial year, in line with the Council’s recommended General Fund level of £4.0-£4.5m. In addition, a review of earmarked reserves will significantly reduce the level of these balances held by the Council in the light of the reduced risk assessment allowed by a four-year funding settlement. Contingency 30. Following an assessment of the level of uncertainty within the Medium-Term Financial Plan, particularly in the areas of demand forecasting and the likely level of Business Rate appeals, an overall contingency of £1.2m per annum has been provided, replacing the discrete contingencies previously provided to Outcome Areas. 2015/16 Outturn 31. The 2015/16 Outturn reported budget savings in some Outcome Areas. These savings have been analysed and the recurring element reflected in the £13.2m of budget savings planned for future years. £3.5m identified in the 2015/16 Outturn report will be utilised to part fund the Investment Strategy to 2020.

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Strategic Plan to 2020 32. In November 2015, Council approved the Strategic Plan for 2015-18, incorporating a Medium-Term Financial Plan for the same period. 33. It is the Council’s policy to refresh this document on an annual basis. However, in line with the Government’s offer of a four-year funding settlement, the Council has now revised its Strategic Plan to cover the same period in order for it to meet the criteria for a four-year funding settlement. The draft 2016-20 Strategic Plan is set out at Appendix 1 for approval. 34. The 2016-20 Strategic Plan:   

sets out how the Council will contribute to the Mayor’s Vision for Middlesbrough in 2025 – Fairer, Safer, Stronger, endorsed by Council on 11 May 2016; summarises the Council’s performance in 2015/16 and its overarching performance objectives to 2020, including its transformational priorities; and incorporates an Investment Strategy to 2020 that will grow the town’s economic base and the Council’s income streams and provide for significant investment in transformational efficiency within the organisation.

35. In updating the Strategic Plan, the opportunity to significantly streamline the document has been taken, reflecting its strategic purpose. Outcome Delivery Plans will continue to be utilised as business plans for Outcome and Service Areas, but going forward an executive summary of these documents only will be provided within the Strategic Plan. The Plan and its supporting Outcome Delivery Plans reflect changes to the Council’s structure set out in the recent senior management review. Delivery of the Strategic Plan 36. Since 2013, the Council has developed and implemented a Change Programme to meet the unprecedented savings challenges it faces in the medium-term, while at the same time maximising the Council’s contribution to strategic objectives for Middlesbrough. 37. The Change Programme has been very effective in delivering efficiencies and transformational change within the Council, delivering £52.5m savings to date and driving service modernisation and new management practices, in line with the Council’s new operating model. 38. Nevertheless, there remains more to do to fully embed the Council’s operating model, and the Council will continue to transform in order to maximise opportunities presented by the Tees Valley Combined Authority and associated partnership arrangements. 39. Opportunities for further transformational efficiencies in the period to 2020 are considered to lie within the following broad thematic areas, reflecting the Strategic Plan’s focus on investment, growth and efficiency:    

Growing Our Economic Base; Partnership and Integration; Online and Self-Serve; Value for Money; and 6



Return on Investment.

40. While the Council already has plans in place in relation to the above, a further, intensive period of analysis will be undertaken during summer 2016 with the aim of identifying potential further efficiencies within these thematic areas for the 2018-20 period. The output from this process will be presented to Council in November 2016 in the draft first annual refresh of the 2016-20 Strategic Plan. Consultation 41. Consultation with partners and local communities on how all stakeholders can best work together to deliver the Mayor’s Vision has recently concluded. The output from this process will inform the Strategic Plan as it develops. Executive and Assistant Directors will continue to engage with Overview and Scrutiny Board and Scrutiny Panels to test proposals for change in their respective Outcome Areas and seek feedback. Any material changes to service provision will continue to be the subject of user and stakeholder consultation, as appropriate. PROPOSALS 42. It is proposed that the Medium-Term Financial Plan position for the period to 2019/20 is noted. 43. It is proposed that the 2016-20 Strategic Plan is approved, as the means of meeting with savings targets identified within the Medium-Term Financial Plan. Approval of the plan will ensure that the Council’s overarching business plan remains fit for purpose, enable the effective delivery of strategic priorities, and to communicate the Council’s improvement agenda to all stakeholders. The draft first refresh of the Strategic Plan will be presented to Council in November 2016, outlining further transformation opportunities. 44. It is proposed that the Investment Strategy, focused on transformation, growth and efficiency and appended to the 2016-20 Strategic Plan, is approved and henceforth replaces the Council’s existing capital programme. 45. It is proposed that the 2016-20 Strategic Plan is submitted to the Department of Communities and Local Government as the Council’s four-year ‘Efficiency Plan’, to enable the Council to secure the four-year funding settlement offered to local authorities in the 2016/17 Local Government Finance Settlement. Reasons 46. To enable the Council to take a systematic, coherent and controlled approach to addressing ongoing financial challenges over the medium-term, while maximising its contribution to the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough. Options and Risks 47. The Council has no option but to address its savings challenges. The 2016-20 Strategic Plan provides the means to achieve this in a proactive and systematic manner over a four-year period, while continuing to reshape the Council to lead the delivery of the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough. 7

48. The approach outlined requires the planned and prudent used of reserves and balances over the period to 2020. Failure to utilise these reserves would jeopardise the deliverability of transformational savings. 49. The 2016-20 Strategic Plan incorporates the Council’s Strategic Risk Register. Given the current pace of change within the public sector, new risks and issues will inevitably arise during the period to 2020. 50. The current major challenges for local authorities lie around managing the impact of the following legislation which is either in the process of being implemented, or form part of the recent Queen’s Speech for this session of Parliament: 

   

continued implementation of the Care Act 2014 and the ongoing integration of health and social care within the context of and parameters of the NHS Five Year Forward View process, together with reductions in local authority funding for Public Health; working with partners to successfully implement the Tees Valley Combined Authority, which became operational on 1 April 2016, and exploit opportunities arising from the associated Devolution Deal; ongoing implementation of welfare and social housing reforms and their combined impact on local residents and communities; education reform to date and further reform and changes to funding formula contained in the Education Bill and SEND reforms; and the Local Growth and Jobs Bill, including proposals for local authority retention of Business Rates, post-2020.

51. Most significantly, on 23 June 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union, and at present it appears highly likely that Brexit will be implemented. The Treasury and the Bank of England have both highlighted the risks to the UK economy of leaving the European Union, including a potential further wave of public sector austerity and negative impact on confidence and investment in the UK economy. In recent days, the Chancellor of the Exchequer has withdrawn his commitment to achieving a budget surplus by 2020. Clearly, there are potentially significant implications for the Council from Brexit, but at this stage it is not possible to quantify these in any meaningful way. The Council will review this and other risks (and opportunities) on a quarterly basis, and take mitigating actions as appropriate. Actual and potential impacts will be reported in future iterations of the Strategic Plan. Equality Impact Assessment 52. In line with statutory requirements, the 2016-20 Strategic Plan has been subject to a Level 1 (screening) Impact Assessment, which is at Appendix 2 of this report. 53. No negative differential impact on diverse groups and communities is anticipated from the direction of travel set by the Strategic Plan. Proposed changes for the current year formed part of the 2016/17 Budget, approved by Council on 2 March 2016, and were either impact-assessed as part of that process, or will be assessed in-year where appropriate. The same approach will be adopted throughout the 2016-20 planning period.

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FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS 54. Planned activity for 2016/17 formed part of the Council’s Budget, approved by Council on 2 March 2016. The 2016-20 Strategic Plan will be refreshed on an annual basis and future financial implications will be set out clearly within associated reports to Executive and Full Council. 55. It is anticipated that the approach set out in this report will enable the Council to present the 2016-20 Strategic Plan to the Department of Communities and Local Government as the Council’s Four-Year Efficiency Plan and thereby access a four-year funding settlement for the first time. 56. The use of reserves and balances over the period 2016-20 will take the Council’s General Fund balance down to the recommended level of £4.0-4.5m and reduce the level of earmarked reserves in a sustainable manner. RECOMMENDATIONS It is recommended that Council:  

 

Notes the Medium-Term Financial Plan position for the period to 2019/20. Approves the 2016-20 Strategic Plan as the means of meeting with savings targets identified within the Medium-Term Financial Plan, and agrees that this be submitted to the Department of Local Communities to enable the Council to secure a four-year funding settlement, as offered to local authorities in the 2016/17 Local Government Finance Settlement. Approves the Investment Strategy to 2020, focused on transformation, growth and efficiency and appended to the 2016-20 Strategic Plan, to replace the Council’s existing capital programme. Notes the further activity to be undertaken to identify further transformation opportunities for 2018-20, which will be presented to Council in November 2016 in the first draft refresh of the 2016-20 Strategic Plan.

BACKGROUND PAPERS Executive Report | 23 April 2013 | Change Programme and Senior Management Arrangements Executive Report | 16 July 2013 | Progressing the Change Programme Executive Report | 18 March 2014 | Change Programme 2014-2017 Council Report | 14 May 2014 | Change Programme 2014-17 Council Report | 4 March 2015 | Revenue Budget, Council Tax and Prudential Indicators 2015/16 Executive Report | 14 July 2015 | Strategic Plan 2015-2018 Council Report | 25 November 2015 | Strategic Plan 2015-18 Council Report | 2 March 2016 | Revenue Budget, Council Tax and Prudential Indicators 2016/17 Executive Report | 27 June 2016 | Strategic Plan 2016-20

CONTACT Paul Stephens, Head of Performance and Partnerships [email protected] | 01642 729223

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Appendix 1: Strategic Plan 2016-2020 Purpose of the Strategic Plan 1. The Strategic Plan is the Council’s overarching business plan, outlining its contribution to the Mayor’s 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough and providing a broad overview of highlevel improvement activity in the medium term to 2020, within the financial parameters outlined in its Medium-Term Financial Plan. 2. The Strategic Plan is central to the Council’s corporate governance framework and is updated annually. The ‘line of sight’ from the 2025 Vision through the Council’s service planning is illustrated below.

3. The Strategic Plan is also the basis of the Council’s performance management framework, with progress against the plan reviewed on a quarterly basis via Balanced Scorecards, reported to Overview and Scrutiny Board and Executive. Supporting the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough 4. The 2025 Vision – Fairer, Safer, Stronger, sets out the Elected Mayor’s for Middlesbrough over the next decade: A Fairer Middlesbrough

A Safer Middlesbrough

A Stronger Middlesbrough



Fairness and reduced inequalities in income and health.





Strengthening and diversifying our local economy.



Fair access to secure, well-paid jobs and meaningful training.



Strengthening our city through bold and innovative regeneration.



Strengthening our cultural sector.



Strengthening our transport links.





Fair access to high-quality homes. 

Safer communities – further reducing crime and anti-social behaviour. Safer, independent lives – ensuring our children and vulnerable adults are protected. Safer environment – ensuring our town is cleaner and more resilient to a changing climate.

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5. The Council has identified eight key outcomes that together represent its contribution to the achievement of the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough. Within the Council’s senior management structure, eight strategic managers take individual responsibility for these individual outcomes, and collective responsibility for all eight outcomes, as set out below.

6. This outcome-based structure allows the Council to fully focus its efforts on supporting the delivery of the Mayor’s Vision, and is a key element of the Council’s new operating model. The Council’s operating model has changed in recent years from that of being a default provider of services to that of a default commissioner of outcomes, so ensuring Best Value, while maintaining its overarching responsibility for ensuring the social, economic and environmental wellbeing of the town. The Council’s operating model is illustrated in the diagram below.

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7. The Council operates a culture where there is strong political leadership and accountability; local needs are identified and effectively and efficiently met; collaboration, joint-working and income opportunities are maximised; and appropriate service delivery models are employed. 8. Services and functions identified by the Council as necessary to support the achievement of its targeted outcomes will be provided by those organisations that offer best value (in terms of benefits, cost and the balance of risk). A key element of this model is to work more cooperatively with local people and voluntary and community groups, developing their capacity and enabling them to co-design and deliver local services, manage local assets and so improve local outcomes over the long term. 9. The embedding of the operating model to enable the achievement of key performance and savings targets has been a key focus of the Council’s Change Programme since its inception. Partnership working 10. Increasingly the Council is working in partnership, and developing integrated services with, organisations from all sectors in support of the Mayor’s Vision for Middlesbrough in 2025. 11. The Tees Valley has a distinct and unique economy and the success of its partnership working through Tees Valley Unlimited (TVU) has meant that the five local authorities – Darlington, Hartlepool, Middlesbrough, Redcar & Cleveland and Stockton-On-Tees – have agreed proposals to form a Combined Authority, which became operational on 1 April 2016. 12. The Combined Authority will be able to make decisions on strategic transport and infrastructure, employment and skills, economic development, business investment and low carbon at a Tees Valley level, with the local authorities and private sector being represented in the decision-making process. The Combined Authority has now put in place its cornerstone document, the Strategic Economic Plan. 13. In October 2015, a devolution deal was signed with central government which is worth £450m over 30 years, equivalent to an additional £15million per year, and provides for the transfer of significant powers for employment and skills, transport, planning and investment from central government to the Tees Valley. A new investment fund will be created to deliver a programme of investment in the region over the 30-year period, which will include a devolved and consolidated transport budget. The deal also includes a comprehensive review and redesign of the education, skills and employment support system. 14. The Tees Valley will introduce a directly elected city region Mayor who will work alongside the leaders of the five local authorities to provide leadership and be directly accountable to the electorate. The Tees Valley Leaders and Mayor have committed in principle to the deal, and it has now gained formal consent from each council. The target date for having an elected Mayor is May 2017. 15. In December 2015, the NHS shared planning guidance for 2016-21 outlined a new approach to help ensure that health and care services are built around the needs of 12

local populations. Under this guidance, every health and care system in England will produce a multi-year Sustainability and Transformation Plan (STP), showing how local services will evolve and become sustainable over the next five years – ultimately delivering the Five Year Forward View vision of better health, better patient care and improved NHS efficiency. 16. Middlesbrough sits within the Durham, Darlington, Tees, Hambleton, Richmondshire and Whitby ‘footprint’ area. The health and care organisations within these geographic footprints are working together to develop STPs which will help drive genuine and sustainable transformation in patient experience and health outcomes of the longerterm. STPs will be submitted in June, with a view to implementation starting in Autumn 2016, and provide the context for the development of more localised developments in health and social care, including the requirement for Integrated Care Organisations to be developed by 2020. 17. The Council will continue to work with the Police and Crime Commissioner for Cleveland, Cleveland Police and other blue light services to keep local communities safe and further reduce crime and anti-social behaviour in Middlesbrough. Joint working with Cleveland Police in particular will be progressed, in line with the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough. 18. The Council will continue to develop its joint working with Teesside University, a key partner in Middlesbrough’s economic and cultural development. Development of the cultural sector with partners will be a specific priority for the Council over the next four years, again in line with the 2025 Vision. 19. While much current partnership working is at Tees or South Tees level, the successful delivery of the Strategic Plan will also require a robust local voluntary and community sector within Middlesbrough, and engaged and supported local communities. The Council will continue to work with VCS in Middlesbrough to co-produce outcomes and build on existing community assets. 20. The Council has with its partners undertaken a significant amount of work in the last year to review and improve local partnership arrangements to ensure that they dovetail with developments in wider geographic areas, while still delivering for Middlesbrough. The Health and Wellbeing Board, Community Safety Partnership, Middlesbrough Achievement Partnership and Children and Young People’s Delivery Partnership have all been refreshed and will be kept under regular review in line with the developments outlined above. A Middlesbrough 2025 Vision Board will be put in place during 2016/17 to oversee local partnership working. The Council’s performance in 2015/16 21. The Council continued to demonstrate a high level of performance overall in the last year. 95.3% of the £14.1m of revenue savings identified in the 2015/16 budget were delivered in-year, and the Council underspent its revenue budget overall, generating a saving of £0.5m (0.4% of the budget). The Council has now saved £38.5m (27% of the baseline budget) since the inception of its Change Programme in 2013/14. 22. Sickness absence of staff improved to 8.46 days from 9.41 days per FTE in 2014/15, though remained short of the 2015 local government average of 7.9 days and the challenging corporate target of 7.5 days. An employee satisfaction survey was 13

undertaken in the year, with every Outcome Area scoring higher than the 70% target for job satisfaction. Human Resources will work in partnership with the Improving Public Health Outcome Area to address issues from the survey and further improve employee satisfaction in 2016/17. 23. Staff and service productivity was high, with 85% of the Council’s key customer and business performance targets achieved in 2015/16. Highlights and issues were as follows: Highlights 







 





730 new homes were delivered in the year, with 327 at Council Tax Band D or over, against targets of 410 and 130 respectively, reflecting the Council’s ambition to grow the local economic base and create a greater balance in the local housing market. The town centre Holiday Inn Express hotel – part-funded by a loan from the Council – opened in summer 2015 and has been so successful that an extension was confirmed in-year. The successful pedestrianisation of Southfield Road was completed, contributing to the ongoing transformation of Teesside University campus. The Council continued to support the development of independent retail in the town, particularly in Baker and Bedford Streets, with the former receiving national recognition. Manufacturing was also supported, with TWI (total cost £7.9m) completed in-year. The Council continued to develop and improve its Early Help offer in-year, with 66 Troubled Families assisted to achieve sustained and positive outcomes against a target of 30, and 149 Children in Need referrals resulting in Common Assessment Framework step-downs, against a target of 80. Following a peer review of undertaken by the Local Government Association in September 2015, the Council’s Early Help services have an increasing impact in the coming four years. Headline achievement at the Early Years Foundation Stage, and rates of progression between Key Stages 1 and 2 for reading, writing and maths all exceeded target. Pupils attending a school rated ‘Good’ or better by Ofsted increased to 84% from 80% in 2014/15. 16-18 years olds not in education, employment or training (NEET) stood at 6.9% at year-end, against a target of 8.7%. First Time Entrants to the Youth Justice System reduced still further to 424 per 100,000 population, less than 50% of the target for the year, and down by over 20% from 2014/15. The 2015/16 Better Care Fund Plan was successful in reducing non-elective (emergency admissions) to hospital by 6.3% in the 2015 calendar year, against a target of 3.5%. In pursuit of independent living, 443 reablement packages were put in place in-year, against a target of 120, an increase of 320 from 2014/15. 71% of these achieved identified goals, in line with target. The Middlesbrough Sports Village (total cost £21.6m) was completed, providing a city-scale leisure facility for the town, and the Council established a Leisure Trust for the management of the Sports Village and other key leisure assets with Sport & Leisure Management (SLM) Ltd, enabling further investment in the portfolio over the next 15 years and saving the Council around £1.2m in annual running costs. The Council revised its long-term contractual for support services with Mouchel (now Kier), returning a number of services to Council management in-year with Kier retaining responsibility for council tax collection, housing benefit payment and pensions administration services. The arrangement has enabled the Council to 14

make significant savings from support services, and will result in at least 100 new jobs within Kier’s Middlesbrough operation in the period to 2020. Issues 



 

Key Stage 4 performance was very disappointing, and the Council is working with its partners in the Middlesbrough Achievement Partnership (MAP) and the Regional Schools Commissioner to address these issues, together with issues raised in relation to secondary attendance and exclusions. Looked After Children per 10,000 population increased from 115.1 in 2014/15 to 124.5 at year-end 2015/16, remaining around twice the national average level. The Council’s arrangements for the safeguarding of children were inspected by Ofsted in December 2015, and found to require improvement. An improvement plan responding to issues raised by Ofsted will be implemented, with progress tracked through the Council’s performance management framework from Quarter One 2016/17. Performance against key housing benefit targets, particularly in relation to appeals, was disappointing in 2015/16 and the Council will implement improvement plan with its provider in 2016/17. The Council experienced significant slippage (35%) in its capital programme during the year, resulting from poor weather conditions and major project delays, though this shortfall is still planned to be spent in future years. The Council has implemented a new Programme and Project Management Framework to ensure slippage is minimised in future years.

24. Following issues identified internally and with the Council’s internal and external auditors in relation to elements of corporate governance during 2014/15, the Council developed and implemented an improvement plan during 2015/16 and invited the Local Government Association to undertake a Corporate Peer Review of the Council in late 2015 to test its plan. 25. The review team identified many positives in the Council’s approach and its existing plans for improvement, including:       

strong political and senior management leadership and a workforce that has pride in and is committed to Middlesbrough; the ‘Middlesbrough is changing’ initiative, which communicates a fresh impetus for the town, and much progress in economic growth; the ‘outcome-based’ management structure that has been well-received by staff and is breaking down service ‘silos’; a management cohort that is positive about innovation and change, a well-regarded development programme in the ‘Middlesbrough Manager’ and staff that are empowered; strengths in financial stewardship, a track record in delivering savings, and plans in relation to performance, programme and project management are positive developments, though at an early stage; improved local partnership working and a strong, positive tradition of the Tees Valley authorities working together; streets that are clean, with little evidence of physical deprivation and a positive crime profile; 15

 

a clear early help and prevention strategy for children, and effective work has been undertaken with young people in terms of employability and reducing the numbers of NEETs; and the Council is self-aware and is able to accurately articulate its strengths and areas for development.

26. The review team made nine key recommendations for further improvement, as follows: Recommendation 1

Develop a strategic masterplan for the town that shapes your future investment and growth. This needs to be a medium to longer-term ambition and one that is developed and shared with key partners and stakeholders.

2

Re-align the 2020 vision to incorporate the Mayoral aspirations around issues such as culture.

3

Develop a Medium Term Financial Strategy that is linked to the 2020 vision timescales, that plans for opportunities and risk scenarios and that is supported by effective in-year financial reporting.

4

Review member level council wide governance including Member Scrutiny and Audit Committee.

5

Consider a greater ambition for Health and Social Care integration, including developing a prevention strategy for Adults and a sustainable approach to early intervention for children and families

6

Consider a partnership forum to investigate and explore reform of public services.

7

Further develop a consistent council wide approach to project, programme and risk management mindful of the balance between people, skills and processes.

8

Develop a strategic HR function to incorporate development of a Workforce Strategy and an integrated Employment Strategy.

9

Develop and implement an IT strategy to support change management incorporating agile working, improved financial and management information and channel shift of customer interactions and transactions.

27. The recommendations from the review confirm areas for improvement which the Council had already identified and are now being taken forward as part of a consolidated Council Improvement Plan. Key actions from the Council Improvement Plan will be delivered as part of this Strategic Plan. Medium-Term Financial Plan to 2020 28. The 2016/17 Local Government Finance Settlement, confirmed in February 2016, sets out the grant income local authorities will receive from the Government up to and including the financial year 2019/20, and for the first time offers authorities a four-year funding settlement, provided efficiencies to be achieved across this period are clear. 29. From the start of the current period of public sector austerity in 2010, the Council has argued strongly that multi-year settlements are essential to allow proper financial planning and a structured, transformational, approach to balancing its budget in the medium term. As such the Council intends to take up this offer and submit its 2016-20 Strategic Plan to the Department of Communities and Local Government as its fouryear ‘Efficiency Plan’, required by the Government to access this funding settlement. 30. Taking advantage of the four-year planning horizon, the Council has been able to completely refresh its Medium Term Financial Plan to: 

utilise accumulated balances to smooth out the savings required year-on-year, and to pump prime transformational activity; 16

 

address the savings requirement for 2018-20 through transformational efficiency initiatives managed through Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme; and focus investment on growing the town’s economic base to improve local prosperity and secure a robust and independent income stream to fund the Council’s services.

31. The refreshed Medium Term Financial Plan identifies a net savings requirement of £9.2m for the period 2017/18 to 2019/20 over and above those already approved by Council for this period, as set out below:

Spending pressures Government funding reductions Local funding increases Planned savings Budget gap Net savings requirement Use of reserves In-year budget position

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

Total £ms

9.6 6.8 -3.7 -11.5 1.2 0.0 -1.2 0.0

8.1 1.8 -3.3 -1.2 5.4 -4.6 -0.8 0.0

12.7 2.0 -3.4 -0.5 10.8 -4.6 -6.2 0.0

30.4 10.6 -10.4 -13.2 17.4 -9.2

32. A four-year financial settlement presents the Council with an opportunity to plan over a longer period to meet this savings requirement. While the Council will be a smaller organisation by 2020 than it is currently, a Strategic Plan focused on investment and efficiency, and creating growth in Council Tax, Business Rates and income from commercial activity, aims to minimise service-level and job reductions over this period. 33. The following assumptions have been applied in refreshing the Council’s Medium-Term Financial Plan. Government funding reductions 34. Government funding has been assumed to fall during the period to 2020: Funding Stream Revenue Support Grant Business Rates Top Up New Homes Bonus Housing Benefit Admin Grant Education Support Grant Public Health Grant Improved Better Care Fund Total:

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

21.05 22.24 2.780 0.796 0.776 17.230 0.749

16.53 22.90 2.897 0.646 0.550 16.461 3.854

11.96 23.63 3.139 0.496 0.336 15.731 6.561

65.621

63.838

61.853

17

Local funding increases 35. Local funding has been assumed to increase during the same period: Funding Stream Council Tax Core Council Tax: Adult Social Care Precept Local Share of Business Rates Total:

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

46.727 1.804 21.607 70.138

48.407 2.760 22.257 73.424

50.074 3.752 22.983 76.809

36. It has been assumed that the Council will increase Council Tax by 2% per annum and also apply the 2% Adult Social Care Precept (as introduced by Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne in the November 2015 Spending Review) in every year of the period to meet anticipated demand for social care. These assumptions are in line with the Government’s own assumptions within the Local Government Finance Settlement. Pay awards and inflation 37. A 1% annual pay award has been assumed. 38. Contractual inflation at a total cost of £5.1 million has been assumed in the period. No provision has been made for inflation for supplies and services, and it is expected any inflationary pressures in this area will be met from efficiency savings. 39. Income from fees and charges has been assumed to increase on average by 1%. This excludes car parking and statutory charges. Living Wage 40. In line with the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough, the Council is committed to ensuring that its lowest paid employees benefit from being paid the Living Wage Foundation hourly rate and a total of £3.0m has been provided over the period to fund this commitment. Living Wage Foundation provision Additional in-year Cumulative

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

0.300 0.300

1.100 1.400

1.600 3.000

41. In addition, increases in the rebranded minimum wage (the National Living Wage), will impact upon organisations – principally care providers – who are contracted to carry out functions on behalf of the Council. A further £3.0m has been allocated over the period to cover the increases in costs expected as a result of these pressures. National Living Wage (minimum wage) provision Additional in-year Cumulative

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

1.000 1.000

1.000 2.000

1.000 3.000

18

Demand pressures 42. The following assumptions have been made in relation to demand-led pressure within Safeguarding and Children’s Care and within Social Care. Safeguarding and Children’s Care – Net pressures Additional in-year Cumulative Social Care – Net pressures Additional in-year Cumulative

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

1.500 1.500

1.500 3.000

1.500 4.500

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

0.241 0.241

0.319 0.560

0.319 0.879

Investment Strategy 43. Over the period of the Strategic Plan the Council intends to invest £64.9m of its own resources in building the town’s economic base, driving financial self-sufficiency and transforming how the Council delivers its services. 44. This will be made up of £11.5m of identified revenue resources and £53.4m of Capital Investment. This will involve additional borrowing, which will have the following impact: Revenue cost of investment Additional in-year Cumulative

2017/18 £ms

2018/19 £ms

2019/20 £ms

0.300 0.300

0.000 0.300

0.300 0.600

45. It is estimated that the Investment Strategy will generate £0.9m per annum in income for the Council by 2019/20 from increased Council Tax and Business rates, with this expected to grow significantly in the years beyond 2020. 46. The Investment Strategy is appended to the Strategic Plan and will replace the Council’s current Capital Programme, subject to approval by Council. Other changes 47. A provision of £0.397m has been made for the impact of the Apprentice Levy which comes into force on 1 April 2017. Use of Reserves and Balances 48. Over the period to 2020, the Council plans to utilise £8.2m of its general balances in order to smooth the budget savings requirement. This will allow time to plan future savings effectively to ensure that there is the minimum possible impact on residents and service users. 49. Over the Medium-Term Financial Plan period, the Council intends to use £7.4m from its Change Fund in order to support transformational activity to deliver its Strategic Plan. 19

50. The Council also plans to use £10.5m of revenue balances, including £3.5m identified in the 2015/16 Outturn report, as part of its Investment Strategy. 51. The planned use of balances will reduce the Council’s General Fund balance to £4.5m by the end of the 2019/20 financial year, in line with the Council’s recommended General Fund level of £4.0-£4.5m. In addition, a review of earmarked reserves will significantly reduce the level of these balances held by the Council in the light of the reduced risk assessment allowed by a four-year funding settlement. Contingency 52. Following an assessment of the level of uncertainty within the Medium-Term Financial Plan, particularly in the areas of demand forecasting and the likely level of Business Rate appeals, an overall contingency of £1.2m per annum has been provided, replacing the discrete contingencies previously provided to Outcome Areas. 2015/16 Outturn 53. The 2015/16 Outturn reported budget savings in some Outcome Areas. These savings have been analysed and the recurring element reflected in the £13.2m of budget savings planned for future years. £3.5m identified in the 2015/16 Outturn report will be utilised to part fund the Investment Strategy to 2020. The Council’s Objectives to 2020 54. The Council’s key priorities in the period to 2020 are as follows:       

Working with partners in the Tees Valley Combined Authority to implement the Strategic Economic Plan, while ensuring that this delivers for Middlesbrough, as well as the Tees Valley as a whole. Implementing effective prevention and early help strategies to ensure that the demand on acute services is reduced. Developing and implementing an Integrated Care Organisation for the South Tees area to ensure the independence of vulnerable groups is maximised and their dependency on services is reduced. Implementing an improvement plan for children’s safeguarding to improve consistency in service delivery, embed effective performance management, and improve strategic partnership working in line with Ofsted’s recommendations. Implementing the Investment Strategy to build the town’s economic base, drive financial self-sufficiency and transform Council service delivery. Continuing to embed the Council’s Operating Model, resulting in a step change in customer focus, commissioning practice, digital services, and income generation. Implementing the Council Improvement Plan to ensure that the delivery of the Strategic Plan is supported by best-practice corporate governance processes.

  55. Specific priorities by Outcome Area are set out in a suite of eight Outcome Delivery Plans for the period to 2020, which underpin this Strategic Plan. A high-level summary of Outcome Delivery Plans is at Annex 2, and the Council’s Strategic Risk Register, setting out current risks to the achievement of outcomes, mitigated by this Strategic Plan and supporting risk plans, is at Annex 3. 20

Further development 56. The Council will continue to identify and exploit opportunities for transformation efficiencies throughout the period to 2020. 57. Since 2013, the Council has developed and implemented a Change Programme to meet the unprecedented savings challenges it has faced during this period, while at the same time maximising the Council’s contribution to strategic objectives for Middlesbrough. 58. The Change Programme has been very effective in delivering efficiencies and transformational change within the Council, delivering £52.5m savings to date and driving service modernisation and new management practices, in line with the Council’s new operating model. 59. Nevertheless, there remains more to do to embed the Council’s operating model, and the Council will continue to transform in order to maximise opportunities presented by the Tees Valley Combined Authority and associated partnership arrangements. 60. Opportunities for further transformational efficiencies in the period to 2020 are considered to lie within the following broad thematic areas:     

Growing Our Economic Base; Partnership and Integration; Online and Self-Serve; Value for Money; and Return on Investment.

61. While the Council already has plans in place in relation to the above, a further, intensive period of analysis will be undertaken during summer 2016 with the aim of identifying potential further efficiencies within these thematic areas for the 2018-20 period. The output from this process will be presented for Council consideration in November 2016 in the draft first annual refresh of this 2016-20 Strategic Plan, which will also incorporate budget profiles and key measures of success for each Outcome Area following the conclusion of current public consultation on the delivery of the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough. Managing Performance 62. Performance against the priorities and targets set out in the Strategic Plan will be tracked through the Council’s Performance and Risk Management Framework. 63. The Council operates an integrated programme of quarterly clinics, through which performance at all levels of the organisation will be reviewed, issues and risks identified, mitigations put in place, and plans revised as appropriate. This process is outlined in the graphic below. 64. A consolidated report on performance in the quarter will be considered by LMT no later than six weeks after quarter end. Following this, LMT will update their Executive Portfolio holders on any performance issues arising from the process and plans that

21

are in place to address these issues. The report will then be considered by Overview and Scrutiny Board prior to presentation to Executive. 65. In addition to this, progress against key programmes and projects will be monitored on a monthly basis, and reported formally to the Corporate Programmes Board on a bimonthly basis, in line with the Council’s Programme and Project Management Framework.

22

Annex 1: Investment Strategy Summary Total Funding Required

Outcome 1: Economic Development

>£1.0m Major Schemes

<£1.0m Large Schemes

<£100k Small Schemes

Outcome

Capacity Schemes

Statutory Schemes

2016/2017

2017/20 18

2018/2019

2019/2020

TOTAL

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

25,721

20,791

500

-

47,012

778

3,262

38,813

4,159

-

Outcome 2: Supporting Communities

17

-

-

-

17

17

-

-

-

-

Outcome 3: Improving Public Health

750

-

-

-

750

-

750

-

-

-

Outcome 4: Learning and Skills

4,927

325

-

-

5,252

754

-

-

4,498

-

Outcome 6: Social Care

2,705

60

-

-

2,765

155

412

-

50

2,148

Outcome 7: Environment, Property and Commercial Services

5,174

145

60

60

5,439

959

439

1,017

3,024

-

Outcome 8: Finance, Governance and Support

5,437

-

-

-

5,437

69

232

-

5,136

-

44,731

21,321

560

60

66,672

2,732

5,095

39,830

16,867

2,148

3,787

9,705

9,049

13,941

36,482

-

1,511

15,100

14,486

5,385

48,518

31,026

9,609

14,001

103,154

2,732

6,606

54,930

31,353

7,533

Total: Existing Investment Projects Total: New Investment Projects Total: Investment Funding Required

Council Funding Borrowing

10,156

2,601

1,250

3,999

18,006

Capital Receipts

17,090

7,566

3,410

6,182

34,248

2,603

4,894

3,814

185

11,496

29,849

15,061

8,474

10,366

63,750

17,623

10,156

250

1,750

29,779

Direct Revenue Financing Total Council Funding

External Funding Grants Contributions

1,046

5,809

885

1,885

9,625

Total External Funding

18,669

15,965

1,135

3,635

39,404

Total Funding

48,518

31,026

9,609

14,001

103,154

23

Detail of schemes Total Funding Required Scheme

Council Funding

External Funding

2016/2017

2017/20 18

2018/2019

2019/2020

TOTAL

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

Existing Investment Projects Outcome 1: Economic Development BoHo 5

203

-

-

-

203

-

203

57

-

-

-

57

-

57

154

-

-

-

154

154

-

Baker Street Phase 2

53

-

-

-

53

53

-

Town Centre Monitoring & WIFI

50

-

-

-

50

50

-

Middlehaven Dock Bridge

2,953

6,490

-

-

9,443

2,511

6,932

Site Assembly at Middlehaven

1,302

-

-

-

1,302

215

1,087

TWI Phase1 Tackling Town Centre Vacancies

Hemlington Grange Electrical Connection Holiday Inn Express Hotel Extension Loan Town Square Public Art Town Hall Venue Development

726

727

-

-

1,453

1,453

-

1,250

-

-

-

1,250

1,250

-

90

-

-

-

90

-

90

3,170

3,180

-

-

6,350

3,077

3,273

Town Hall HLF \ Arts Council Project

500

811

-

-

1,311

811

500

Captain Cook Museum

500

-

-

-

500

-

500

Beacon Becks

27

-

-

-

27

-

27

Beacon Becks Phase 2

17

-

-

-

17

-

17

Capitalisation of Major Scheme Salaries

140

-

-

-

140

140

-

Affordable Housing Via Section 106

100

5,154

-

-

5,254

830

4,424

Prissick Sports (Section 106)

50

-

-

-

50

-

50

100

-

-

-

100

-

100

Bonnygrove Park and Fairydell (Section 106)

12

-

-

-

12

-

12

Tees Valley Metro

10

-

-

-

10

-

10

9

-

-

-

9

-

9

750

1,147

-

-

1,897

-

1,897

Nunthorpe Playing Fields (Section 106)

Transporter Bridge Development Stage Two HLF Highways Infrastructure Development (Section 106)

24

Total Funding Required Scheme

Council Funding

External Funding

2016/2017

2017/20 18

2018/2019

2019/2020

TOTAL

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

Surface Water Management

146

-

-

-

146

-

146

Town Centre Improvements Public Realm

144

-

-

-

144

144

-

Flood & Coastal Erosion Risk Management

145

-

-

-

145

-

145

24

-

-

-

24

-

24

Swedish Mission site S106 Works Street Lighting (Invest to Save)

2,500

-

-

-

2,500

2,500

-

Southfield Road Paving

61

-

-

-

61

-

61

Labs Vehicle

21

-

-

-

21

21

-

Saltersgill Fields Flood Prevention Preparatory Work Stepping Stone (S106) St Hilda's Grove Hill J V - Palladium Shops Gresham

20

-

-

-

20

-

20

270

-

-

-

270

-

270

54

-

-

-

54

54

-

130

-

-

-

130

-

130

4,460

-

-

-

4,460

4,460

-

House to Home

249

-

-

-

249

249

-

Housing Delivery Vehicle (S106)

800

-

-

-

800

-

800

Empty Homes 2015-18

404

320

-

-

724

-

724

LTP - Block Budget Traffic Management

10

-

-

-

10

-

10

LTP - Corridor Review Programme

75

-

-

-

75

-

75

LTP - PROW 10 Year Plan

6

-

-

-

6

-

6

LTP - PROW Roscoe Street

2

-

-

-

2

-

2

30

-

-

-

30

-

30

2,425

1,862

-

-

4,287

-

4,287

LTP - Pedestrian Crossings 2014/15 LTP - Unallocated Grant Highway Infrastructure

684

-

-

-

684

684

-

Highways Maintenance

838

600

-

-

1,438

1,438

-

-

500

500

-

1,000

1,000

-

25,721

20,791

500

-

47,012

21,094

25,918

Town Centre Accommodation Strategy Total: Outcome 1: Economic Development

25

Total Funding Required Scheme

Council Funding

External Funding

2016/2017

2017/20 18

2018/2019

2019/2020

TOTAL

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

Libraries IT Software Upgrade

7

-

-

-

7

7

-

Acklam Library (Section 106)

10

-

-

-

10

-

10

Total: Outcome 2: Supporting Communities

17

-

-

-

17

7

10

Dundas House: Health and Wellbeing Hub

750

-

-

-

750

-

750

Total: Outcome 3: Improving Public Health

750

-

-

-

750

-

750

BB (Grant) Devolved Formula Capital

443

-

-

-

443

-

443

BB (Grant) Securing Services for Children with Complex Needs

420

-

-

-

420

-

420

BB (Grant) EFA Early Years 2 Year olds Entitlement (Trajectory Project)

168

-

-

-

168

-

168

BB (MBC COPR) Supported Capital Expenditure Formula Funding

1,188

-

-

-

1,188

1,188

-

BB (Grant) LA Capital Maintenance & Basic Needs

1,576

325

-

-

1,901

550

1,351

5

-

-

-

5

-

5

16

-

-

-

16

-

16

£000's

Outcome 2: Supporting Communities

Outcome 3: Improving Public Health

Outcome 4: Learning and Skills

Spencerfield Road - Adaptations to Rented MBC Property for Short Breaks Ayresome Primary - Structural, Stonework & Brick Repairs Linthorpe Primary - Early years KS1 & KS2 New Build

131

-

-

-

131

-

131

Breckon Hill Primary - Early Years KS1 Ext. & Alterations Kitchen Vent. System

3

-

-

-

3

-

3

The Avenue Primary - Update Outdoor Play Area - Early Years

2

-

-

-

2

-

2

32

-

-

-

32

-

32

Abingdon Primary - Production Kitchen Extraction Replacement

8

-

-

-

8

8

-

Park End Primary - Production Kitchen Extraction Replacement

15

-

-

-

15

15

-

23

-

-

-

23

-

Hemlington Initiative Centre / Rosendale - Cont. to Bldg. Renovation - Early Years

Thorntree Primary - Condition Project (various works) Park End Primary - Roof Window & Door Replacement

-

-

-

23

1

-

-

-

1

-

1

Netherfields CC / Priory Woods Special – Post-16 Project

28

-

-

-

28

28

-

Hemlington Primary Academy - Internal Alterations & IAU Extension

13

-

-

-

13

1

12

Pallister Park - Extension & Internal Alterations

24

-

-

-

24

-

24

26

Total Funding Required Scheme

Council Funding

External Funding

2016/2017

2017/20 18

2018/2019

2019/2020

TOTAL

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

4

-

-

-

4

4

-

Archibald - Nursery Internal Alterations

13

-

-

-

13

13

-

Inc - Berwick Hills - Community / Learning Lodge

48

-

-

-

48

24

24

8

-

-

-

8

3

5

Inc - Whinney Banks - Boiler Works

29

-

-

-

29

9

20

The Avenue - Boiler Works

14

-

-

-

14

-

14

Park House

21

-

-

-

21

21

-

Beech Grove - SEN Project

46

-

-

-

46

46

-

Captain Cook Primary School - Roof Work

39

-

-

-

39

-

39

3

-

-

-

3

-

3

Newport Primary - Classroom

41

-

-

-

41

21

20

Marton Manor - Roof

Inc - Park End - Refurbishment of Classroom & Various Works In 2015

Inc - Whinney Banks - Window Replacement

Holmwood Kitchen - Extraction Unit

13

-

-

-

13

-

13

Holmwood - Structural Elements

6

-

-

-

6

-

6

Archibald - Structural Elements

10

-

-

-

10

-

10

Pallister Park - Roof

80

-

-

-

80

12

68

7

-

-

-

7

-

7

Acklam Whin - Drainage

37

-

-

-

37

-

37

Priory Woods - Library Extension

94

-

-

-

94

67

27

2

-

-

-

2

2

-

60

-

-

-

60

56

4

1

-

-

-

1

-

1

Park End - Roof

Kader - Windows Brambles Farm - Servery Improvements Ayresome Primary Schools - Work to Sub Main Cable Lingfield - Ceiling Refurbishment Abingdon Primary - Children's CT Internal Alterations & Improvements Thorntree - Drainage Improvements Total: Outcome 4: Learning and Skills

37

-

-

-

37

-

37

247

-

-

-

247

202

45

17

-

-

-

17

-

17

4,927

325

-

-

5,252

2,270

2,982

27

Total Funding Required Scheme

Council Funding

External Funding

2016/2017

2017/20 18

2018/2019

2019/2020

TOTAL

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

584

-

-

-

584

584

-

1,564

-

-

-

1,564

-

1,564

Outcome 6: Social Care Chronically Sick & Disabled Persons Act Disabled Facilities Grant Capitalisation of Staying Put Agency Salaries Home Assistance Loan Home Loans Partnership (formerly 5 Lamps) Levick Court – Windows / Mural / Adaptations

50

-

-

-

50

50

-

154

60

-

-

214

180

34

26

-

-

-

26

-

26

6

-

-

-

6

-

6

MICC replacement beds

17

-

-

-

17

-

17

Cumberland Resource Conservatory

84

-

-

-

84

-

84

Albert Park Pavilion Refurbishment Winter Warmth Xtra Telecare for reablement Total: Outcome 6: Social Care

198

-

-

-

198

-

198

15

-

-

-

15

-

15

7

-

-

-

7

-

7

2,705

60

-

-

2,765

814

1,951

Outcome 7: Environment, Property and Commercial Services Invest to Save Carbon Reduction Unallocated

216

-

-

-

216

216

-

Metz Bridge Travellers Site

19

-

-

-

19

-

19

Stewart Park Heritage Lottery Fund Delivery Stage (Ph2)

27

-

-

-

27

-

27

Sports Pitches /Facilities Section 106 Play Facilities - Kader / Brookfield Section 106 MUGA Kader / Brookfield Section 106 Middlesbeck & Millennium Green Section 106 Hemlington Recreation Ground Section 106

89

-

-

-

89

-

89

209

-

-

-

209

-

209

27

-

-

-

27

-162

189

100

-

-

-

100

100

-

30

-

-

-

30

-

30

Purchase of New Vehicles

959

-

-

-

959

959

-

Capitalisation of Wheelie Bin Replacement

100

-

-

-

100

100

-

55

-

-

-

55

55

-

Capitalisation of Highway Maintenance

275

-

-

-

275

275

-

Cargo Fleet Investment

180

-

-

-

180

180

-

Capitalisation of Street Furniture / Dog Fouling & Litter Bins

28

Total Funding Required Scheme

Council Funding

External Funding

2016/2017

2017/20 18

2018/2019

2019/2020

TOTAL

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

Property Services Building Investment

290

-

-

-

290

290

-

Central Lodge Stewart Park

270

-

-

-

270

270

-

62

20

-

-

82

82

-

Middlesbrough Sports Village

130

-

-

-

130

-274

404

Urgent Works Block Budget

223

-

-

-

223

223

-

9

-

-

-

9

9

-

592

-

-

-

592

592

-

Bereavement Services

UW - MICC Critical Compliance & Investment Works - Block Budget - Uncommitted CCIW - Beresford Building Ext Fabric

16

-

-

-

16

16

-

9

-

-

-

9

9

-

CCIW - Accessibility Thorntree Hub

23

-

-

-

23

20

3

CCIW - Municipal Buildings

61

-

-

-

61

61

-

CCIW - Fire Audit Works

CCIW - Stewart Park CCIW – Nature’s World Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy

5

-

-

-

5

5

-

26

-

-

-

26

26

-

1,017

-

-

-

1,017

1,017

-

Parks Improvement

40

40

-

-

80

80

-

Play Ground Equipment

25

25

-

-

50

50

-

Members Small Schemes

90

60

60

60

270

270

-

5,174

145

60

60

5,439

4,469

970

630

-

-

-

630

630

-

7

-

-

-

7

7

-

69

-

-

-

69

69

-

Total: Outcome 7: Environment, Property and Commercial Services

Outcome 8: Finance, Governance and Support ICT Infrastructure Biz Talk WIFI - Town Hall Civic Centre IT Investment - Block Budget

2,473

-

-

-

2,473

2,473

-

IT Refresh - Mobile Working Implementation

15

-

-

-

15

15

-

IT Refresh - WAN

20

-

-

-

20

20

-

IT Refresh - Agresso IT Refresh - ECAF

232

-

-

-

232

232

-

4

-

-

-

4

4

-

29

Total Funding Required Scheme

Council Funding

External Funding

2016/2017

2017/20 18

2018/2019

2019/2020

TOTAL

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

IT Refresh - Email Exchange

18

-

-

-

18

18

-

IT Refresh - Integrated Children's Systems

16

-

-

-

16

16

-

IT Refresh - CRM

359

-

-

-

359

359

-

IT Refresh - Town Hall Data Centre Build

292

-

-

-

292

292

-

IT Refresh - Wireless Phase 2

60

-

-

-

60

60

-

IT Refresh - Network Refresh

2

-

-

-

2

2

-

IT Refresh - Unified Comms / VoIP upgrade

81

-

-

-

81

81

-

IT Refresh - Firewall upgrade

48

-

-

-

48

48

-

180

-

-

-

180

180

-

IT Refresh - Server Refresh / Internet upgrade IT Refresh - Switch upgrade

63

-

-

-

63

63

-

IT Refresh - Scanning

300

-

-

-

300

300

-

IT Refresh - Objective Phase 4 onwards

300

-

-

-

300

300

-

IT Refresh - GIS Tech Forge Tees Valley Broadband Total: Outcome 8: Finance, Governance and Support

Total Existing Investment Projects (A)

4

-

-

-

4

4

-

264

-

-

-

264

264

-

5,437

-

-

-

5,437

5,437

-

44,731

21,321

560

60

66,672

34,091

32,581

30

Total Funding Required Scheme

Council Funding

External Funding

2016/2017

2017/20 18

2018/2019

2019/2020

TOTAL

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

Outcome 1: Capitalisation of Economic Growth

-

140

140

140

420

420

-

Outcome 6: Capitalisation of salaries - Financial Assistance (Staying Put)

-

50

50

50

150

150

-

Outcome 7: Capitalisation of former revenue-funded wheelie bins

-

100

100

100

300

300

-

Outcome 7: Capitalisation of former revenue-funded highways maintenance

-

275

275

275

825

825

-

New Investment Projects Continuation of capitalisation projects

Outcome 7: Capitalisation of former revenue-funded streetscene

-

55

55

55

165

165

-

Outcome 7: Capitalisation of former revenue-funded building maintenance

-

290

290

290

870

870

-

Total: Continuation of capitalisation projects

-

910

910

910

2,730

2,730

-

-

570

610

610

1,790

1,790

-

Continuation of legislative and other projects Outcome 6: Financial Assistance - Chronically Sick & Disabled Pers. Act Outcome 6: Disabled Facilities Grant and Assistance Loans

-

1,185

1,225

1,185

3,595

940

2,655

489

1,489

1,489

1,489

4,956

4,956

-

-

1,300

1,350

1,350

4,000

4,000

-

489

4,544

4,674

4,634

14,341

11,686

2,655

Outcome 1: Hemlington Grange Business Park

-

-

500

3,000

3,500

1,500

2,000

Outcome 1: Town Hall Lighting Scheme

-

-

410

-

410

410

-

Outcome 1: Cultural transformation

-

-

-

2,000

2,000

1,000

1,000

750

750

750

750

3,000

3,000

-

-

250

-

-

250

250

-

Outcome 7: Fleet Replacement Outcome 7: Critical Compliance & Investment Works & Urgent Works Total: Continuation of legislative and other projects

Other investment projects

Outcome 1: Town Centre Investment Pot Outcome 1: Hemlington Grange - Extra Care Housing Contribution Outcome 1: Teesside Media & Innovation Village

-

-

500

500

1,000

1,000

-

Outcome 1: Housing Growth

300

700

500

500

2,000

2,000

-

Outcome 1: University Quarter - Linthorpe Road Acquisition. & Highways / Public Realm

250

1,050

-

1,000

2,300

2,300

-

Outcome 7: Derisking Sites

400

400

400

100

1,300

1,300

-

-

371

-

-

371

371

-

500

-

-

-

500

500

-

Outcome 7: Purchase of Former County Depot Outcome 7: Critical Compliance & Investment Works - Refurbishment of Children's Homes

31

Total Funding Required Scheme

Council Funding

External Funding

2016/2017

2017/20 18

2018/2019

2019/2020

TOTAL

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

£000's

-

480

-

-

480

480

-

Outcome 8: The Big Screen

250

250

-

-

500

500

-

Outcome 8: ICT Projects

848

-

405

547

1,800

1,800

-

Total: Other Investment projects

3,298

4,251

3,465

8,397

19,411

16,411

3,000

Total New Investment Projects (B)

3,787

9,705

9,049

13,941

36,482

30,827

5,655

48,518

31,026

9,609

14,001

103,154

64,918

38,236

Outcome 7: Purchase of Thirteen Depot

Total Investment (A) + (B)

32

Annex 2: Summary Outcome Delivery Plans

1

Economic Development

Current Service Portfolio: 

Economic Growth service, comprising cultural services, economic development, housing and major regeneration projects.



Transport and Infrastructure service, comprising highways strategy, car parking, public and community transport and street lighting.



Planning service, comprising planning policy, development control and building control.

Contribution to a Fairer, Safer, Stronger Middlesbrough: The Economic Development Outcome Area works with partners within Middlesbrough, the wider Tees Valley and beyond to drive step change in Middlesbrough’s economic prosperity. The Outcome Area will make a significant contribution to the Fairer and Stronger themes of the Vision for Middlesbrough by creating local employment opportunities and facilitating and overseeing economic and cultural development, physical regeneration and housing growth within the town. In doing this the Outcome Area will also generate significant income for the Council from Council Tax, New Homes Bonus and Business Rates. Progress to date:

Plans for 2016-20: Within the context and parameters of the Tees Valley Combined Authority and Devolution Deal, priorities within the 2016-20 period are as follows:

The Outcome Area was established in 2014/15. The focus to date has been: 

establishing a service delivery structure aligning the planning and delivery of place and economic growth;



working with partners to deliver the Tees Valley Strategic Economic Plan;



working with partners to develop a Tees Valley Combined Authority, Devolution Deal and Strategic Economic Plan;



delivering the Council’s Economic Growth Investment Strategy;



developing and implementing the Middlesbrough is Changing initiative to improve perceptions of the town and stimulate inward investment;



progressing the development of key regeneration sites such as Middlehaven;



transforming transport links in line with the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough;



developing and implementing a housebuilding programme for Middlesbrough;





progressing major development sites development of the town centre; and

continuing to promote Middlesbrough as an investment opportunity, place to live and study, and visitor destination;





building on this to develop an Economic Growth Investment Strategy for the town.

developing the cultural sector within Middlesbrough, working with key partners, including Teesside University, and ensuring that cultural services provided directly by the Council operate in a more commercial manner;



delivering a major highways investment programme to significantly improve the condition of roads, footways and verges;



developing and implementing a masterplan for the railway station area; and



improving programme and project management within the service to ensure that value for money and return on investment is maximised.

such

as

Middlehaven,

and

the

Progress to 2015/16 has been positive with significant successes in the town centre (including the Holiday Inn Express, Baker and Bedford Streets), the ongoing redevelopment of Middlehaven and the Council’s housebuilding programme.

33

Milestones Economic Growth

2016/17        

Transport and Infrastructure

   

Planning

    

2017/18

Strategic Masterplan for Investment developed. Planning application for Middlehaven Snow Centre approved. Holiday Inn extension completed. Baker / Bedford Sts fully-occupied. Orange Pip Food market open. Town Hall refurbishment commenced. Future model for Cultural Services agreed.

 

Future model for Transport and Infrastructure agreed. Commission development of Middlesbrough Rail Station Masterplan. Commence Civil Engineering works for Middlehaven Dock Bridge and associated infrastructure. Completion of LED street lighting conversion Programme.



600 housing units completed. Masterplan for Newham Hall adopted. Masterplan for Nunthorpe adopted. Masterplan for Brookfield adopted. S.106 Framework reviewed.

 

 

Premier Inn Hotel open. Commence first phase of Teesside Media & Innovation Village BoHo 5 fully occupied and BoHos 1 and 5 self-financing. Refurbished Town Hall opens.

2018/19      

  

£10m highways investment programme completed. Completion of Civil Engineering works for Middlehaven Dock Bridge and associated infrastructure. Commence preliminary design and planning applications approvals for Stainton Way Westward Extension Commence preliminary design and planning applications approvals for Ladgate Lane to Longlands. 600 housing units completed. Disposal of Coulby Newham site commences.

 

  

2019/20

Middlehaven Snow Centre opens. Gresham redevelopment commences. Hemlington Grange housing site commences. Hemlington Grange Business Park construction commences Improvements to Albert Road South completed. Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Delivery of local highway infrastructure to major housing developments Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



600 housing units completed. New Local Plan adopted. Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

 





First phase of Teesside Media & Innovation Village completed. Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

Direct Middlesbrough to London rail service commences. Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

600 housing units completed. Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

34

2

Supporting Communities

Current Service Portfolio: 

Stronger Communities service, comprising Environment City, community infrastructure, libraries and archives, community safety, advice services and the Troubled Families initiative.



Stronger Families services, comprising targeted support for individuals and families, and school readiness.



North East Migration Partnership, managing the relationship between the Home Office and local authorities in the North East around asylum and migration issues.

Contribution to a Fairer, Safer, Stronger Middlesbrough: The Supporting Communities Outcome Area works with local communities and partners within Middlesbrough, the wider Tees Valley and beyond to develop and implement a coherent preventative strategy that ultimately reduces demand on acute safeguarding, social care and other public services. The Outcome Area will make a signficant contribution to the Fairer and Safer themes of the Vision for Middlesbrough by reducing poor parenting; reducing domestic abuse; reducing the impact of drug and alcohol abuse; and improving the employability of local people. Progress to date: The Outcome Area was established in 2014/15. The focus to date has been:

Plans for 2016-20: Priorities within the 2016-20 period are as follows:



establishing a fit-for-purpose service delivery structure for early help;





establishing community level infrastructure that facilitates early stage preventative activity;

embed an effective early help approach to reduce the number of children and young people requiring acute service interventions;



embed a co-ordinated approach between agencies, based around a core child entitlement, to improve levels of nursery and school readiness;



establishing robust assessment, data collection and data sharing arrangements to enable effective targeting of individuals and families;



re-establish the Children & Young People’s Partnership to provide effective leadership for the 019 agenda;



identifying and developing appropriate partnerships and interventions for the key issues to be addressed by the Outcome Area; and,



work closely with education providers to increase the number of young people appropriately prepared for the labour market;





ensuring effective monitoring of progress and demonstration of problems averted.

establish a clear offer across Community Hubs, Children’s Centres and Central Library to improve literacy levels of children and families;



ensure each Community Hub is working towards long-term community management / ownership;



rationalise commissioning to ensure effective targeting of advice services on priority families /groups



develop joint/shared services with other partners to tackle issues such as anti-social behaviour, domestic abuse and radicalisation; and



embed Selective Landlord Licensing in Inner Middlesbrough to reduce the long-term demand on public services.

Progress to 2015/16 has been positive as demonstrated by the LGA Early Help Peer Review, feedback from Corporate Peer Review and recent Ofsted inspections. The Outcome Area has developed a cohesive offer, which now needs to be embedded and begin to demonstrate sustained impact on acute services.

35

Milestones Stronger Communities

Stronger Families

2016/17 

Combined (and incrementally reducing) contract for homelessness service, based on early help principles in place.



Combined contract for advice provision and advice network development in place.



Effective Community Safety Partnership arrangements in place.



School readiness service focusing on children and parents identified as being at risk.

 

Revised CYPP in place. Multi-agency Youth Employment Group taking collective responsibility for NEETs.

2017/18 

Merged Community Safety arrangements in place.



Portfolio of Community Hubs increasingly run by local community organisations, providing spaces for multi-agency delivery. Modernised library service driving up literacy standards for children and families in place.



 



All Children’s Centres rated as Good or Outstanding by Ofsted. Case management approach and targeting fully reflecting safeguarding demand pressures. Approach to encouraging employability provision embedded in schools to reduce NEETs.

2018/19

2019/20



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

36

3

Improving Public Health

Current Service Portfolio: 

Public Protection service, comprising emergency planning, environmental protection, environmental health, trading standards and licensing.



Public Health service, comprising health protection, health service quality and health improvement, and health development.

Contribution to a Fairer, Safer, Stronger Middlesbrough: The Improving Public Health Outcome Area works with local communities and partners within Middlesbrough, the wider Tees Valley and beyond to develop and implement a coherent preventative strategy that ultimately reduces demand on acute health services, and to protect the public from environmental hazards. The Outcome Area will make a significant contribution to the Fairer and Safer themes of the Vision for Middlesbrough by tackling the preventable causes of disease and illness including delayed or late presentation to health services, and lifestyle risk factors and so contributing to increased disability-free life expectancy and reduced health inequalities within Middlesbrough. Progress to date: The responsibility for improving public health passed from the NHS to local authorities in 2013, providing the Council with the opportunity to lead in improving the health and wellbeing of local communities. The focus to date has been:

Plans for 2016-20: Within the context and parameters of the NHS Five Year Forward View process, priorities within the 2016-20 period are as follows: 



establishing a fit-for-purpose service delivery structure within the Council, bringing together transferred public functions with the regulatory, legislative, enforcement and licensing levers offered by the Public Protection service;



successfully adopting and redesigning school nursing and health visitor services;



ensuring joined-up working between services within the Council to create a ‘Whole Council’ approach to public health and reviewing commissioned services to integrate delivery and improve efficiency and value for money;



developing stronger strategic and operational partnership working with other agencies to maximise the collective effort in improving public health; and





strengthening community engagement in the public health agenda, and progressing more integrated public health services, delivered in the community and building on community assets.



Progress to 2015/16 has been positive with a review of the Health and Wellbeing Board completed, and the majority of public health service contracts reviewed and performing to target, however there needs to be a greater focus on prevention and early intervention to improve the health of the overall population and demands on the NHS.



shifting focus and investment across all agencies to prevention and early intervention services, across all age groups, using the life-course approach (best start in life, develop well, live well in adulthood and age well), while maintaining a targeted approach to vulnerable groups experiencing poor health outcomes; improving community engagement and assertive outreach models characterised by vibrant and active community hubs, an effective social prescribing model leading to improved uptake of preventative services, and improved and coordinated use of local assets; coordinating public health capacity at all levels (community settings, workplace and organisations) to reduce demand for reactive health and social care services; and developing efficient, integrated and effective models of service delivery with a stronger focus on community needs and community based models of delivery.

37

Milestones Public Health

2016/17 

   

Public Protection



2017/18

Robust strategic and operational partnership working for improving public health in place (including a revised Health and Wellbeing Board). Integrated 0-19 services model in place. Adult Prevention Strategy developed and implementation of this commenced. Health and Wellbeing Hub opens. Plan to ensure Middlesbrough achieves Dementia-friendly community status implemented.



Review of service standards completed, focusing work on areas with a core legal remedy.



 

2018/19

2019/20

Public Health services fully recommissioned to align with community needs as identified in Joint Strategic Needs Assessment. Sustainable model of delivering PH programmes in place. Local market for PH services will be better developed, particularly in relation to VCS providers.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

Strong multi-agency approach to alcohol and food control in place.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

38

4

Learning and Skills

Current Service Portfolio: 

Access to Education service, comprising school placement planning, admissions and attendance.



Achievement service, comprising Middlesbrough Achievement Partnership, school improvement and employability / adult learning.



SEN and Vulnerable Learners service, comprising SEN, Cleveland Unit, Vulnerable Learners, Sensory Impairment and Complementary Education.

Contribution to a Fairer, Safer, Stronger Middlesbrough: The Learning and Skills Outcome Area works with schools, other education providers and key partners to improve educational outcomes for all children and adults in Middlesbrough. The Outcome Area will make a signficant contribution to the Fairer theme of the Vision for Middlesbrough by enabling children, young people and adults to develop the necessary skills to access further education, employment or training. Progress to date: The Outcome Area has been in place since 2013/14. The focus to date has been:

Plans for 2016-20: Priorities within the 2016-20 period are as follows:



implementing a robust and effective approach to promoting school improvement following Ofsted inspection in 2014 that judged the Council’s approach as ineffective;



continuing to support the Middlesbrough Achievement Partnership to improve educational outcomes for children and young people in Middlesbrough;



supporting the development of the Middlesbrough Achievement Partnership of local schools;



continuing to work with partners to improve the employability of young people and adults, utilising the Community Learning Service;



developing and providing and effective support offer for local schools; and





working with the Supporting Communities Outcome Area on school readiness and employability.

reviewing the future role of the Outcome Area in light of changes to national policy changes to education and implement changes to ensure that the Council continues to support improved attainment as a driver of economic growth.

Progress to 2015/16 has in general been positive, with Ofsted advising that the Council had made signficant improvements in 2015. Nevertheless, the Council and

its partners face a signficant challenge in enabling improving educational outcomes against a backdrop of significant local deprivation and radical, ongoing national policy changes to education and 2015 Key Stage 4 results were disappointing, though performance at EYFS and Key Stage 2 is at the targeted level.

39

Milestones Outcome Area overall



Outcome Area and it service provision reviewed in light of Education Act.

2016/17

Access to Education



Planning for future school placements completed.

2017/18  

Achievement

 

Five-Year Middlesbrough Achievement Partnership Strategy in place. School Effectiveness Strategy revised to align with Middlesbrough Achievement Partnership Plan.

  

SEN and Vulnerable Learners

 

Revised SEND and Vulnerable Learners Strategy in place. All learners with EHC Plans.

  

2018/19

2019/20

Sufficient school placements for all Middlesbrough children in place. Enhanced support service offer in place, allowing best practice to be shared amongst subscribing schools.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

Well-established MAP working alongside teaching school alliances and fulfilling school improvements. Enhanced support and challenge for secondary schools and academies in place. Courses offered by Community Learning reviewed to ensure alignment with 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

Robust assessment and review framework in place to ensure VFM. Ed Psych provision reviewed, with capacity increased to support targeted provision. Hub and spoke model in place in place for Cleveland Unit providing a service that operates all year round.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

40

5

Safeguarding and Children’s Care

Current Service Portfolio: 

Safeguarding Services, comprising first contact services, assessment and care planning.



Support and Development service, comprising home support, contact and family teams, resource team, Gleneagles, Fir Tree, Holly Lodge and Rose Croft.



Intervention Services, comprising assessment and care planning and training, development and research.



South Tees Youth Offending Service, comprising Middlesbrough and Redcar teams and resource and development team.



Specialist Services, comprising CWD, Pathways, Looked After Children, Families Forward, family Placement and adoption and fostering.



Risk and Reduction service, focusing on reducing teenage conceptions and substance misuse.

Contribution to a Fairer, Safer, Stronger Middlesbrough: The Safeguarding and Children’s Care Outcome Area works with all stakeholders to ensure that vulnerable children and young people are safeguarded from intentional and unintentional harm, and as such will make a signficant contribution to the Safer theme of the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough. Progress to date: The Outcome Area has been in place since 2013/14. The focus to date has been:

Plans for 2016-20: Priorities within the 2016-20 period are as follows:



working with the Supporting Communities Outcome Area to develop a robust early help offer that reduces contacts with safeguarding;





improving commissioning practice within the Outcome Area, specifically in relation to demand projections and unit cost management;

developing and implementing a Post-Ofsted Inspection Improvement Plan to improve consistency in service delivery, embed effective performance management, and improve strategic partnership working in line with Ofsted’s recommendations;



reducing expenditure on costly external residential placements, in particular ‘out of area’ placements;



further developing the LCS system and implementing Controcc to improve commissioning within the Outcome Area;



reducing social worker turnover and transforming social work practice and supporting processes within the Outcome Area.



developing and implementing a multi-agency safeguarding Hub for South Tees;



developing and implementing Return to Middlesbrough and Residential Care Strategies; and



leading and implementing a Tees Valley Adoption Service.

The Outcome Area continues to face a number of challenges. Looked After Children

per 10,000 population has continued to increase to the end of 2015/16, remaining around twice the national average level. The Council’s arrangements for the safeguarding of children were inspected by Ofsted in December 2015, and found to require improvement, though inspectors we clear that children and young people in Middlesbrough are kept safe by the Council.

.

41

Milestones Outcome Area overall

2016/17        

Develop and implement Post-Ofsted Improvement Plan. Streamlined management structure in place and service review completed. Workforce strategy in place to limit turnover of key staff. Controcc implemented to enable improved commissioning practice. Multi-agency Safeguarding Hub for South Tees agreed. In-house Foster Carer and Adopter cohorts at required levels. Return to Middlesbrough strategy in place. Residential Care strategy developed.

2017/18   

Majority of LAC will be in in-house fostering and residential care arrangements. Multi-agency Safeguarding Hub for South Tees agreed. Teeswide Adoption Service in place.

2018/19 

Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

2019/20 

Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

42

6

Adult Social Care

Current Service Portfolio: 

Prevention, Access and Provider Services, comprising Community Services, Intermediate Care, Staying Put service, hospital team, access team, service development, Levick Court and Gleneagles.



Specialist and Lifelong Services, comprising mental health, transitions, children with disabilities, intervention and review teams.

Contribution to a Fairer, Safer, Stronger Middlesbrough: The Social Care Outcome Area works with all stakeholders to ensure that adults and families in need are provided with information, advice and appropriate support to ensure that their, and as such will make a significant contribution to the Fairer and Safer themes of the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough. Progress to date: The Outcome Area has been in place since 2013/14. The focus to date has been: 

successful implementation of all elements of the Care Act 2014;



working with the Public Health Outcome Area and partners in the health sector to develop an effective approach to adult prevention and early intervention, including reablement, to impact on acute services;

Plans for 2016-20: Within the context and parameters of the NHS Five Year Forward View process, priorities within the 2016-20 period are as follows:  



working with partners to develop and deliver Better Care Fund plans for the South Tees to reduce emergency admissions; and





delivering excellent social care services for those with immediate and ongoing need, focusing on increasing the use of supported extra-care housing and the use of assistive technology to reduce residential placements.



developing and implementing with partners an Integrated Care Organisation for the South Tees area; developing and delivering annual Better Care Fund plans to reduce emergency admissions; continuing work with partners to embed an effective approach to adult prevention and early intervention; and implementing a plan to ensure that Middlesbrough achieves Dementiafriendly community status.

Progress to 2015/16 has been positive. The 2015/16 Better Care Fund Plan was

successful in reducing emergency admissions to hospital by 6.3% in the 2015 calendar year, against a target of 3.5%. In pursuit of independent living, 443 reablement packages were put in place in-year, against a target of 120, an increase of 320 from 2014/15. 71% of these achieved identified goals, in line with target. All clients are in receipt of Self-Directed Support, and the great majority of clients who use services who say that those services have made them feel safe and secure. Nevertheless, there is much more to do to fully integrate health and social care services to further improve outcomes, will minimising cost to the taxpayer.

43

Milestones Outcome Area overall

2016/17     

South Tees Health and Social Care Integration Plan to 2020 developed. Integrated PMO to deliver Integration Programme implemented. Deliver 2016/17 Better Care Fund plan for Middlesbrough. Work on Single Point of Access for the South Tees commences. Resource Allocation System reviewed and changes implemented.

2017/18    

South Tees Health and Social Care Integration Plan to 2020 operational. Deliver 2017/18 Better Care Fund plan for Middlesbrough. Single Point of Access fully operational. Ethos of reablement embedded department wide.

2018/19 

 

Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented. South Tees Health and Social Care Integration Plan to 2020 operational. Deliver 2018/19 Better Care Fund plan for Middlesbrough.

2019/20 

 

Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented. South Tees Health and Social Care Integration Plan completed. 2019/20 Better Care Fund plan for Middlesbrough delivered.

44

7

Environment, Property and Commercial Services

Current Service Portfolio: 

Asset Management service, comprising the estates strategy and the strategic and commercial property management.



Environment Services, comprising area care and waste, kerbside recycling, dog wardens, pest control, waste services, parks and allotments, highways inspection and maintenance, winter maintenance and fleet management.



Property and Commercial Services, comprising repairs and maintenance, building cleaning and caretaking, building maintenance, bus station, school catering, bereavement services, TCES and security / CCTV.

Contribution to a Fairer, Safer, Stronger Middlesbrough: The Environment, Property and Commercial Services Outcome Area works with all stakeholders to ensure high-quality and well-maintained open spaces, roads, footways, public buildings and office spaces. As such the Outcome Area will underpin all themes of the 2025 Vision. The Outcome Area also provides a range of support services that will generate significant income for the Council from asset disposals, commercial negotiations and managed services. Progress to date: The Outcome Area has been in place since 2013/14. The focus to date has been:

Plans for 2016-20: Priorities within the 2016-20 period are as follows:



continuing to deliver high-quality and well-maintained open spaces, roads, footways, public buildings and office spaces;





identifying the preferred delivery model for Environment, Property and Commercial Services;





identifying and successfully implementing the preferred delivery model for Leisure Services; and





developing and implementing a revised Estates Strategy for Middlesbrough.

embedding a revised asset disposal process to ensure that Value for Money from property disposals can be properly demonstrated;



disposing assets in line with the Council’s Investment Strategy to ensure that targeted contribution to the Council’s budget gap is achieved; and



improving the commerciality of traded services to ensure that targeted contribution to the Council’s budget gap is achieved.

Progress to 2015/16 has been positive. Middlesbrough remains clean, and the service received positive feedback from the recent Corporate Peer Review. The Middlesbrough Sports Village (total cost £21.6m) was completed in 2015/16, and the Council established a Leisure Trust for the management of the Sports Village and other key leisure assets with Sport & Leisure Management (SLM) Ltd, enabling further investment in the portfolio over the next 15 years and saving the Council around £1.2m in annual running costs. Following a detailed assessment using the Council’s Alternative Delivery Model process, continuation of in-house provision was determined as the preferred model of delivery for Environmental Services.

reviewing and modernising EPCS services following the decision to continue inhouse provision, delivering support services that meet the needs of

customers; monitoring the contract with SLM to ensure continued effective delivery of sport and leisure outcomes for the town;

45

Milestones All services Asset Management

2016/17

Property and Commercial Services

2018/19

Full service restructure commenced.



Full service restructure completed.



Revised asset disposal process and associated governance in place to ensure VFM. Corporate agile working programme developed and implemented.



Reduction in operational property portfolio, maximised income from commercial and investment portfolios.



Ongoing redesign of services to align with outcome delivery.



Services redesigned and aligned with outcome delivery, key measures in place to ensure success.





Environment Services

2017/18







Ongoing redesign of services to align with outcome delivery.



Services redesigned and aligned with outcome delivery, key measures in place to ensure success.





 

2019/20

Maximised income from commercial and investment portfolios. Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Maximised commercial opportunities for income growth and efficiency. Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Maximised commercial opportunities for income growth and efficiency. Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.









Maximised income from commercial and investment portfolios. Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented. Maximised commercial opportunities for income growth and efficiency. Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented. Maximised commercial opportunities for income growth and efficiency. Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.

46

8

Finance, Governance and Support

Current Service Portfolio:  

Finance and Investment services, including Finance and Accountancy, Commissioning and Procurement, Loans and Investments and Revenues and Benefits. Organisation and Governance services, including Democratic Services, Legal Services, Human Resources, ICT, Performance and Partnerships and the Change Programme.

Contribution to a Fairer, Safer, Stronger Middlesbrough: The Finance, Governance and Support Outcome Area works with all stakeholders to ensure that the Council’s financial planning and corporate governance is robust and provides advice, guidance and a range of corporate services to other Outcome Areas. The Outcome Area also provides a number of key direct services to residents, businesses, employees and visitors including customer services, revenues and benefits and electoral registration. As such, the Outcome Areas underpins all themes of the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough. Progress to date: The Outcome Area was established in 2016, bringing together the former Finance and Investment and Organisation and Governance Outcome Areas to improve corporate governance. The focus of these areas since 2013/14 has been:



consolidating support services to achieve 50% saving in baseline budgets;



reviewing support services in line with the Middlesbrough Manger / Employee frameworks, promoting empowerment and self-serve;



developing and leading on a Customer Strategy for the Council, including the development of digital services; and



developing and implementing a revised ICT Strategy to enable channel shift and the optimisation of processes.

Progress to 2015/16 has been variable. The Council has revised its long-term contractual for support services with Mouchel (now Kier), returning a number of services and making significant savings from support services. Most internal services have now been consolidated, but more work is required to ensure that support services provide a coherent and modernised service offer to customers. The former division of the service across two Outcome Areas resulted in several governance issues that are now being addressed by the Council.

Plans for 2016-20: Priorities within the 2016-20 period are as follows: 

developing and managing a Four-Year Strategic Plan for the Council, incorporating its MTFP and Investment Strategy;



developing and leading on the implementation of the Council Improvement Plan to improve corporate governance across the organisation;



restructuring the FGS Outcome Area to ensure services are fully joined-up in support of corporate governance improvements;



embedding the Council’s Customer Strategy within operations to ensure a step-change in customer focus and enhanced service provision; and



delivering support services that meet the needs of customers, auditors and inspectors.

47

Milestones Outcome Area overall

2016/17   

Former Finance and Investment area

  

Former Organisation and Governance area

           

2017/18

All first phase Service Reviews completed. Revised senior management structure for FGS developed. Second phase Service Reviews commenced.



Medium-Term Financial Plan to 2020 established. Internal Audit reviewed and new arrangements agreed. Plan to develop co-commissioning and co-production developed. Establish 2025 Vision Board. Middlesbrough Community Bank established. Robust and effective corporate Programme and Project Management Framework implemented. Risk Management Improvement Plan implemented. Integrated performance clinics / reporting established. Middlesbrough Manager toolkits and associated skills training delivered. TOM embedding plan developed and implemented. Revised ICT Strategy developed and implemented and preferred delivery model for future ICT service identified. Plan to improve robustness and transparency of decision-making implemented. Strategic HR service to support organisational development developed. Revised corporate consultation policy developed and implemented. New HR / Payroll system operational.

2018/19

2019/20

Revised senior management structure for FGS established. Second phase Service Reviews conclude, establishing new department.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Benefits service reconfigured to meet Universal Credit implications.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



Future investment, growth and efficiency opportunities identified in Phase 3 of the Council’s Change Programme implemented.



48

Annex 3: Summary Strategic Risk Register The Council’s Corporate Strategic Risk Register identifies the following as current high and medium level risks to the achievement of the Council’s targeted outcomes, given the current controls in place to reduce their probability and impact of their occurrence. Activity to further mitigate risk to the lowest practicable level is set out in this Strategic Plan and supporting risk plans. Risk levels and controls are reviewed on a quarterly basis in line with the Council’s Risk Management Strategy. Outcome Area(s) affected

Probability

Impact

Score1

Further public sector austerity as a result of the UK exiting the European Union.

8

3

7

21

Qualifications and skills profile of local labour does not match requirements of current employers and / or potential future investors.

2

4

5

20

Targeted investment within Middlesbrough disproportionately affected by low economic growth (e.g. following Brexit).

1

3

5

15

Individuals and families in need not provided with effective help at appropriately early stage, resulting in social issues and greater downstream costs to public services.

2

3

5

15

Potential for achieving sustainable improvement in local health and wellbeing affected by failure to protect and improve public health.

3

3

5

15

Qualifications and skills profile of school leavers does not allow them to progress to further education, employment or training.

4

3

5

15

Increased risk of harm to children and young people, in particular due to instability caused by Social Care transformation.

5

3

5

15

Reduced outcomes and incurred costs through failure to implement effective strategic and delivery partnerships.

8

3

5

15

Failure to deliver required transformation of services, culture change or savings.

All

3

5

15

Failure to respond effectively and efficiently to legislative changes places the Council in breach of statutory duties.

All

2

7

14

Financial pressures resulting from the implementation of proposals within the Education Bill.

4

4

3

12

Legal compliance, organisational effectiveness and / or achievement of objectives impacted by failure to operate effective corporate governance framework and associated processes.

8

3

3

9

Reputational damage as a result of a failure to deliver the Council’s contribution to the Mayor’s Vision for Middlesbrough.

All

3

3

9

Risk

Current risk level

1 Probability is scored from 1 (rare) to 5 (almost certain), impact from 1 (insignificant) to 7 (extreme). Impact can relate to a range of factors including the achievement of priorities, financial losses and reputational damage. The risk score is P x I, with a maximum score of 35.

49

Appendix 2: Level 1: Initial screening assessment – Strategic Plan 2016-20 Subject of assessment:

Strategic Plan 2016-20

Coverage:

Overarching / crosscutting

This is a decision relating to:

Strategy

Policy

Service

Function

Process/procedure

Programme

Project

Review

Organisational change

Other (please state)

It is a:

New approach:

Revision of an existing approach:

It is driven by:

Legislation:

Local or corporate requirements:

Key aims, objectives and activities This document sets out the Council’s approach to maximising its contribution to the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough during a period of financial contraction from 2016-20. It communicates the Council’s change plans to all stakeholders, and provides the basis of the Council’s corporate performance management framework. Statutory drivers Local Government Act 1999 – the programme represents a key element of the Council’s approach to the delivery of Best Value. Equality Act 2010 – the performance management framework underpinning the programme incorporates the Council’s agreed Equality Objectives. Description:

Differences from any previous approach The plan is the annual update of the three-year forward plan agreed by Council in November 2015, extending this now to a fouryear plan. It is consistent with the target operating model and design principles for the Council and its services agreed by Council in past Change Programme and Strategic Plan documents. Key stakeholders and intended beneficiaries Elected Members and Council employees, local communities and businesses, partners. Intended outcomes To maximise the Council’s contribution to the 2025 Vision while addressing financial pressures from Central Government budget austerity, a growing demand for services and increasing costs.

50

Live date:

As soon as the report is approved.

Lifespan:

Financial years 2016/17 to 2019/20.

Date of next review:

The Plan will be monitored on a quarterly basis and reviewed annually. Response

Screening questions

Evidence No

Yes

Uncertain

Human Rights Could the decision impact negatively on individual Human Rights as enshrined in UK legislation?

No. No proposed activity set out within the Strategic Plan will contravene Human Rights as identified in national legislation.

Equality Could the decision result in adverse differential impacts on groups or individuals with characteristics protected in UK equality law? Could the decision impact differently on other commonly disadvantaged groups?

No. The Plan supports the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough, which incorporates the Council’s equality objectives for the period 2016-20, and ensures that due regard is given to the need to promote equality in relation to access, provision, uptake and outcomes. Outcome Delivery Plans are in place for each of the Council’s eight Outcome Areas, setting out steps that will be taken over the next four years to contribute towards the achievement of each outcome. Progress is tracked through the Council’s performance management framework. As a result, there are no concerns that the Strategic Plan could have a disproportionate adverse impact on groups or individuals with characteristics protected in national legislation.

Community cohesion Could the decision impact negatively on relationships between different groups, communities of interest or neighbourhoods within the town?

No. The Plan supports the 2025 Vision for Middlesbrough, which includes commitments to improve community cohesion. Specific actions to improve cohesion are set out within the Outcome Delivery Plan for Outcome 2, Supporting Communities. As a result, there are no concerns that the proposed plan could have an adverse impact on community cohesion.

Vision for Middlesbrough Could the decision impact negatively on the achievement of the Vision for Middlesbrough? Does the decision impact on statutory duties associated with these key objectives?

No. The Strategic Plan positively supports the achievement of the Vision by clearly articulating the Council’s contribution and a process allocating specific responsibility for the delivery of this contribution within the Council. The Plan will enable the Council to continue to fulfil all statutory requirements.

51

Response Screening questions

Evidence No

Yes

Uncertain

Organisational management / transformation Could the decision impact negatively on organisational management or the transformation of the Council’s services as set out in its transformation programme?

No. The document articulates the Council’s transformation programme and fully complies with design principles for change previously agreed by the Council.

Assessment completed by:

Paul Stephens, Head of Performance and Partnerships

LMT approver:

Tony Parkinson, Executive Director of Commercial and Corporate Services

Date:

10 June 2016

Date:

10 June 2016

52

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middlesbrough council council 13 july 2016 strategic plan 2016-2020

MIDDLESBROUGH COUNCIL COUNCIL 13 JULY 2016 STRATEGIC PLAN 2016-2020 CHIEF EXECUTIVE PURPOSE OF THE REPORT 1. This report:   updates the Council’s ...

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