2016 - 2017 - Reynolds Community College

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT CONGRATULATIONS! You have made one of the most important decisions of your life by deciding to attend college and invest in yourself. Your education will prepare you for unexpected opportunities that come your way. I am thrilled you have chosen Reynolds Community College as part of your educational journey. Let me tell you why. You have the distinct benefit of learning from our outstanding faculty who teach from a real-world view. These faculty members are an amazing resource for you. Many are heavily involved in national professional associations and local career networks for their particular subject or industry, and still work in the field. Ask them questions. Take their advice. They are your number-one cheerleaders and want to help you succeed at Reynolds and beyond the classroom. When you are in class, look to your right and to your left. You will be sitting beside students from all backgrounds, and of all ages. Community college campuses offer a rich diversity. Your peers represent a wonderful variety of people to learn alongside. Some are right out of high school, many are mid-career, and others are seasoned, professional business owners; you have a tremendous amount of talent and experience to benefit from in class every day. I encourage you to talk with these peers. Motivate and encourage one another. Network with each other and use these connections to further your career interests.   You have chosen to join Reynolds at an exciting time. Community colleges are frequently highlighted by our nation’s president, Virginia’s governor, and local businesses as a crucial pathway to the workforce, preparing students like you for college graduation and a great job. My commitment to you is to make sure you are ready for that next step, whatever this means for you. Your experience here will give you the tools to pursue your dream job, provide the credits needed to transfer to a four-year university, or advance in your present workplace. Welcome to Reynolds…where outstanding lives get started!   The best...

Gary L. Rhodes, Ed.D. College President

College Catalog 2016-2017

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TABLE OF CONTENTS GENERAL INFORMATION........................ 7 Reynolds History...................................................... 7 Mission, Vision & Values........................................... 7 Accreditation........................................................... 7 Nondiscrimination Policy and Contact Information.............................................................. 8 Annual Public Notice................................................8 Academic Calendar ................................................. 8 Telephone Directory................................................ 14 Campus Location.................................................... 16

ADMISSION & ENROLLMENT................. 19 Admission Requirements......................................... 19 Placement Testing/Test Waiver................................19 Placement Test Waivers......................................... 20 International Student Admissions........................... 20 Student Identification..............................................21

FINANCIAL AID......................................23 Domicile Determination for In-State Tuition Eligibility................................................................ 23 Financial Aid ......................................................... 23 Eligibility Criteria.................................................... 23 General Eligibility Criteria....................................... 23 Application Process................................................ 23 Deadlines............................................................... 24 Loan Applications.................................................. 24 Federal and State Financial Aid Programs Chart...... 24 Disbursement......................................................... 26 Students Attending Two Colleges at the Same Time...................................................................... 26 Impact of Drops/ Withdrawals from Courses........... 26 Satisfactory Academic Progress.............................. 26 Veterans Benefits................................................... 27 State Educational Assistance Programs................... 27 Scholarships........................................................... 27

ADVISING...............................................30 Academic Advising................................................ 30 Reynolds Advising Days......................................... 30 Transfer Advising................................................... 30

STUDENT RESOURCES.......................... 32 Academic Support Centers (Tutoring)..................... 32 Campus Stores....................................................... 32 Career, Employment and Transfer Centers............... 32 Center for the Deaf................................................ 32 College Success Skills Classes................................. 33 Computer Labs...................................................... 33 Counseling............................................................. 33 Enrollment Services................................................ 33 Libraries................................................................. 33 New Student Orientation........................................ 33 Program for Adults in Vocational Education (PAVE)................................................................... 34 Resources for Students in Academic Difficulty......... 34 Services for Students with Disabilities..................... 34 Student Life........................................................... 35

SPECIALTY PROGRAMS.........................37 Center for Distance Learning.................................. 37 Fully Online Degree and Certificate Programs.......... 37 Teacher Preparation .............................................. 38 Teacher Licensure Requirements for the Community College Student..................................................... 38 Virginia Teaching Scholarship Loan Program........... 38 Professional Development for School Personnel...... 38 EducateVA Career Switcher Program...................... 38 Community College Workforce Alliance.................. 39

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Reynolds Advance College Academy ..................... 39 High School Dual Enrollment.................................. 40 Weekend College................................................... 40 Middle College....................................................... 40 Great Expectations................................................ 40 English as a Second Language............................... 40 Learning Communities........................................... 40 Reynolds Honors Program..................................... 40

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES................41 Enrollment Policies & Procedures Classification of Students....................................... 43 Registration Information......................................... 43 Registration Periods............................................... 43 Self-Registration.................................................... 43 Academic Course Load.......................................... 43 Prerequisites and Course Sequencing..................... 43 Repeating a Course................................................43 Withdrawal from Courses....................................... 43 Auditing a Course.................................................. 44 Military Students During National Emergency..........44 Non-Native Speakers of English (English Proficiency)........................................................... 44 Classroom & Instructional Policies & Procedures Grading — Developmental Studies.......................... 46 Grade Point Average.............................................. 46 Repeated Grade..................................................... 46 Final Grades.......................................................... 46 Academic Renewal.................................................46 Academic Standing................................................ 46 Reinstatement from Suspension or Dismissal........... 47 Advanced Standing and Transfer Credit from other Colleges................................................................. 47 Transfer Credit from International Institutions.......... 48 Credit by Assessment by Local Exam (ABLE).......... 48 Prior Learning Activity for Credit Evaluation ........... 48 Military Credit ....................................................... 48 Credit for Occupational Experience ....................... 48 Credit by Advanced Placement ..............................48 Graduation and Program Requirements...................52 Change of Curriculum (Program/Plan).................... 53 Waiver and Substitution of Course Requirements.... 53 Student Records.................................................... 53 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.............. 53 Notice Regarding Directory Information.................. 54 Student Policies & Procedures Student Rights and Responsibilities........................ 56 Student Complaint................................................. 56 Student Grievance..................................................56 Academic Renewal................................................. 56 Student Conduct.................................................... 56 Academic Honesty................................................. 56 Student Sexual Misconduct..................................... 57 Substance Abuse .................................................. 57 Student Assessment............................................... 57 Reynolds Community College, Virginia Community College System, Information Technology Student/ Patron Acceptable Use Agreement......................... 57

PROGRAM INFORMATION.................... 60 College Transfer Programs..................................... 60 University Parallel Study........................................ 60 State Policy on Transfer from Community Colleges to Senior Institutions.................................................. 60 Transfer Agreements.............................................. 60 Occupational and Technical Programs..................... 61 Career Studies Programs.........................................61 Computer Competency Requirement for Students .............................................................................. 61 Academic Program Directory A-Z........................... 62

CURRICULUM PLANNING......................69 General Information Pertaining to Curricular Offerings............................................................... 69 General Education Definition.................................. 69 General Education Goals and Objectives/ Outcomes.............................................................. 69 General Education Electives.................................... 71 Foreign Language Electives.................................... 73

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS......................... 75 Transfer Associate Degrees & Certificates Business Administration......................................... 77 Engineering............................................................78 General Education................................................. 80 Liberal Arts ........................................................... 81 Science.................................................................. 84 Social Sciences ..................................................... 87 Associate Degrees & Certificates Accounting............................................................ 94 Accounting............................................................ 94 Administration of Justice........................................ 95 American Sign Language-English Interpretation...... 96 Architectural and Engineering Technology.............. 98 Automotive Technology........................................ 100 Automotive Technology......................................... 101 Culinary Arts........................................................ 102 Dental Assisting.................................................... 105 Dental Laboratory Technology...............................107 Diesel Mechanics Technology................................ 108 Early Childhood Development............................... 109 Early Childhood Development................................ 110 Emergency Medical Services - Paramedic................ 111 Fire Science Technology.........................................113 Fire Science Technology.........................................115 Horticulture Technology......................................... 115 Hospitality Management........................................ 117 Human Services..................................................... 118 Information Systems Technology........................... 120 Management......................................................... 122 Medical Laboratory Technology............................. 123 Nursing................................................................. 126 Nursing - LPN to Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing............................................................. 130 Opticianry............................................................. 135 Paralegal Studies.................................................. 137 Practical Nursing ..................................................138 Respiratory Therapy...............................................141 Career Studies Certificates Accounting........................................................... 147 Advanced Medical Coder (Health Information Management)....................................................... 147 American Sign Language-English Interpretation..... 148 Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair............. 148 Computer-Aided Design Specialist........................ 149 Criminal Justice.................................................... 149 Dental Laboratory Technology.............................. 150 Early Childhood Education.................................... 150 Early Childhood Education – Advanced.................. 151 Early Childhood School-Age Child Care.................. 151 Ecommerce........................................................... 152 Emergency Medical Services - Emergency Medical Technician............................................................. 152 Emergency Medical Services - Intermediate........... 153 Emergency Medical Services - Paramedic...............154 Entrepreneurship in Small Business........................ 155 Floral Design........................................................ 156 Geospatial Technologies........................................ 156 Health Care Technician (CNA/PCA) ....................... 157 Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Technology..................158 Information Systems Technology - Computer Programmer..........................................................159

College Catalog 2016-2017

TABLE OF CONTENTS Information Systems Technology - Cyber Security................................................................ 159 Information Systems Technology - Internet Application Development (Web Design)................ 160 Information Systems Technology - Microcomputer Applications......................................................... 160 Information Systems Technology - Network Administration...................................................... 160 Information Systems Technology - Network Engineering........................................................... 161 Legal Office Technology.........................................161 Medical Records Coder (Health Information Management)........................................................162 Opticians Apprentice.............................................163 Pastry Arts........................................................... 163 Pharmacy Technician............................................ 164 Pre-Dental Assisting.............................................. 165 Pre-Medical Laboratory Technology....................... 165 Pre-Nursing.......................................................... 166 Pre-Practical Nursing.............................................167 Pre-Respiratory Therapy........................................ 167 Real Estate Agent/Broker...................................... 168 Release of Health Information Specialist (Health Information Management)..................................... 168 Substance Abuse Counseling Education.................169 Sustainable Agriculture......................................... 170 Welding................................................................ 170

EXPLANATORY NOTES........................ 174 Explanatory Notes................................................ 174

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS...................... 176 COLLEGE ORGANIZATION................... 231 Virginia Community College System...................... 231 State Board for Community Colleges..................... 231 Reynolds Community College College Board.......... 231 College Administration.......................................... 231 Reynolds Community College................................ 231 Community College Workforce Alliance Vice President and Staff...............................................................231 Faculty................................................................. 232 Faculty Emeritus.................................................. 238 Senior Adjunct Faculty......................................... 238 Classified Staff..................................................... 243 Advisory Committees........................................... 249

INDEX................................................... 257

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

GENERAL INFORMATION Reynolds History Mission, Vision & Values Accreditation Nondiscrimination Policy and Contact Information Annual Public Notice Academic Calendar Telephone Directory Campus Location

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GENERAL INFORMATION   Responding to the recommendation of a legislative study committee that “every citizen of the Commonwealth be given an opportunity to attend an institution of higher learning offering academic, occupational/ technical, and community service programs at a nominal cost,” in 1966 the General Assembly of Virginia established a statewide system of community colleges. A newly established State Board for Community Colleges prepared a master plan for a system of 23 institutions. The Lieutenant Governor, J. Sargeant Reynolds, heralded the creation of the community college system by the General Assembly as “one of its finest acts and finest hours in this century.” Reynolds Community College, the last of these colleges, is named in honor of the late Lieutenant Governor of the State, who championed legislation creating the state-supported community colleges. Opened in 1972 in temporary headquarters, the college is now a three-campus (Parham Road, Downtown, Goochland) institution and the third largest in the Virginia Community College System, serving the City of Richmond and the counties of Goochland, Hanover, Henrico, Powhatan, and Louisa. From its inception, the college has recognized its strategic role in the metropolitan Richmond area’s economic development. In 1977 the college established its nationally recognized Center for Office Development, a statewide pilot project with the Virginia Community College System and State of Virginia, to provide training in office and supervisory skills for employees of the Commonwealth. Within several years the Center opened this training opportunity to all individuals and businesses. By Spring 1989, the college offered short-term training and seminars at three strategic locations in the metropolitan Richmond area. Demand for these services from the business community continued to escalate. As a result, the college reorganized its outreach efforts in 1994 by creating the Institute for Economic Development & Extended Studies. In response to the evolving needs of the business community, the unit reorganized in the fall of 2000, changing its name to the Institute for Workforce Development. The Institute was comprised of six Centers including the Center for Corporate Training, the Center for Organizational Effectiveness, the Center for Lifelong Learning, the Center for Apprenticeship Programs, the Center for Entrepreneurial Development, and the Center for Professional Development and Renewal. Reynolds Community College and John Tyler Community College collaborated in 2003 to create a new workforce development

College Catalog 2016-2017

entity that provides business, industry and government in the region with a single source for workforce development. The new organization is named the Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA). The alliance is a cooperative partnership dedicated to supporting economic development and providing world-class workforce training and services to both the public and private sectors. The vision behind the new organization is to maximize the talents and resources of both institutions’ current workforce development centers in an effort to provide Richmond, Tri-cities and surrounding counties with a world-class regional workforce development organization. The college currently offers two-year college transfer and occupational-technical degrees, one-year occupational-technical certificates, and career studies certificates requiring less than one year of full-time study. Having enrolled more than 335,000 persons in credit courses since its opening, Reynolds Community College continues to strive to meet the aspirations of its namesake to provide “a practical and economic answer to the future educational needs of thousands of Virginians.”

Mission J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College (Reynolds) provides an accessible, quality education that develops students for success in the workplace, prepares students for successful transfer to colleges and universities, builds a skilled workforce that contributes to regional economic development, and promotes personal enrichment and lifelong learning.  

Vision Reynolds will be the preeminent pathway to the workforce and degree attainment for the greater Richmond region. 

We Value Our Students We promote high academic standards and innovative programs that enable our students to go further and faster in pursuit of their goals. Our People We promote a culture of collaboration, hire talented individuals, and invest in their professional and personal growth. Our Community We enrich our community through education, leadership, partnerships, and volunteerism. Our Environment We create and foster safe, healthy, and inclusive places for learning, teaching, and working. 

Accreditation Statement J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges Commission on Colleges to award associate degrees and certificates. Contact the

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College.  

Nondiscrimination Policy and Contact Information Nondiscrimination Policy J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College is an equal opportunity institution providing educational and employment opportunities, programs, services, and activities.  Reynolds does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, disability, family medical history or genetic information, military service or veteran status, national origin, parental status, political affiliation, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy and gender identity), sexual orientation, or any other non-merit based factor.  The college also prohibits sexual misconduct, including sexual violence or harassment.    Contact Information Students or prospective students who believe they have witnessed or experienced discriminatory conditions or discriminatory acts inclusive of sexual misconduct, sexual violence, sexual harassment, or inaccessible conditions should present their concerns to either of the following: Vice President of Student Affairs  College Title IX Coordinator and ADA/Section 504 Compliance Officer J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College P.O. Box 85622 Richmond, VA 23285-5622 Telephone:  (804) 523-5296 Fax:  (804) 523-5714 Email:  [email protected] Physical Location:  Parham Road Campus, Georgiadis Hall, Room 350 (future location Room 204)

Annual Public Notice Reynolds Community College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or age in its programs or activities. Reynolds offers programs in many vocational areas under its open admissions policy. Specifically, Reynolds offers admissions based on selective criteria in Medical Laboratory Technology, Nursing AAS, Practical Nursing Certificate, Respiratory Therapy, and PAVE career studies certificates in Child Care Assistant, Clerical Assistant, Food Service Assistant, and Health Care Assistant through a separate applications process that is nondiscriminatory. For more information about the application process, contact the admissions office known as Enrollment Services at (804) 523-6464. Inquiries related to Reynolds nondiscrimination policies should be directed to: Vice President of Student Affairs  College Title IX Coordinator and ADA/Section 504  Compliance Officer J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College P.O. Box 85622  Richmond, VA 23285-5622  Telephone: (804) 523-5296  Fax: (804) 523-5714  Email: [email protected]  Physical Location: Parham Road Campus, Georgiadis Hall, Room 350 (future location Room 204) Programs reviewed and updated August 2015

Or Department of Education Office of Civil Rights 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20202-1100 www.ed.gov  Employees or prospective employees who believe they have witnessed or experienced discriminatory conditions or discriminatory acts inclusive of sexual misconduct, sexual violence, sexual harassment or inaccessible conditions should present their concerns to: College Equal Employment Opportunity Officer J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College P.O. Box 85622 Richmond, VA  23285-5622 Telephone:  (804) 523-5877 Fax:  (804) 523-5108 Email:  [email protected]  Physical Location:  Parham Road Campus, Workforce Development and Conference Center, Suite 121

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College Catalog 2016-2017

GENERAL INFORMATION Academic Calendar 2016 - 2017  

2016 Fall Semester Important Dates March 28–April 8, 2016

Academic Advising

April 11–June 12, 2016

Priority Registration

April 15, 2016

Deadline for 2016 Online Scholarship Applications

April 15, 2016

Recommended Financial Aid Application Submission Date for Fall

June 1, 2016

Deadline for Fall Applications for F-1 Visa Students

June 13–August 21, 2016

Open Registration

July 29, 2016

First Tuition Payment Deadline (tuition payment due by Friday of the week you register)

August 1, 2016

Deadline for Fall Domicile Appeals

August 18, 2016

Adjunct Faculty Convocation

September 5, 2016

Labor Day (college closed)

September 27, 2016

College-wide Convocation Day (no classes/no services)

September 30, 2016

Deadline for Fall Graduation Applications

September 30, 2016

Deadline for Spring Applications for F-1 Visa Students

November 23, 2016

Faculty Research Day (no classes/college closes at noon)

November 24-27, 2016

Fall Break (college closed)

December 20, 2016

Grades Due

Regular Session (16 Weeks) August 22, 2016

Classes Begin

August 22-26, 2016

Late Registration and Add/Drop

August 26, 2016

Last Day to Add Class

September 7, 2016

Last Day to Drop with Refund

October 28, 2016

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of “W”

December 10, 2016

Classes End

December 12-17, 2016

Examination Period

Twelve-Week Session September 20, 2016

Classes Begin

September 20-23, 2016

Late Registration and Add/Drop

September 23, 2016

Last Day to Add Class

October 3, 2016

Last Day to Drop with Refund

November 9, 2016

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of “W”

December 17, 2016

Classes End

First Eight-Week Session August 22, 2016

Classes Begin

August 22-24, 2016

Late Registration and Add/Drop

August 24, 2016

Last Day to Add Class

August 29, 2016

Last Day to Drop with Refund

September 23, 2016

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

October 18, 2016

Classes End

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Second Eight-Week Session October 19, 2016

Classes Begin

October 19-21, 2016

Late Registration and Add/Drop

October 21, 2016

Last Day to Add Class

October 26, 2016

Last Day to Drop with Refund

November 21, 2016

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

December 17, 2016

Classes End

First Four-Week Session August 22, 2016

Classes Begin

August 22, 2016

Late Registration and Add/Drop

August 22, 2016

Last Day to Add Class

August 24, 2016

Last Day to Drop with Refund

September 7, 2016

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

September 19, 2016

Classes End

Second Four-Week Session September 20, 2016

Classes Begin

September 20, 2016

Late Registration and Add/Drop

September 20, 2016

Last Day to Add Class

September 22, 2016

Last Day to Drop with Refund

October 6, 2016

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

October 18, 2016

Classes End

Third Four-Week Session October 19, 2016

Classes Begin

October 19, 2016

Late Registration and Add/Drop

October 19, 2016

Last Day to Add Class

October 21, 2016

Last Day to Drop with Refund

November 3, 2016

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

November 15, 2016

Classes End

Fourth Four-Week Session November 16, 2016

Classes Begin

November 16, 2016

Late Registration and Add/Drop

November 16, 2016

Last Day to Add Class

November 18, 2016

Last Day to Drop with Refund

December 6, 2016

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

December 17, 2016

Classes End

 

2017 Spring Semester Important Dates September 15, 2016

Recommended Financial Aid Application Submission Date for Spring

September 30, 2016

Deadline for Spring Applications for F-1 Visa Students

October 24–November 4, 2016

Academic Advising

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College Catalog 2016-2017

GENERAL INFORMATION November 7-27, 2016

Priority Registration

November 28, 2016–January 8, 2017

Open Registration (tuition payment due by Friday of the week you register)

December 1, 2016

Deadline for Spring Domicile Appeals

December 2, 2016

Deadline for Priority Registration Tuition Payment

January 3, 2017

First Day to Submit 2017 Online Scholarship Applications

January 5, 2017

Adjunct Faculty Convocation

January 16, 2017

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (college closed)

January 31, 2017

Deadline for Spring Graduation Applications

March 13-19, 2017

Spring Break (no classes)

March 13, 2017

Professional Development Day (no services)

April 17, 2017

Deadline for 2017 Online Scholarship Applications

May 9, 2017

Grades Due

May 10, 2017

Professional Development Day

May 13 or 14, 2017

Graduation, VCU Siegel Center

Regular Session (16 Weeks) January 9, 2017

Classes Begin

January 9-13, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

January 13, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

January 25, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

March 23, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of “W”

May 1, 2017

Classes End

May 2-8, 2017

Examination Period

Twelve-Week Session February 7, 2017

Classes Begin

February 7-10, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

February 10, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

February 17, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

April 4, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

May 8, 2017

Classes End

First Eight-Week Session January 9, 2017

Classes Begin

January 9-11, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

January 11, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

January 17, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

February 10, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

March 6, 2017

Classes End

Second Eight-Week Session March 7, 2017

Classes Begin

March 7-9, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

March 9, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

March 21, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

April 14, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE May 8, 2017

Classes End

First Four-Week Session January 9, 2017

Classes Begin

January 9, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

January 9, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

January 11, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

January 25, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

February 6, 2017

Classes End

Second Four-Week Session February 7, 2017

Classes Begin

February 7, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

February 7, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

February 9, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

February 22, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

March 6, 2017

Classes End

Third Four-Week Session March 7, 2017

Classes Begin

March 7, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

March 7, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

March 9, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

March 29, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

April 10, 2017

Classes End

Fourth Four-Week Session April 11, 2017

Classes Begin

April 11, 2107

Late Registration and Add/Drop

April 11, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

April 13, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

April 26, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

May 8, 2017

Classes End

 

2017 Summer Semester Important Dates February 15, 2017

Recommended Financial Aid Application Submission Date for Summer

March 27–April 7, 2017

Academic Advising

April 3, 2017

Deadline for Summer Domicile Appeals

April 10-23, 2017

Priority Registration

April 17, 2017

Deadline for 2017 Online Scholarship Applications

April 24–May 21, 2017

Open Registration (tuition payment due by Friday of the week you register)

April 28, 2017

Deadline for Priority Registration Tuition Payment

May 29, 2017

Memorial Day (college closed)

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College Catalog 2016-2017

GENERAL INFORMATION June 1, 2017

Deadline for Fall Applications for F-1 Visa Students

June 30, 2017

Deadline for Summer Graduation Applications

July 4, 2017

Independence Day (college closed)

August 9, 2017

Grades Due

Regular Session (10 Weeks) May 22, 2017

Classes Begin

May 22-25, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop (Tuition payment due daily)

May 25, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

June 1, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

July 3, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of “W”

August 1, 2017

Classes End

Eight-Week Session June 6, 2017

Classes Begin

June 6-8, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

June 8, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

June 13, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

July 10, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

August 1, 2017

Classes End

First Five-Week Session May 22, 2017

Classes Begin

May 22-23, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

May 23, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

May 25, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

June 12, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

June 26, 2017

Classes End

Second Five-Week Session July 5, 2017

Classes Begin

July 5-6, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

July 6, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

July 10, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

July 25, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

August 8, 2017

Classes End

First Four-Week Session May 22, 2017

Classes Begin

May 22, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

May 22, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

May 24, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

June 7, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

June 19, 2017

Classes End

Second Four-Week Session July 5, 2017

Classes Begin

July 5, 2017

Late Registration and Add/Drop

July 5, 2017

Last Day to Add Class

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE July 7, 2017

Last Day to Drop with Refund

July 20, 2017

Last Day to Withdraw from Class with a Grade of "W"

August 1, 2017

Classes End

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College Catalog 2016-2017

GENERAL INFORMATION Telephone Directory Visit reynolds.edu for the most current telephone numbers. Reynolds Information Center (804) 371-3000 Area Code 804 for all phone numbers

Downtown

Parham

Goochland

Academic Schools

 

 

 

Business

523-5177

523-5301

523-5432

Humanities and Social Sciences

523-5178

523-5263

 

Math, Science and Engineering

523-5374

523-5225

 

Nursing and Allied Health

523-5375

 

 

College Resources

 

 

 

Academic Support Center (Tutoring)

523-5687

523-5927

523-5927

Business Office

855-874-6682

855-874-6682

855-874-6682

Campus Store

786-8580

371-3266

 

Career, Employment, and Transfer Center

523-5970

523-5067

523-5067

Community College Workforce Alliance (Non-credit Courses)

 

523-2292

 

Computer Labs

523-5032

523-5377

523-5419

Distance Learning *Toll free for VA only

523-5612 or 1 (800) 711-1628*

 

 

Domicile Officer (in-state tuition appeals)

523-5029

 

 

Dual Enrollment

523-5320

 

 

English as a Second Language (ESL) Program

523-5020

 

 

International Admissions/ Services

523-5029

 

 

Libraries

523-5211

523-5220

523-5419

PAVE Program

523-5572

523-5572

 

Placement Testing/Testing Centers

523-5470

523-5411

523-5421

Department of Police

 

 

 

Emergencies

523-5911

 

 

Non-Emergencies

523-5219

 

 

Student Affairs

 

 

 

Enrollment Services (Admissions, Advising, Registration Assistance, Veteran Affairs)

523-6464

523-6464

523-6464

   

 

 

 

College Catalog 2016-2017

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Financial Aid

855-874-6682

855-874-6682

855-874-6682

Services for Students with Disabilities

523-5628

523-5290

523-5400

Student Life

523-5082

523-5983

523-5400

Telecommunications Devices for the Deaf (TDD)

786-8800

 

 

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College Catalog 2016-2017

GENERAL INFORMATION Campus Locations   Downtown Campus (DTC) 700 East Jackson Street, Richmond The Downtown Campus, located at 700 East Jackson Street near the Richmond Coliseum, provides one- and two-year occupational/technical programs in a number of allied health, business, and community service areas, as well as college transfer programs in liberal arts, business, science, and computer science.

  Goochland Campus (GC) 1851 Dickinson Road, Goochland

 

Located on the same campus as the Goochland Family YMCA near routes 6 and 632, this campus offers a range of programs in horticulture, sustainable agriculture, automotive and diesel mechanics, and welding, as well as general education and transfer courses.

Parham Road Campus (PRC) 1651 East Parham Road, Richmond

 

The Parham Road Campus, located one mile west of I-95 in Henrico County, offers college-transfer programs in liberal arts, education, engineering, science, and computer science, as well as a broad range of occupational/technical programs in the areas of business, engineering, and public service.

  Visit reynolds.edu/locations for virtual interactive campus maps.

College Catalog 2016-2017

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

ADMISSION & ENROLLMENT Admission Requirements Placement Testing/Test Waiver Placement Test Waivers International Student Admissions Student Identification

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College Catalog 2016-2017

ADMISSION & ENROLLMENT  

Admission Requirements Reynolds Community College is an equal opportunity institution providing educational and employment opportunities, programs, services, and activities. Reynolds does not discriminate on the basis of age, color, disability, family medical history or genetic information, military service, national origin, parental status, political affiliation, race, religion, sex (including pregnancy and gender identity), sexual orientation, or any other non-merit based factor. See page 7 for the full nondiscrimination policy and contact information. Consistent with its mission of providing educational access and development in its region, Reynolds admits as either a noncurricular or curricular student, anyone with a recognized high school diploma, a GED, or certificate of completion of home schooling, or who is 18 years of age and has demonstrated college readiness. Non-curricular applicants are persons who plan to enroll in credit courses without earning a degree or certificate at Reynolds. Curricular applicants are persons who plan to enroll in credit courses in order to earn a degree or certificate. An applicant applying as a curricular student must have received a recognized high school diploma or GED. Admission into selected programs, as specified in the Program Information section of this catalog, may require applicants to satisfy additional program–level entrance requirements. New students, students returning from an absence of at least three years, or students that submitted an application and did not attend within one year must complete a Reynolds Application for Admission. Official high school transcripts that include graduation date or official GED exam results are required of applicants who are in the process of completing secondary studies. Applicants to the Nursing or Practical Nursing programs must submit official high school transcripts that document graduation or a GED. For reinstatement from suspension or dismissal refer to the Classroom and Instructional Policies and Procedures section in this catalog. Newly admitted curricular students should complete the Reynolds placement tests and meet with an advising specialist either through the new student orientation program, a group advising session, or individually during walk-in advising hours prior to registering. The specialist will evaluate the student’s career and educational objectives, level of preparation, and developmental needs, and may recommend adjustment of the student’s intended curriculum (academic program plan). Students whose primary language is not English must also complete the Reynolds English Language Proficiency test battery before taking the Virginia Placement Test (VPT) or other placement tests. The Central Admissions and Records Office will evaluate requested advanced standing and transfer credit for curricular students, preferably prior to the student’s first registration at Reynolds (see the Advanced Standing section of Classroom Policies and Procedures in this catalog). Reynolds reserves the right to evaluate special cases and, when considered in the best interest of Reynolds, refuse admission to

College Catalog 2016-2017

applicants. Furthermore, when enrollments must be limited for any curriculum, priority shall be given to all qualified applicants who are residents of the political subdivisions supporting Reynolds and to Virginia residents not having access to a given program at their local community college, provided such students apply for admission to the program prior to registration or by a deadline established by Reynolds. In addition, residents of localities with which Reynolds has a clinical-site or other agreements may receive equal consideration for admission. Applications may be submitted through the Reynolds website (reynolds.edu), in person, by mail, or by fax. Send or mail to: Office of Admissions and Records Reynolds Community College P. O. Box 85622 Richmond, Virginia 23285-5622 Telephone: (804) 523-5029 FAX: (804) 371-3650

Placement Testing/Test Waiver At Reynolds, the goal of the Placement Testing program is to enroll students in courses that maximize their opportunity for success. Placement tests determine what, if any, developmental courses students need to take. Developmental courses prepare students for college-level math and English. Before registering, all students entering as curricular students must take placement tests in English and mathematics as well as the SmarterMeasure assessment. Testing times and resources for test preparation can be found on the Testing Center website at reynolds.edu/ student_services/testing_center or by contacting any campus Testing Center (Downtown Campus, (804) 523-5470; Parham Road Campus, (804) 523-5411; Goochland Campus,  (804) 523-5421). Test scores are valid for two years after the date of the test. In general, students may not take a placement test in the same subject matter more than one time in a four-month period. Students who take the math placement test and who do not enroll in developmental math are allowed to take one retest within 12 months. Students who attempt developmental mathematics will be ineligible for a retest. Exceptions to this retest policy may be made on a case-by-case basis. Non-curricular students registering for English, mathematics, biology, chemistry, and other courses requiring tests as listed in the Reynolds catalog and/or class schedule, must take the appropriate placement tests. Non-curricular students who have accumulated nine or more semester credits in college courses and are experiencing academic difficulty in one or more areas will also be required to take placement tests. (Academic difficulty is defined as having a cumulative GPA of less than 2.0 or receiving an “F” or “U” in a course.) A placement test may be waived on the basis of one or more of the criteria listed below. Students must provide official documentation of college AP scores, SAT, or other scores used to waive the placement tests or provide documentation of college courses taken that would qualify the student for the waiver. Scores must be within two years of the date the student is requesting the waiver.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Placement Test Waiver English Students may be exempt from taking the reading portion of the placement test if they meet one of the following: • Hold a degree from an accredited college • Successfully completed an appropriate developmental reading course at another Virginia community college • AP score of 3 or higher on the English language test • Received a writing placement recommendation above the developmental level from another college • Transient students who submit an appropriately completed Transient Student Form • Have successfully completed a writing course equivalent to ENG 111 or higher • Present an SAT verbal or reading score of 500+ on both critical reading and writing sections of the test • Present an ACT reading score of 21+ on both English and Reading tests The SAT or ACT tests must have been taken within two years prior to the requested test waiver. Mathematics Students may be exempt from taking the mathematics portion of the placement test if they meet one of the following: • Complete an appropriate developmental course at another Virginia community college • Successfully complete a college-level math course at another college equivalent to a college-level math course at Reynolds  • Transient students who submit an appropriately completed Transient Student Form • Present a score of 22 or higher on the mathematics portion of the ACT (and have high school prerequisite courses – see below) • Present a score of 520 or higher on the math portion of the SAT (and have high school prerequisite courses –see below) The SAT/ACT tests must have been taken within two years prior to the requested course waiver. Students who waive the mathematics portion of the placement test may be placed into one of the following courses: • MTH 115 • MTH 151 • MTH 163 • MTH 166 • MTH 170 Students who wish to take a math course higher than those courses listed above must take the mathematics portion of the placement test. High School Students Enrolled at Reynolds High school students may be permitted to enroll in collegelevel courses at Reynolds prior to graduating from high school. Students enrolled in local school systems may enroll as dualenrollment students. Reynolds has dual enrollment agreements with local school systems to offer college-level courses at Reynolds or high school locations. Dual enrollment is initiated through the students’ high school and is approved by the Reynolds dual enrollment coordinator. Other students, including

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home school students, may enroll via concurrent enrollment. High school students approved to take courses at Reynolds may receive both high school and college credit.   High school juniors and seniors may be permitted to enroll in college-level courses as special admission students. As a requirement for special admission, high school students must demonstrate college readiness as determined by Reynolds. Exceptions for enrolling freshman and sophomore students are considered by Reynolds’ President. Requests for exceptions for high school freshman and sophomores are collected through the Central Admissions and Records office. Reynolds must receive written permission from the student’s high school principal for each semester or term the student would like to enroll. The parent of home school students will be recognized as the high school principal. High school students cannot register for developmental, health, or physical education courses. High school students are not eligible to apply for financial aid. Transient Students Students indicating that they are enrolling at Reynolds in order to satisfy program requirements at their home institution (college or university) will be admitted as non-curricular transient students. Such students should submit a completed Reynolds Transient Student Approval Form signed by the student’s home institution advisor for each semester of enrollment at Reynolds. This form ensures transfer of the courses to the home institution program. Based on the certification of readiness by the home institution, Reynolds may waive certain placement tests, as well as not require college transcripts or proof of the completion of certain course prerequisites. College Readiness for Non-High School Graduates Students who are at least 18 years of age seeking admission into one of Reynolds’ curricular programs and who lack a recognized high school diploma or the recognized equivalent (General Equivalency Diploma or Home School Completion Certificate) will be required to meet the college readiness standards administrated by the Reynolds Testing Center. Students who pass meet the college readiness standards may be admitted to Reynolds in either non-curricular or curricular programs, provided they have also satisfied other admission requirements. The college readiness assessment cannot be used to gain admission into the Nursing and Practical Nursing programs; these programs require completion of a high school diploma or GED. Students who do not meet the college readiness standard and wish to enroll will be admitted as non-curricular students only. They will remain non-curricular students until such time as they obtain a high school diploma or GED certificate. Students may be allowed to retake the test for mitigating circumstances or after a minimum of four months.

International Student Admissions Reynolds is authorized under Federal law to enroll non-immigrant students. The deadline for submission of international student applications with accompanying documentation is:

College Catalog 2016-2017

ADMISSION & ENROLLMENT June 1 for the fall semester October 1 for the spring semester Contact the international student advisor for more information and to request an International Student packet for admission. F-1 applicants will be considered for admission to an associate degree program or to the ESL program depending on placement test scores. Admission is not guaranteed and is particularly selective for A.A. and A.S. (university transfer) degree programs. Reynolds does not admit F-1 applicants to any allied health program. Also, applicants will not be considered for admission to the Hospitality Management program or any Reynolds program offered primarily through distance education. Contact the international student advisor in the Central Admissions and Records Office at (804) 523-5029, for the International Student packet which explains the admission process and the eligibility requirements for a student visa.

Student Identification Social Security Number and Date of Birth It is highly recommended that individuals provide their social security number at the time of application (per Section 6050S of the Restructuring and Reform Act of 1998). An individual’s social security number will be used in accordance with federal/ state reporting requirements and/or identification and research purposes within the VCCS. Applicants for financial aid are required to submit their Social Security numbers. Pell Grant program applicants should note that the U. S. Department of Education requires Social Security numbers when processing applications. The Internal Revenue Service also requires valid Social Security numbers. Student Identification Number (EMPL ID) Reynolds assigns a student identification number at the time of application. Students must use this number to access services on campus Reynolds Online or MyReynolds. When requested through the Reynolds application, students new to Reynolds that have attended another VCCS college should supply the EmplId assigned by the other college. Students that have records that exist at Reynolds and another VCCS college should contact the Admissions & Records office, or a campus Enrollment Services for guidance on the student identification number to select.  

College Catalog 2016-2017

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

FINANCIAL AID Domicile Determination for In-State Tuition Eligibility 23 Financial Aid 23 Eligibility Criteria 23 General Eligibility Criteria 23 Application Process 23 Deadlines 24 Loan Applications 24 Federal and State Financial Aid Programs Chart 24 Disbursement 26 Students Attending Two Colleges at the Same Time 26 Impact of Drops/ Withdrawals from Courses 26 Satisfactory Academic Progress 26 Veterans Benefits 27 State Educational Assistance Programs 27 Scholarships 27

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College Catalog 2016-2017

FINANCIAL AID  

To be eligible for most federal and state aid programs, a student must:

Reynolds makes an initial determination of a student’s eligibility for in-state tuition rates (domiciliary status) based on the information the applicant and/or the applicant’s parent, legal guardian, or spouse supplies on the Application for Admission. Applicants certify that they have provided accurate information on behalf of parents, legal guardians, and spouses. The determination is made under the provisions of section  23-7.4 of the Code of Virginia (on file in Central Admissions and Records). Non-U.S. citizens seeking eligibility for in-state tuition rates must provide immigration and other required documents. Occasionally Reynolds may require clarification or additional information from the applicant before making the determination.

• Be a U.S. citizen or an eligible non-citizen; • Be admitted to, and pursuing, an eligible degree or certificate program; • Have a high school diploma, a General Education Development (GED), or a certificate of completion of homeschooling.  • Have a valid Social Security number; • Make satisfactory academic progress; • Certify on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) that federal student aid will be used only for educational purposes; • Certify on the FAFSA that they are not in default on a federal student loan and do not owe money on a federal grant; • Register with the Selective Service if required (males only); and • Be enrolled in credit courses. No financial aid is available for non-credit or audited courses.

Domicile Determination for  In-State Tuition Eligibility

Students requesting to appeal out-of-state status must submit a completed Application for Re-Classification Of Student’s Domicile Status. This form is available at any campus Enrollment Services or the Central Admissions and Records Office. The completed form, with needed supporting documentation, must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the first day of classes of the semester the student is attempting to enroll. The determination will be issued in writing prior to the first official day of classes. Requests for review of domicile and domicile appeals that are received after the first day of classes will be considered for subsequent semesters only. Residency status must be determined prior to the start of the term. Appeals and domicile status changes are not retroactive.

NOTE: To be considered for Virginia state financial aid programs, applicants must qualify for the in-state tuition rate.

General Eligibility Criteria A student’s eligibility for financial aid is determined using the following formula:    Estimated Cost of Attendance – Expected Family Contribution ______________________________ = Demonstrated Financial Need

Financial Aid Financial aid is money provided to students to help pay college expenses, including direct educational expenses such as tuition, fees, books, and supplies, as well as cost of living expenses like food, housing, and transportation. Reynolds processes over 19,000 financial aid applications each year. Each year more than 8,000 degree- and certificate-seeking students receive over $40 million in loans, grants, and work-study. This section contains a brief overview of selected financial aid information and is subject to revision without notice. Current details on aid programs, policies, and procedures are available on the Reynolds website at reynolds.edu/financialaid. Students needing assistance should contact a campus Enrollment Services. The staff within the Enrollment Services can assist students with completing applications, reviewing verification documents and worksheets, obtaining financial aid information, understanding financial aid policies, and will work with students to collect requested documents to ensure timely processing of their financial aid. To receive printed information about financial aid programs and regulations, submit a written request to the Office of Financial Aid at P.O. Box 85622, Richmond, VA 23285-5622.

Eligibility Criteria Program Eligibility Students may be eligible for financial aid assistance in the form of a loan, grant, or work-study award. 

College Catalog 2016-2017

The federal government, using information reported on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), computes the Expected Family Contribution (EFC). The Office of Financial Aid at Reynolds develops a financial aid package that attempts to meet students’ demonstrated financial need. However, because the various funding sources are limited, the amount of financial aid funds awarded may not meet full need. Students should contact Enrollment Services if they believe that there are changes in their financial circumstances, not covered by information provided on the FAFSA that could have an impact on their financial aid eligibility. Students admitted as non-curricular, transient, dual-enrolled or concurrent are ineligible to receive financial aid. Students enrolled in career studies certificate programs that require less than 16 credits to complete are ineligible to receive financial aid. Certain other career studies certificate programs are also ineligible for financial aid. If you have any questions regarding a specific program’s eligibility for financial aid, contact Enrollment Services.

Application Process 1. If new to Reynolds, apply for admission to Reynolds as a degree/certificate candidate. Students must be admitted into an approved curricular program in order to be eligible for financial aid.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 2. Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at the US Department of Education’s free website: fafsa.ed.gov. FAFSA on the web is the best way to apply for aid. Students do not need to receive an admissions decision before applying for financial aid. Students must complete a new or renewal FAFSA that coincides with the new academic year to reapply for financial aid. For more information on the process, please visit our website at: reynolds.edu/financialaid and select “Applying for Financial Aid.” It is important that students list Reynolds (federal code #003759) as an institution that will receive their completed FAFSA information. 3. Renewal applicants may access their renewal FAFSA at fafsa.ed.gov by selecting “Fill out a Renewal FAFSA.” NOTE: Reynolds encourages applicants to apply electronically using FAFSA on the web. The web application will automatically prompt the student to enter all required fields and will question any erroneous data. In addition, the results of a FAFSA completed electronically are received in approximately three to five Business days, whereby a paper FAFSA takes approximately four to six weeks. 4. After completing the 2015 – 2016 FAFSA, applicants will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR) from the US Department of Education. If any corrections are necessary, students should correct the information on the web, or on the signed SAR and mail it back to the Central Processor at the address listed on the SAR. Students are randomly selected by the federal government to verify the financial information that is listed on the FAFSA. Students who are selected for verification will receive a request for additional information from the Reynolds Office of Financial Aid. This information should be returned to Enrollment Services; students will not be awarded financial aid until all requested information has been submitted. 5. Students should promptly respond to any financial aid or admissions inquiries sent by Reynolds. The student should be sure to complete and return other financial aid materials, such as loan applications, if applying for an educational loan. Students must have applied and have ALL requested documents on file, to include Verification materials and SAR corrections, in the Office of Financial Aid on or before the posted deadline for each semester. FAFSAs and incoming documents received on or before the posted deadline will receive priority processing. FAFSAs and incoming documents received after the posted deadline will be processed after the priority applications are completed. (Refer to the Financial Aid Deadlines section.)

To ensure the timely processing of financial aid applications (FAFSA), students should complete and submit the FAFSA to the federal processor by no later than April 15 for the fall semester; September 15 for the spring semester; and February 15 for the summer semester. The chart below lists deadlines for the FAFSA and for other information related to the financial aid application process.   Document

Fall 16 Deadline

Spring 17 Deadline

Summer 17 Deadline

FAFSA

April 15, 2016

Sept 15, 2016

March 15, 2017

Loan Request

July 1, 2016

Oct 15 , 2016

April 1, 2017

Admission and Program Placed

June 15, 2016

Nov 16, 2016

April 15, 2017

Verification and SAR Corrections

June 15, 2016

Nov 16, 2016

April 15, 2017

Other Missing Information

June 15, 2016

Nov 16, 2016

April 15, 2017

Loan Applications Students interested in applying for federal student loans must complete the FAFSA and a separate loan application. Students interested in this type of assistance must submit their loan request form, in addition to having a valid FAFSA reflecting correct data on file, to Enrollment Services by July 1 if applying for a loan for the fall, October 15 for the spring and April 1 for the summer. The last day a loan application may be submitted for processing is October 15 for the fall semester; April 1 for the spring semester; and July 1 for the summer semester. Students must also complete an entrance counseling session and master promissory note at studentloans.gov before their loan can be disbursed. In addition, students must maintain enrollment in at least six semester hours in order to remain eligible for a loan.

6. After a completed FAFSA is received by the federal processor, the results will be sent to the student and to Reynolds. The Office of Financial Aid will use the information from the FAFSA to determine a student’s eligibility, develop an award package and notify the student of the award by email to the VCCS email account. It is anticipated that award notifications will be emailed beginning in July. All financial aid is awarded assuming fulltime enrollment (i.e. 12 or more credit hours) for each of two semesters (fall and spring). If a student enrolls less than full-time, the award amount will be prorated accordingly.

Deadlines 24

College Catalog 2016-2017

FINANCIAL AID   Federal and State Financial Aid Programs Offered at Reynolds   Program

Who is Eligible

Children of Law Enforcement Officers

Children, ages 16 to 25, of May be eligible for full tuition Virginia law enforcement and fees. officers, firefighters, or rescue squad members who have been killed in the line of duty.

Value

Application Procedure Contact the Central Admissions and Records Office.

Commonwealth Award (COMA) Undergraduates, enrolled at least half-time, who prove financial need. Virginia domicile required.

The amount of tuition and fees, or proven need, whichever is less.

Complete the FAFSA.

Federal Pell Grant

Undergraduate students, who prove exceptional financial need.

$300 to $5,775 per year (Subject to yearly change)

Complete the FAFSA.

Federal Direct Stafford Loan Subsidized

Students enrolled at least halftime,who prove financial need.

Up to $3,500 for the 1st year of undergraduate education. Up to$4,500 for each subsequent year of undergraduate education. (Subject to change)

Complete the FAFSA. Obtain a Federal Stafford Loan request from Enrollment Services or Reynolds Financial Aid website.

Federal Direct Stafford Loan Unsubsidized

Students enrolled at least halftime. Financial need is not a factor.

Up to $6,000 for each year of Undergraduate Education. (Subject to change)

Complete the FAFSA. Obtain a Federal Stafford Loan request from Enrollment Services or Reynolds Financial Aid website.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program(FSEOG)

Undergraduate students who prove exceptional financial need, and who qualify for a Federal Pell Grant.

$100 to $4,000 per year. (Subject to change)

Complete the FAFSA.

Federal Work-Study Program(FWS)

Undergraduate students who prove financial need.

Varies with the hourly wage and hours worked. Students awarded FWS are not guaranteed employment.

Complete the FAFSA. Interview and be selected for a job.

Part-Time Tuition Assistance Program Grant (PTAP)

Undergraduate students, enrolled for 1-5 credit hours, who prove financial need. Virginia domicile required.

The amount of tuition and fees, or proven need, whichever is less.

Complete the FAFSA.

Senior Citizen Program

Senior citizens, age 60 or older,who have been legally domiciled in Virginia for a year. For credit courses, senior citizens must meet Virginia taxable income guidelines.

May take advantage of tuitionfree courses, on a space available basis,after paying students have been enrolled.

Contact the Central Admissions and Records Office.

Veteran’s Administration Educational Assistance

Veterans; active duty, Reserve &National Guard personnel; & certain spouses & children of veterans.

Varies according to the program.Usually a monthly benefit check.

Contact Enrollment Services, or the VA Regional Office in Roanoke,Virginia.

Virginia Guaranteed Assistance Program Grant (VGAP)

Initial awards made to first-time The amount of tuition and fees students enrolled full-time, who plus an allowance for books, or graduated from a Virginia high proven need, whichever is less. school with a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher. Must prove financial need, be a dependent student for federal

College Catalog 2016-2017

Complete the FAFSA and submit a copy of high school transcript to the Financial Aid Office.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE financial aid purposes, and Virginia domicile required. Virginia Military Survivors and Dependents Education Program(VMSDEP)

Children, ages 16 to 29, and Spouses of certain wounded, disabled, or deceased Virginia veterans or armed service personnel may be eligible for educational assistance.

The amount of the student’s tuition and required fees.

Contact Enrollment Services.

Vocational Rehabilitation

Students with disabilities.

Determined by the Virginia Department Rehabilitative Services.

Contact your local Rehabilitative Service Office.

Disbursement Students who are receiving financial aid will have their aid applied directly to tuition and fees. Financial aid recipients may use a portion of their award to purchase books and supplies at a campus bookstore if the amount of their financial aid award exceeds the cost of tuition and fees. Typically, students may begin charging books to their financial aid at least five days prior to the first day of classes. The last day to drop a class with a refund for the regular session is also the last day students may charge books and supplies to their financial aid. A student’s financial aid funds will be disbursed to student accounting after the census date has passed for all the classes in which they are enrolled. Refunds will be sent to the student by way of either direct deposit or a prepaid debit card. Refunds represent the amount of the student’s semester award, minus any funds used to pay tuition and fees or to purchase books and supplies. All services will be withheld from a student who owes money to Reynolds or who has books and materials outstanding from the Reynolds libraries. This means no transcripts will be issued, the student will not be permitted to re-register, and no other college services will be provided. Students must pay tuition and fees, or have sufficient anticipated aid by the published payment deadlines or they will be dropped from all or some courses for non-payment. Anticipated financial aid will hold a student’s registered classes if that aid is greater than or equal to the total tuition and fees. Students who want to use financial aid to pay bookstore charges must first register for classes. Students who are not certain if their aid is sufficient to cover their tuition and fees can contact Enrollment Services, a campus Business Office, or review the information in the Student Information System (SIS).

Students Attending Two Colleges at the Same Time Students who are enrolled at two different colleges or universities are not able to receive financial aid at both institutions. A student who is enrolled concurrently at Reynolds and another college must decide which college financial aid will be received and communicate that decision to the financial aid office of that institution.

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Students who receive financial aid from two different institutions as a result of concurrent enrollment will lose eligibility for further financial assistance and may be required to repay financial aid funds received at one of the institutions.

Impact of Drops/Withdrawals from Course(s) Students are eligible for a refund of tuition and fees paid for those credit hours dropped during the published drop period. After the published drop period has passed, there will be no refunds, except under the following conditions: major medical emergency, administrative error, extreme financial hardship, and certain situations where a financial aid recipient withdraws completely from Reynolds. In all cases of dropped courses, any financial aid the student received based on those credits will be canceled, and the student will owe funds to Reynolds and/or federal government. To obtain a refund during the published drop period, a student must complete an official Drop form and submit it to Enrollment Services. To request a refund after the published drop period, a student must complete a Tuition Refund/Late Drop Request Routing Slip. This form, along with documentation supporting the request, must be submitted to an Enrollment Services advisor. Federal and state financial aid regulations state that a student’s financial aid must be recalculated based on the number of calendar days they attended classes if he/she officially or unofficially withdraws from all classes on or before completing 60% of the semester or does not complete the entire semester. The calculated unearned portion of the total of Title IV funds awarded a student (Pell Grant, SEOG, Federal Direct Stafford Loan, Federal Direct PLUS Loan COMA, and VGAP) must be returned, according to the provisions of the Higher Education Amendments of 1998. The calculation of the return of these funds will likely result in the student owing a balance to Reynolds and/ or the federal government.

Satisfactory Academic Progress  Federal and state guidelines require that institutions monitor students’ academic progress towards the completion of a degree or certificate. Students must make satisfactory academic progress (SAP) from both qualitative and quantitative measures. SAP is measured by cumulative GPA, completion rate and maximum

College Catalog 2016-2017

FINANCIAL AID time frame. In order to be in compliance with SAP, a student must meet all three criteria. Failure to make satisfactory academic progress results in the loss of financial aid eligibility. Cumulative grade point average (GPA): A student must achieve a minimum grade point average which is listed below. Only nonremedial courses with grades of A, B, C, D, and F are included in this calculation. Transfer credits are not included in this calculation. Credit Hours Attempted

Minimum Expected GPA

1 - 15

1.5

16 - 30

1.75

–31+

2.0

Completion Rate: (Number of credit hours earned in relation to the number of credit hours attempted) Students must successfully complete two thirds (67%) of the credit hours attempted at the time satisfactory progress is assessed. By law, Reynolds must count developmental, ESL, and all credit courses. Successful completion is considered earned grades of A, B, C, D, P, or S. Courses are not considered successfully completed when grades of F, I, U, W, or R or missing grades are earned. Accepted transfer credits will be counted as both attempted and completed. Maximum Time Frame:  (Number of credit hours attempted in relation to number of credit hours necessary to complete the degree or certification program, including transfer credits). Students must complete their program within 150% of the program’s total credit requirements. Developmental credits are not included in this calculation. All non-developmental and transfer credits are included, regardless of whether or not financial aid was received.

Veterans Benefits Eligible veterans are entitled to receive certain educational benefits. The educational benefits for which an eligible veteran may qualify can only be used for courses taken towards the completion of a degree or certificate program. To receive these benefits, eligible veterans must: 1. Apply to use their Montgomery GI Bill benefits via the GI Bill website - gibill.va.gov. 2. Apply to Reynolds and be accepted into a degree or certificate program. 3. Register for classes and request certification each semester from the veterans certifying officer at a campus Enrollment Services. 4. Notify the certifying officer if repeating a course or taking a course for no credits. 5. Ensure college transcripts from any institutions previously attended are submitted to the Central Admissions and Records office.

College Catalog 2016-2017

6. Notify the certifying officer if he/she drops or withdraws from classes, or stops attending Reynolds. For more information on veterans benefits for educational assistance, contact the veterans certifying officer at [email protected] or any campus Enrollment Services at (804) 523-6464.

State Educational Assistance Programs  Information about benefits and eligibility for the programs listed below is available in the Central Admissions and Records Office: Senior Citizens Program (Policy 1-33):  Senior citizens 60 years of age or older and legally domiciled in Virginia for one year, as determined by the Application for In-state Tuition of the college application, may take advantage of tuition-free classes. For credit courses, senior citizens must also provide documentation indicating a taxable individual income not exceeding $15,000 for the year preceding the year in which enrollment is sought. Under this provision senior citizens may also register for and audit courses offered for academic credit regardless of income level. In any one term, regardless of income, senior citizens may take up to three courses for audit or enroll in non-credit courses. Requests from senior citizens to register for tuition-free classes will be considered beginning the first day of scheduled classes for each course for which they wish to register. All classes, credit and non-credit, must achieve a minimum enrollment of tuition-paying students, who will be accommodated before senior citizens participating in this program are enrolled. Senior citizens interested in utilizing this benefit should visit any campus Enrollment Services. Requests for tuition refunds will not be granted for senior citizens who enroll and pay for courses prior to the first day of class, in order to utilize the Senior Citizens Program. Additional information about this policy can be found at reynolds.edu/student_services/ policies.aspx Virginia Military Survivors and Dependents Education Program (VMSDEP):  This program provides education to spouses and children of military members killed, missing in action, taken prisoner, or who became at least 90 percent disabled as a result of military service in an armed conflict. Children, ages 16 to 29, and no age restriction for spouses, may be eligible for educational assistance at a state-supported college and university in Virginia, including community colleges. Children of Law Enforcement Officers:  Through this program, children, ages 16 to 25, of Virginia law enforcement officers, firefighters, or rescue squad members killed in the line of duty, may be eligible to receive payment for full tuition and fees.

Scholarships Through the kind generosity of individuals, businesses, and organizations, Reynolds offers scholarships to full-time and part-time students. Specific application criteria apply to each scholarship; however, students may apply for any or all scholarships by completing a Reynolds Scholarship application.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE The online application is available online between January and April and the deadline for submission is April 15 of each year. All scholarship awards are subject to availability of funds during the year of award. To apply for scholarships a student must: 1. Complete and submit an Application for Admission to Reynolds, if not currently attending 2. Complete and submit a Reynolds Scholarship Application online between January and April 15 (reynolds.edu/scholarship) 3. Be enrolled in a curricular/degree or certificate program 4. Submit a minimum of one letter of recommendation after completing the online application • High School Students: An instructor, advisor or administrator, employer, supervisor, community or social organization leader • Current College Students: A faculty member or advisor, employer, supervisor, community or social organization leader • Other Prospective Students: An employer, mentor, manager, etc. 5. Have a minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average 6. Incoming students and current students with less than 12 credit hours completed at Reynolds, should submit transcripts from their most recent school (college or high school) In order for your application to be considered, all parts of the application must be submitted on time. Supporting documents required to complete the application packet should be submitted through the Scholarship Application online.

Scholarship List This list is subject to change each year. For the most current listing of available scholarships, visit reynolds.edu/scholarship.  Alan Waters Memorial Endowed Scholarship Allison and James Aman Memorial Endowed Scholarship Association for Corporate Growth Scholarship Betty Green Parson Memorial Endowed Scholarship Brian Cho Memorial Scholarship Burford Leimenstoll Foundation of Betty Sams Christian School Clyde, Dorothy & Rand Pittman Memorial Endowed Scholarship Dennis and Hanh Hellenguard Endowed Scholarship Dennis Endowed Scholarship Dimitri and Maggie Georgiadis Endowed Scholarship Dual Enrollment Scholarship Earl Smith Memorial Scholarship Eric and Jeanette S. Lipman Endowed Scholarship Executive Women International ASIST Scholarship Follett Endowed Scholarship Fred McConnell Engineering Scholarship General Horticulture Scholarship George and Mae Bartek Endowed Scholarship George H. Flowers, Jr. Memorial Endowed Scholarship Gibb Family Veterans Scholarship Grace Crank Sargeant Memorial Endowed Scholarship Harry and Virginia Ritchie Memorial Scholarship Hope Fried Memorial Scholarship Hugh and Pat Rooney Endowed Scholarship Ida Chumakova Endowed Scholarship for Immigrant Students

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J. Franklin Sargeant Memorial Endowed Scholarship James Bauer Funkhouser Memorial Endowed Scholarship Jerry and Mary Owen Endowed Fund John Augustine Boothe Memorial/PAVE Scholarship John H. Wilton, Jr. Memorial Endowed Scholarship Kevin L. Rogers Memorial Scholarship Ladysmith Volunteer Fire Auxiliary Scholarship Lawrence C. Roderer Memorial Scholarship Lonnie Wolfe Memorial Scholarship Lucylle and Robert Gordon Endowed Scholarship Markel Corporation Endowed Scholarship Mary Jo Moton Scholarship Mary Morton Parsons Endowed Scholarship McCormick Scholarship Fund Nathan and Sophia Gumenick Family Endowed Scholarship Nelson Beane Memorial Scholarship Nunnally Healthcare Scholarships Pat Perkinson Memorial Scholarship Paul Rooney Memorial Scholarship Reynolds Classified Council Scholarship Reynolds Community College Board Scholarship Reynolds Faculty Scholarship Reynolds Family Scholarships in Memory of J. Sargeant Reynolds Robert A. Heinz Memorial Scholarship Robert Lane Memorial Automotive Endowed Scholarship Robert T. Greene, Sr. Memorial Scholarship Roland E. Moore Mathematics Scholarship Rose Marie Liggan Endowed Scholarship Rotary Club of Hanover County Scholarship Rotary Club of Henrico North Scholarship Rotary Club of Western Henrico/Becky Briggs Memorial   Scholarship S. A. Burnette Endowed Scholarship Sara Bruehl Memorial Scholarship School of Humanities & Social Sciences Scholarship Science Endowed Scholarship Short Pump Ruritan/Civic Foundation Endowed Scholarship Stuart & Bland Noel Memorial Endowed Scholarship Stuart B. Medlin Liberal Arts Endowed Scholarship Susan Lynn Pahle Memorial Scholarship Sutton-Jamerson Family Scholarship Tri Club Woman’s Club Scholarship Valley Proteins Fellowship-VFCCE VAMAC Endowed Scholarship Virginia Nonprofit Housing Coalition Scholarship West End Community Center Endowed Fund  

College Catalog 2016-2017

ADVISING

ADVISING Academic Advising Reynolds Advising Days Transfer Advising

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE  

Academic Advising Reynolds is committed to providing a variety of services to help students experience success. Academic advising, as one of these services, is designed to assist students in developing and following an educational plan that is meaningful and compatible with their educational and career goals. Academic advisors assist students with: selecting the appropriate program; developing a plan or timetable for completing the program; developing student and semester-specific course schedules; monitoring and following up on academic progress; identifying and making referrals to appropriate learning assistance opportunities as necessary; and re-evaluating career and educational goals in light of job market shifts and other considerations.

selecting their curriculum and electives. The center for Career, Employment, and Transfer houses specialists that can assist students with the selection of an appropriate institution and with the interpretation of its requirements. Students are advised that courses with grades below “C” normally are not accepted at other institutions. For further information see the Transfer Opportunities section of this catalog.

Advising services at Reynolds vary based on student needs. Trained academic advising specialists are available through Enrollment Services. All new students should meet with an Enrollment Services advising specialist prior to their first enrollment in Reynolds. During this initial session, the student’s educational and career goals are discussed in relationship to their academic preparation. Although faculty advisors are assigned to students during application process, curricular students are encouraged to receive support through their relationship with an advising specialist until they have successfully completed 15 credit hours. Non-curricular students should meet with an advising specialist regardless of the number of credit hours they have completed. For more information, call (804) 523-6464. Curricular students who have completed more than 15 credit hours are strongly encouraged to meet with their assigned faculty advisor each semester for assistance with course selection, developments relating to their educational and career objectives, and graduation requirements. All students, curricular and non-curricular, who are not in good academic standing, are blocked from self-advising and may be required to meet with their faculty advisor or a Retention Services specialist regardless of the number of credit hours they have completed. Students that are in good academic standing may choose to self-advise. Self-advising allows curricular students to select and schedule courses without their advisor’s approval each semester. However, students who self-advise agree to accept full responsibility for their course selection decisions and for following their curriculum requirements for graduation.

Reynolds Advising Days In support of Reynolds academic advising initiatives, specific advising days are designated each semester. These days provide an opportunity for faculty, staff, and students to focus on the advising function. Students approved to self-advise may make an appointment to consult with their assigned advisor, if they wish to do so.

Transfer Advising Students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university should become acquainted with the senior institution’s requirements in the intended major and be guided by those in

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College Catalog 2016-2017

STUDENT RESOURCES

STUDENT RESOURCES Academic Support Centers (Tutoring) 32 Campus Stores 32 Career, Employment and Transfer Centers 32 Center for the Deaf 32 College Success Skills Classes 33 Computer Labs 33 Counseling 33 Enrollment Services 33 Libraries 33 New Student Orientation 33 Program for Adults in Vocational Education (PAVE) 34 Resources for Students in Academic Difficulty 34 Services for Students with Disabilities 34 Student Life 35

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE  

Academic Support Centers (Tutoring) reynolds.edu/tutor The Academic Support Centers (ASC) are home to Reynolds' tutorial programs. Faculty and peer tutors provide one-on-one and small group tutorial conferences for Reynolds students. Tutoring is available free of charge to students currently enrolled in Reynolds credit courses. Students should check with the ASC on their campus to find out if tutors are available for the courses in which they wish to receive tutoring. ASC Tutors offer strategies that help students • • • • •

Define their assignment tasks Increase understanding of course materials Improve reading, writing, and computational skills Study effectively and manage their time efficiently Reduce test anxiety

ASC Tutors cannot • • • • •

Provide tutoring in courses that students have received a passing grade; in non-credit courses; in audited courses Provide tutoring for seniors in tuition-free courses Serve students in the College’s special programs that feature tutoring or reduced-size classes Do work assignments for students Assist students with take-home tests

For each course, students may use two 50-minute peer tutorial sessions per week. Walk-in sessions are available with faculty volunteers for some courses. Students should check with the ASC each term for walk-in tutoring opportunities. To receive tutoring, students must complete a Request for Tutoring application each term and bring a valid Reynolds ID. Request for Tutoring applications may be obtained from the Parham Road Campus and Downtown Campus locations or online at reynolds.edu/tutor. Additional learning assistance resources may be viewed at our website. Academic Support Center Locations and Contact Numbers: Downtown Campus Room 329 (804) 523-5687 Parham Road Campus  Room 102, Burnette Hall (804) 523-5927 Goochland Campus (804) 523-5927

Campus Store reynolds.edu/campus_store A campus store is located on the Downtown and Parham Road Campuses. There is also a temporary campus store at the Goochland Campus during the first week of classes each semester. Students have the option to purchase new, used, rental, or digital textbooks, supplies, Reynolds logo clothing and gifts, etc. The campus stores accept personal checks, major credit cards and Follett gift cards. Students receiving financial aid may only charge textbooks and supplies to their financial aid awards. Authorized agency charge accounts may be maintained for students who are financially supported by recognized state,

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federal, or private institutions. Students may charge to their financial aid or third party account during specific charge dates during each semester. Check with your local store for dates pertaining to a specific semester. Textbooks are stocked by course identification and section number, i.e., BUS 100 81PR. A full refund will be given in the original form of payment if textbooks are returned during the first week of classes with original receipt. With proof of schedule change and original receipt, a full refund will be given in the original form of payment up until the last day to drop with refund (with the exception of the summer semester). No refunds on unwrapped loose leaf books or access codes. Textbooks must be in original condition. No refunds or exchanges without original receipt. Students have the opportunity to sell textbooks back to the campus stores if they are in good condition. In order to sell back textbooks to the campus store, the student must present a valid Reynolds student ID. Students can sell their books back year round and can receive up to 50% back of the original purchasing price until our limits are reached during the week of finals. For general questions or additional information regarding the hours of operation for a specific campus, please contact the Reynolds Campus Store - Downtown at (804) 786-8580 and the Reynolds Campus Store - Parham Road at (804) 371-3266 or visit our websites at jsrdowntownshop.com and jsrparhamshop.com. For information about the Goochland Campus contact the store on Parham Road.

Career, Employment and Transfer Centers reynolds.edu/cet Through the Career, Employment and Transfer Center, Reynolds provides services for students and alumni in the process of career exploration, career development and employment preparation.   Career Specialists guide students in establishing career goals, planning and preparing for a chosen occupation.  Workshops on resume assistance, interview preparation and other career topics are regularly scheduled.  Individual appointments are also available. The Center maintains an electronic jobs board, College Central Network.  Students interested in full time, part time or summer positions or internships should visit collegecentral.com/ Reynolds to view job announcements. The staff of the CETC can assist students in researching senior institutions, academic programs and admission requirements.   Additionally the CETC sponsors numerous events to help students make connections with recruitment officers and other academic representatives of four year colleges in Virginia and the regional area. 

Center for the Deaf reynolds.edu/accommodations The Center for the Deaf, which is a part of the Office of Student Accommodations (OSA) at the Reynolds Downtown Campus, coordinates support services for the Deaf and hard of hearing enrolled in college programs. Students who require services,

College Catalog 2016-2017

STUDENT RESOURCES inclusive of interpreters, note taking auxiliary supports and quiet testing environments must contact Accommodations office.

College Success Skills Classes reynolds.edu/sdv Student development courses (SDV 100,101, and 108) provide students with information and experiences which help them succeed in college. Career development, study skills, academic advising, financial literacy and college policies and procedures are covered in this class. Instructors provide individual assistance and referrals to students as needed. Completion of an SDV course is required for all students enrolled in associate, applied associate and certificate programs, and is a general education requirement within the Virginia Community College System. It is taken within the student’s first 15 credit hours at Reynolds. Special topic SDV 101 and 109 classes are offered for students participating in Learning Communities, Teacher Education, Leadership Development and specific majors such as Culinary Arts.

Computer Labs reynolds.edu/labs Reynolds provides students access to a wide range of software applications in support of academic programs at the college. Computers and mobile devices are available in the three campus Libraries, and computers are also available at the Downtown Campus Academic Computing Center. Support for the computers is provided by the Department of Technology, and the unit Academic & Instructional Computing Support. These computers have much of the necessary software to complete coursework. If the software needed for a class is not available, please contact your instructor for additional access information. Hours of operation for Computer Labs are based on the scheduled hours that the Libraries are open. Visit library.reynolds.edu/services/ calendar.html for more information. Downtown Campus  Room 214 (804) 523-5032 Goochland Campus – Library Room 200, Main Building (804) 523-5419 Parham Road Campus – Library Room 103, LTC (804) 523-5220

Counseling Students experiencing non-academic difficulties should contact the Office of Student Affairs at (804) 523-6464. Staff is able to help students connect with appropriate community resources. Reynolds does not provide personal or mental health counseling.

Enrollment Services reynolds.edu/enrollment Enrollment Services provide services and resources to meet the specialized needs of students in a centralized location. Specifically, Enrollment Services provide advising services to new

College Catalog 2016-2017

and returning students in the areas of admissions, registration, financial aid, academic advising, and veteran’s services. Academic advising within Enrollment Services is designed to facilitate a seamless transition into Reynolds and to provide institutional support that will encourage academic success, and assist students with clarification of their academic and career goals. Curricular students are encouraged to utilize academic advising services within Enrollment Services through the completion of the first 15 academic credits. Non-curricular students are encouraged to utilize academic advising services through Enrollment Services regardless of the number of credit hours they have completed.  For more information, call (804) 523-6464, email [email protected], or visit Enrollment Services on any of our three Reynolds campuses.

Libraries library.reynolds.edu Our mission is to provide an environment where students, faculty and staff can meet their learning and teaching needs and develop lifelong habits of learning, self-improvement, free inquiry and free expression. Consistent with the Reynolds mission, we are committed to providing innovative and quality resources and services to students to ensure their academic success. Reynolds Library offers: • Premium computers with high-speed Internet access and MS Office Suite • Over 90,000 books in print and 35,000 eBooks  • Approximately 400 print periodicals and over 180 online databases that provide access to millions of full-text journal, magazine and newspaper articles • Group Study Rooms for collaborative projects • Wi-fi throughout the campuses • Research consultation in person, by phone, email, and via 24/7 live chat • Workshops on various topics to help you improve your research skills, overall academic achievement, and lifelong learning. Library databases are accessible 24/7 from off-campus with a MyREYNOLDS login. Students may also submit an inter-library loan request online or check out books from any participating member library of VIVA Cooperative Borrowing Program (www.vivalib.org/borrowing). Downtown Campus Library (804) 523-5333 Goochland Campus Library (804) 523-5419 Parham Road Campus Library (804) 523-5329

New Student Orientation reynolds.edu/orientation The Office of First-Year Initiatives supports efforts to provide a successful start for new students at Reynolds by offering oncampus and online orientation programs for new students.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Reynolds offers two ways for new students to become oriented to Reynolds: • New first-time college students for the fall semester are invited to participate in on-campus orientation known as SOAR (Student Orientation, Advising & Registration).  • Look for our new online orientation link www.go2reynolds.com coming soon.  • Students entering for the spring semester are also encouraged to attend an orientation-only program before classes begin.   SOAR sessions are designed to assist students with the following: • Learn about student success resources at Reynolds.  • Have placement test score results interpreted for accurate placement in courses. • Answer any questions related to academic programs or course requirements.  • Establish a sound class schedule for the upcoming term. • Become familiar with Blackboard and the Reynolds Student Information System. • Learn the location of campus resources.  • Gain a better understanding of Reynolds, college policies, and attendance.   Research has shown that students who participate in SOAR before their first semester have higher first semester grade point averages, stay in college longer, and have an easier transition into college. SOAR sessions require advance registration. Please contact [email protected] or (804) 523-5900 for more information.

Program for Adults in Vocational Education (PAVE) reynolds.edu/pave The Program for Adults in Vocational Education (PAVE) is a twoyear career studies certificate program that provides vocational and technical training for adults with intellectual disabilities, severe learning disabilities and emotional disabilities. Certificates are awarded in the following areas: Child Care Assistant, Clerical Assistant, Food Service Assistant, and Health Care Assistant. The overall purpose of PAVE is to provide post-secondary training programs that incorporate functional academic instruction, job skills training, and community-based internships, which prepares the student to apply for employment in the competitive job market. Successful completion of a Career Studies Certificate through PAVE can lead to the development of effective work skills and increased confidence in the work place. Applicants must meet both the College’s general admission requirements and the program’s specific requirements. These requirements include: completion of a high school program with a diploma recognized by the Virginia Community College System (VCCS), or GED; and possession of social skills necessary to function independently among peers in the college environment. For additional information regarding the PAVE program, call  (804) 523-5572 (VOICE), email [email protected], or use the 711 Relay system for any number at Reynolds.

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Resources for Students in Academic Difficulty reynolds.edu/retention Students whose academic standing is academic probation or suspension, or students who wish to be readmitted after dismissal from Reynolds should meet with an academic advisor through the Office of Retention Services. Referral to a Retention Services can be made through the Enrollment Services on any campus.  SAILS (Student Assistance and Intervention for Learning Strategies) is an early alert program designed to help students during the semester before they run into long-term academic trouble. Students receiving an email from their instructor through this initiative may also receive one from a Student Success Coach or advisor who can provide them with additional academic support.

Services for Students with Disabilities reynolds.edu/accommodations Reynolds complies with both the letter and the spirit of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADA AA) and other laws protecting the rights of individuals with disabilities. The Office of Student Accommodations (OSA) seeks to provide access to educational opportunities for individuals with disabilities by removing barriers and providing programmatic and physical access to participate. Students with documented disabilities may request reasonable accommodations through the OSA office. In order to be eligible for accommodation, students must comply with the institution’s established process. Reynolds does not exclude any otherwise qualified individuals, solely by reason of their disability, from participation in any programs or services offered by Reynolds. Services and accommodations are provided to students with a variety of disabilities including and not limited to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders, blindness/low vision, deafness/ hard of hearing, learning disabilities, mobility and chronic health, psychological disorders (including Autism Spectrum disorders) and other impairments. The OSA staff encourages and assists students in their understanding of the nature of their disability and its impact on their learning and participating in Reynolds community College. Students are provided with opportunities to learn about their rights and responsibilities, procedures for requesting accommodations and about the wide range of programs and opportunities available at Reynolds and the surrounding community. Student planning to request accommodations services from OSA are encouraged to contact the OSA at least 3 weeks from the start of the semester they plan to enroll. For additional information contact the Student accommodations office Downtown Campus: (804)523-5628, Parham Road campus & Goochland Campus (804) 523-5290: Relay system 711 for any number at Reynolds, and email at OSA @reynolds.edu.

College Catalog 2016-2017

STUDENT RESOURCES Student Life reynolds.edu/studentlife The Office of Student Life is dedicated to providing social, educational, leadership, recreational and service activities that promote student engagement and learning, cultural awareness, and social responsibility. The office emphasizes the importance of respect by creating an environment where students can freely express their opinions and beliefs with good intentions of achieving a common goal. Reynolds has many active student clubs. Getting involved in student clubs and organizations is an exciting way for students to meet fellow students, develop leadership skills, and enhance their classroom experiences. By planning or participating in student activities, students can help make a positive impact. Students who do not find an on-campus club that meets their interests are welcome to work with the Office of Student Life to start a new club. Applications for JSR LEAD, the Reynolds student leadership development program, are accepted at the beginning of each fall semester. Students should contact the Office of Student Life or the Office of First-Year Initiatives for more information. The Office of Student Life coordinates trips to sporting events, theaters, and four-year colleges and universities. It also plans a variety of student activities, fairs, speakers, community service activities, free fitness classes and sports tournaments for students. In addition, Student Life oversees the Student Life Game Centers located at the Parham Road and Downtown Campuses and Student Lounge at the Goochland Campus. For more information, call (804) 523-5983, (804) 523-5082, or email [email protected]

College Catalog 2016-2017

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

SPECIALTY PROGRAMS Center for Distance Learning Fully Online Degree and Certificate Programs Teacher Preparation Teacher Licensure Requirements for the Community College Student Virginia Teaching Scholarship Loan Program Professional Development for School Personnel EducateVA Career Switcher Program Community College Workforce Alliance Reynolds Advance College Academy High School Dual Enrollment Weekend College Middle College Great Expectations English as a Second Language Learning Communities Reynolds Honors Program

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College Catalog 2016-2017

SPECIALTY PROGRAMS  

Center for Distance Learning The Center for Distance Learning enables and supports learning options in a variety of settings through innovative, alternative delivery methods that provide access to learning opportunities from your home, office, or anywhere you have Internet access. These options are designed to increase educational access for students for whom work schedules, family responsibilities, or other life demands restrict attendance at traditional on-campus classes. Distance learning offers educational opportunities for career advancement, transfer to a four-year college or university, job re-certifications, completion of requirements for a certificate, Associate’s degree, or study for personal enrichment.  Reynolds Community College now offers two types of distance learning: Online courses: All course work and interactions with the instructor and classmates are completed online. The course is accessed through the Blackboard course management system. Courses may require virtual proctors. Online courses with in-person or proctor requirement:  Most of the instruction is online. However, students may be required make a limited number of trips to a campus site for labs, presentations, and/or other class activities or to a community site for clinicals or internships. Many courses may require proctored testing that can be done at Reynolds testing centers, testing sites at other VCCS college, or any approved site outside of the state of Virginia. The course schedule section notes will indicate the specific type of distance learning course for that section. Students should carefully read section notes before registering for a distance learning course. To enroll in distance learning courses at Reynolds, students must have reliable Internet access, a college-issued email account, and telephone/cell phone access or be able to go to a Reynolds campus to access the computer lab, the library, and other student support resources. To be successful in any distance learning course, students must be independent learners with proficient reading, writing, research and computer skills. Distance learning students should be able to commit to a consistent schedule that may include a minimum of 8-10 hours per week of study for each course. Before enrolling in distance learning courses, students must take the Reynolds placement tests, including the SmarterMeasure, and complete any recommendations and course prerequisites. To learn more about distance learning at Reynolds and to experience an online course, all new distance learning students will be expected to complete CDL 001 -Orientation to Learning Online prior to the start of their distance learning classes. For answers to questions about distance learning options and requirements, visit the Center for Distance Learning online at reynolds.edu/cde or contact the Center for Distance Learning at

College Catalog 2016-2017

[email protected] or (804) 523-5612 or (800) 711-1628 (Virginia only).

Fully Online Degree and Certificate Programs Some courses may require campus labs, seminars, demonstrations, community clinical, and/or proctored exams. School of Business Business Administration AS  Criminal Justice CSC Cyber Security CSC Entrepreneurship in Small Business CSC Network Administration CSC  Real Estate Agent/Broker CSC The following programs can be completed online with the exceptions noted: Information Systems Technology Microcomputer Applications Specialization AAS *except a seminar and project course Management Small Business Management Specialization AAS *except a coordinated internship course Microcomputer Applications CSC *except a seminar and project course School of Humanities and Social Sciences Early Childhood Development AAS Early Childhood Development C Early Childhood Education CSC Early Childhood Education – Advanced CSC General Education C Liberal Arts AA Social Sciences AS School of Mathematics, Science, and Engineering Science AS - Science Specialization School of Nursing and Allied Health Advanced Medical Coder CSC Medical Records Coder CSC Opticians Apprentice CSC Pre-Medical Lab Technology CSC Pre-Nursing CSC Pre-Respiratory Therapy CSC Release of Heath Information Specialist CSC The following programs can be completed online with exception of labs and clinical, which must be completed at an approved site: Medical Laboratory Technology AAS Opticianry AAS Respiratory Therapy AAS AAS Associate of Applied Science AA Associate of arts  AS Associate of Science C Certificate CSC Career Studies Certificate

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Teacher Preparation Students can complete their first two years of teacher preparation courses in the Pre-Teacher Education Program (PTEP), receive an associate degree from Reynolds, and then transfer to a four-year college or university. Several Virginia fouryear institutions offer transfer opportunities for P-TEP students. Reynolds offers Teacher Preparation Specialization associate degrees in Science, Social Sciences, and Liberal Arts for prospective teachers that transfer to Virginia’s four-year colleges and universities. Reynolds advisors work closely with students to ensure optimum transferability. Reynolds also has transfer centers with catalogs and transfer guides from many four-year colleges. It is highly recommended that P-TEP students determine what content area and/or grade level they would like to teach, as well as the school to which they wish to transfer. The transfer process for P-TEP students can be complicated. It is very important for you to meet with your advisor and a counselor from the Career, Employment and Transfer Center. Additionally, you should communicate directly with your transfer school. This will help to ensure that you maximize your time at Reynolds. PROGRAM NOTE: The Virginia Department of Education has the authority to deny licensure to any applicant as described in 8VAC20-22-720 of the Licensure Regulations for School Personnel. Any student entering the Pre-Teacher Education Program (P-TEP) who has committed any illegal offense other than minor traffic violations should discuss these matters with the Program Head for Teacher Preparation prior to enrolling in SDV 101 Orientation to Teacher Preparation and/or EDU 200 Introduction to Teaching as a Profession for clarification. Reynolds requires a criminal history records check of all entering P-TEP students. Inability to obtain field experience site placement due to a negative background check will result in removal from the program.

Teacher Licensure Requirements for the Community College Student The Virginia Board of Education has established general requirements for initial teacher licensure. The candidate must be at least 18 years of age; have earned a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution of higher education with a Board-approved teacher education program; possess good moral character; have satisfied requirements for a teaching endorsement area; have met general and professional studies requirements (including student teaching), and have obtained passing scores on the RVE: Reading for Virginia Educators (for certain endorsement areas), the VCLA: Virginia Communication and Literacy Assessment, and the appropriate Specialty Area test (Praxis™ II). Additionally, transfer institutions require students to successfully complete the Praxis™ Core Academic Skills for Educators (Reading, Writing and Mathematics) prior to enrollment in their teacher preparation programs. More information regarding these requirements can be obtained from the Program Head for Teacher Preparation. The teaching license provides the prospective teacher with a credential to serve as a teacher in Virginia while the endorsement

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describes the subject area or grade levels to which the prospective teacher may be appropriately assigned to teach. Students seeking licensure at the elementary level (grades PreK-3 or PreK-6) may major in a wide range of disciplines. Most transfer institutions have a specific degree that is required for students pursuing elementary education licensure. Contact your transfer institution or the Program Head for Teacher Preparation for additional information. Students seeking licensure at the middle school level (grades 6-8), should select one of the four basic content areas mathematics, a science, history/social science or English—as a major. To increase your employability you may choose to pursue a second content area if possible during your course of studies. Students seeking licensure to teach at the secondary level (grades 6-12) major in the area in which they will seek endorsement. Possible majors include, but are not limited to, biology, chemistry, computer science, English, French, German, history, mathematics, physics, political science, and Spanish. Special education students may choose a major from the humanities, social sciences, or sciences. Students who have decided on their teacher licensure endorsement area and selected their four-year transfer institution should contact their advisor to explore whether a Teacher Education Admission Agreement exists between the Virginia Community College System and that institution. The advisor can provide further information about the requirements and benefits of the agreement.

Virginia Teaching Scholarship Loan Program The Virginia Teaching Scholarship Loan Program is an incentive to students interested in pursuing a teaching career in a critical shortage teaching area. These scholarships begin in the junior year. The critical shortage teaching areas are determined annually, but usually include fields such as special education, mathematics, earth science, career and technical education, foreign language, English as a second language, middle grades, library media, art, and reading specialist. More information is available from the Virginia Department of Education at doe.virginia.gov.

Professional Development for School Personnel Reynolds Community College provides credit-based coursework for teachers and school divisions. We offer a wide variety of licensure renewal courses and can develop customized courses for cohorts, schools and/or divisions. Contact the Program Head for Teacher Preparation for additional information.

EducateVA Career Switcher Program The Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA) offers an alternative licensure program – EducateVA – a statewide initiative to address critical shortages in the teaching profession

College Catalog 2016-2017

SPECIALTY PROGRAMS throughout the Commonwealth, allowing you to bring your dream of teaching into reality. The EducateVA Career Switcher Program is approved by the Virginia Department of Education/ Division of Teacher Education, Licensure, and Professional Practice. Teaching as a second career is as wide spread throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia as our Career Switcher backgrounds. EducateVA has assisted professionals from engineering, medical, manufacturing and sales industries to begin a new or second career in teaching. Whether you are looking for a teaching position in Richmond, Hampton Roads, Danville, Harrisonburg, Northern Virginia, Roanoke Valley or Southwest Virginia, switching careers can be a rewarding experience and a longtime dream accomplished. Teach Middle or High School Math, Science, English, Social Studies, World Languages (preK-12), English as a Second Language (preK-12), Health & Physical Education (preK-12) or a Career and Technical Education subject such as Business, Marketing, Technology Education, or Family & Consumer Sciences. Do You Qualify? • • • • • • •

Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution Five (5) or more years of full time professional, postbaccalaureate work experience Content area expertise  GPA of 2.5 or better  Required assessments (Praxis II and VCLA) Must be willing to undergo a criminal background check prior to field placement or employment in the classroom May not currently hold a Provisional License or expired Provisional License issued by the Virginia Department of Education or a full professional teaching license in Virginia or another state

What is Required? • • •

Complete the 18-week Level 1 program, which includes 40 hours of classroom field experience Upon successful completion of Level 1, a one-year Career Switcher Provisional License is issued During Level II, candidates must teach successfully for one full year while completing additional online training and instructor-led sessions in order to be recommended for a full five-year renewable teaching license

Community College Workforce Alliance Community College Workforce Alliance (CCWA), the workforce development partnership between Reynolds Community College and John Tyler Community College, serves the training needs of the region with a comprehensive suite of courses and services. The partnership combines the strengths of the two colleges in order to provide the highest quality of training in four cities and 12 counties throughout Central Virginia. CCWA serves about 10,000 participants and 700 employers annually. CCWA provides non-credit training, individual and customdesigned instruction, consulting, skills assessments and educational programs. CCWA offers on-line registration, customer support and courses delivered by adjunct faculty with related industry experience and expertise. These adult trainers have the

College Catalog 2016-2017

skills and certifications to assist both employers and individuals to achieve their professional development and strategic business goals. With a focus on responding to regional business needs, CCWA works with new and expanding businesses in the areas of recruitment and candidate assessments to identify employee skills, to design and conduct startup operations or to facilitate the retooling of training programs. CCWA consultants help employers develop comprehensive and effective training programs that produce a return on investment. Programs (including many industry certifications) and services may be offered at one of CCWA’s three locations, online, or at client locations. Non-credit classes include, but are not limited to: Management & Supervision Computer Applications  Contractor/Tradesmen Licensing Courses IT Programming/Systems/Networking and Certification Prep Quality Improvement Professional Certifications  Human Resource Management Customer Service Writing & Communications Healthcare  Teacher & Childhood Education  Operations Management  Workplace Spanish Project Management Certification Prep Truck Driver Training (CDL) ISO & Productivity Manufacturing & Engineering Individuals are not required to apply for admission to the colleges in order to take CCWA classes. Participants can register phone, fax, walk-in and on-line (ccwatraining.org). Facility rentals and meeting services are available for business meetings, conferences, corporate training sessions and events. CCWA also offers skills assessments and testing services. Find CCWA online at ccwatraining.org. CCWA locations include: Henrico:  Workforce Development and Conference Center (on the campus of Reynolds Community College) 

1651 Parham Road (Richmond)  (804) 523-CCWA (2292) Chester: Bird Hall (on the campus of John Tyler Community College)

13101 Jefferson Davis Highway (Chester)  (804)706-5175 Midlothian: Elides Hall, 2nd Floor (on the campus of John Tyler Community College)

800 Charter Colony Parkway (Midlothian)  (804) 440-2447

Reynolds Advance College Academy The Reynolds Advance College Academies (ACA) provide outstanding high school students the opportunity to earn an associate degree while completing the requirements for

39

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE their high school diploma. Reynolds has carefully selected and sequenced the college coursework in the program in order to satisfy the requirements of the high school diploma and associate degree at the same time. Students typically apply to an ACA in the 8th grade through their local school division, enroll in advanced high school courses in the 9th and 10th grade, and take the required college coursework for the associate degree during the 11th and 12th grade. Students in the ACA program are required to attend a five-week session of college courses during the summer between their sophomore and junior year. For more information, visit reynolds.edu/aca.

High School Dual Enrollment The Dual Enrollment Program at Reynolds is offered to high school juniors and seniors enrolled in one of the local participating schools. This program allows students to take college-level courses that fulfill both high school and college graduation requirements. Currently, Reynolds has agreements to offer the Dual Enrollment program with the following schools or school systems:  Bridging Communities Center for Career & Technical Education, CATEC, Goochland County, Hanover County, Henrico County, Louisa County, Powhatan County, Richmond City and Salem Christian School. Interested high school students should speak with their school counselor. For more information about admission and enrollment requirements, visit reynolds.edu/get_started/ dual_enrollment.

Weekend College Reynolds Weekend College enables students to complete all requirements for specified programs within one calendar year. Starting in fall semester and ending in summer semester of the subsequent year, Weekend College enables students to integrate face-to-face courses taught on Fridays and Saturdays at the Parham Road Campus with hybrid and online course sections. Reynolds offers the following programs through the Weekend College: Certificate Programs •

General Education Certificate and Core (Includes all general education requirements for transferable associate degrees)

Great Expectations The Great Expectations program at Reynolds offers college transition services to young adults who are or were recently affiliated with the Virginia Foster Care System. Services include assistance with choosing an academic program, guidance through the admissions and financial aid processes, access to college support services, and referrals to and collaboration with community resources and services. For more information, visit reynolds.edu/get_started/great_expectations.aspx.

English as a Second Language Reynolds offers classes for students whose first language is not English. Classes and counseling are designed to help students successfully speak English in and out of class. Day and evening classes meet on the Parham Road Campus and follow the Reynolds academic calendar. For full details, visit reynolds.edu/ get_started/esl.aspx.

Learning Communities A learning community is when two (or more) course sections in the same semester are linked together and the same students enroll in both course sections. Professors work together to coordinate assignments, content, and improve crossover learning between the courses. Classes are typically back-to-back, or at the same time on alternating days. Learn more about the benefits of learning communities and the courses offered each semester at reynolds.edu/lc.

Reynolds Honors Program The Reynolds Honors Program offers high-achieving students an opportunity to participate in more advanced academic coursework based on four foundational pillars: critical thinking, reading, and writing; independent research; interdisciplinary approaches; and student engagement. These foundations help create a community of highly motivated and intellectually curious students who, through collaboration with dedicated faculty, will be prepared for the challenges of university degree programs and beyond. For more information, visit www.reynolds.edu/honors.

Career Studies Certificate Programs • • • • •

Microcomputer Applications  Microsoft Network Administration  Network Engineering Pharmacy Technician Substance Abuse Counseling Education

For more information, visit reynolds.edu/weekendcollege.

Middle College The Middle College program is currently being revised to better serve the needs of the students and the community. Additional information is available at reynolds.edu/MiddleCollege.

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College Catalog 2016-2017

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 

Enrollment Policies & Procedures Classification of Students Registration Information Registration Periods Self-Registration Academic Course Load Prerequisites and Course Sequencing Repeating a Course Withdrawal from Courses Auditing a Course Military Students During National Emergency Non-Native Speakers of English (English Proficiency)

Student Policies & Procedures 43 43 43 43 43 43 43 43 44 44 44

Student Rights and Responsibilities Student Complaint Student Grievance Academic Renewal Student Conduct Academic Honesty Student Sexual Misconduct Substance Abuse Student Assessment Reynolds Community College, Virginia Community College System, Information Technology Student/Patron Acceptable Use Agreement

56 56 56 56 56 56 57 57 57

57

Classroom & Instructional Policies & Procedures Grading — Developmental Studies 46 Grade Point Average 46 Repeated Grade 46 Final Grades 46 Academic Renewal 46 Academic Standing 46 Reinstatement from Suspension or Dismissal 47 Advanced Standing and Transfer Credit from other Colleges 47 Transfer Credit from International Institutions 48 Credit by Assessment by Local Exam (ABLE) 48 Prior Learning Activity for Credit Evaluation 48 Military Credit 48 Credit for Occupational Experience 48 Credit by Advanced Placement 48 Graduation and Program Requirements 52 Change of Curriculum (Program/Plan) 53 Waiver and Substitution of Course Requirements 53 Student Records 53 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 53 Notice Regarding Directory Information 54

College Catalog 2016-2017

41

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Enrollment Policies & Procedures

42

College Catalog 2016-2017

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES  

Classification of Students Curricular Curricular students are students who have satisfied general college curricular and any additional program admission requirements and are enrolled in credit or developmental courses for the purpose of earning a degree, certificate, or career studies certificate. Non-Curricular Non-curricular students are students who are enrolled in credit and/or developmental courses without curricular admission and who do not currently intend to earn a degree, certificate, or career studies certificate at Reynolds. The Virginia Community College System recognizes the following types of non-curricular enrollments: Upgrading Skills for Present Job Developing Skills for New Job Career Exploration Personal Satisfaction and General Knowledge Transient Student Non-degree Transfer Student High School Student  (Dual/Concurrent enrollment/Home School enrollment) Curricular Admission Pending Freshman Students are classified as freshmen until they have earned 30 semester credits. Sophomore Students are classified as sophomores after they have earned more than 30 semester credits.

Registration Information Current information about the registration schedule and procedures can be found for each semester/term on the Reynolds website at reynolds.edu.

Registration Periods

Self-Registration Students who are in good academic standing (2.0 GPA or higher) and who are either non-curricular or curricular may generally register (without approval) online. All other students are required to meet with their advisors before registering in person.

Academic Course Load A full-time course load is 12 or more credit hours. Any student wishing to carry an academic load of more than 18 credits should have a 3.0 GPA or higher and should have the recommendation of a faculty advisor prior to seeking the approval of the school dean. This approval must be presented in person when registering beyond the limit. A student who has received academic warning or academic probation may be required to take less than the normal load for the next semester.

Prerequisites and Course Sequencing If any prerequisites are required before enrolling in a course, they will be identified in the course description or by an indication of course sequence (please refer to the Course Information section of this catalog). Courses listed ACC 211-212 and ENG 111-112, for example, must be taken in sequence unless otherwise noted in the course description. Courses in special sequences (usually identified by the numerals I-II) must also be taken in sequence, unless otherwise noted in the course description. Prerequisites must be satisfactorily completed before enrolling in a course unless special permission is obtained from the school dean, or designee. Co-requisite courses are to be taken simultaneously.

Repeating a Course Students are normally limited to two (2) enrollments in the same course. Prior to registering to take a course for a third time, students must submit a completed Request to Repeat Course Form with all required approvals, and documentation of extenuating circumstances to a campus Enrollment Services. Repeat approval is not required for certain exempted courses, and all attempted hours and grade points for these courses will be calculated in the GPA. (Also see Repeated Grade.)

Priority registration periods for a term are scheduled before the open registration period, primarily to provide priority to continuing curricular students. Priority registration is available only online. High school students intending to register for classes must register during the open registration period on campus.

PLEASE NOTE:Repeating courses may negatively affect financial

Open registration periods are available to students to register in person or online. Students that have academic or financial holds must come to campus for registration.   Late registration periods are scheduled for each semester or term to permit adjustment of class schedules. Except under extenuating circumstances, students may not enter a new class after the add/drop period. Requests for entry after this time must receive special approval.

Students are strongly encouraged to meet with the instructor of the course to discuss their academic standing in the course prior to withdrawing from the course. Withdrawal transactions are final and will not be rescinded or modified unless an administrative error by Reynolds has taken place.

College Catalog 2016-2017

aid eligibility.

Withdrawal from Courses

On-Time Withdrawals After the add/drop period and within the first 60% of a semester or term, a student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty and receive a grade of “W” for each withdrawn course. After that time, students shall receive a grade of “F,” except under documented mitigating circumstances.

43

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE The student must submit a completed “Request to Withdraw from Course” form to one of the Enrollment Services prior to the college’s published withdrawal deadline. The form must be submitted prior to the completion of 60% of the class. Students should consult their instructor for withdrawal deadlines for classes that are not the standard semester length. Late Withdrawals Withdrawal requests received after 60% of the semester or term will not be granted except under mitigating circumstances. To request a withdrawal after the appropriate withdrawal deadline or after the term has ended, the student must submit a “Late Request for Withdrawal from Course” Form with a narrative and documentation to support a claim of mitigating circumstances to a campus Enrollment Services. Requests for late withdrawals are forwarded to the Academic Standing Committee for determination. In certain very unusual circumstances (such as extended hospitalization past the end of a term), withdrawals with grades of “W” may be granted after the end of a semester or term and under the conditions described above. For more information about late withdrawals, contact Enrollment Services at (804) 523-6464. Official withdrawal for a student, if approved, will become effective on the date the withdrawal form is received by the Enrollment Services. Course withdrawals (on time and late) should be presented in person or by the student’s authorized representative.

Auditing a Course

Ireland, the United Kingdom, New Zealand, or the United States will be required to demonstrate their proficiency in English prior to enrollment. To document English proficiency, applicants may forward TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores or appropriate substitute documents to the Central Admissions and Records Office. A minimum score of 80 is required on the iBT TOEFL. Appropriate substitute documents would include completion of a post-secondary degree or the equivalent of ENG 111 (English Composition) with a grade of ‘C’ or better at an institution located in one of the countries listed above. Nonnative speaking applicants who cannot present the minimum required TOEFL score or a substitute document must schedule an English as a Second Language (ESL) test with the ESL office. Reynolds ESL assessment will also involve a personal interview and submission of a written assignment. Questions about ESL test waivers should be directed to the ESL Department. The ESL assessment will result in one of the following: • Clearance to take the Reynolds VPT placement tests with native speakers of English (no ESL classes required); • Initial placement into intensive ESL classes only (no academic classes permitted until ESL department documents preparedness); or, • Initial placement into certain ESL classes with permission to enroll in a limited area of academic subjects. NOTE: Admitted students with ESL requirements will be required to satisfactorily complete the requirements prior to progressing in certain curricular programs, such as Nursing. Please refer to the Program Information section in this Catalog. F-1 Visa applicants should refer to the International Student Admission section in this catalog.

Students who enroll in a course with audit status are exempt from course examinations or other course achievement measures. Registrations for audit will not be accepted before the late registration period each semester and will require approval of the instructor and school dean. The regular tuition rates will be charged. Requests for credit enrollment in a class will be given priority over audit enrollment. Audited courses carry no credit and do not count as part of the student’s course load. Students who wish to change the status of  a course from audit to credit or from credit to audit must do so within the add/drop period for the semester or session.

Military Students During National Emergency Reserves/National Guard who are called to active duty and active military that are mobilized during a National Emergency should contact a Enrollment Services for special assistance with their enrollment needs at (804) 523-6464.

Non-Native Speakers of English (English Proficiency) Admitted curricular and non-curricular students from countries other than Australia, English speaking Canadian provinces, English speaking Caribbean island nations, the Republic of

44

College Catalog 2016-2017

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Classroom & Instructional Policies & Procedures

College Catalog 2016-2017

45

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE  

Grading — Developmental Studies A grade of “S” (Satisfactory) shall be assigned for satisfactory completion of each course in developmental studies or English as a Second Language (ESL) courses numbered 1 - 99. “S” grades are not included in grade point average calculations.

Periodically the VCCS will rename or renumber courses but they remain equivalent to the previous named and numbered courses. In such cases, completion of a renumbered/renamed course may be determined to be a repeat of a course completed previously under a different department and/or course number. These determinations are made on a college-wide basis, and exceptions cannot be made for an individual student.

Students making satisfactory progress but not completing all of the instructional objectives for courses in developmental studies or ESL courses shall be graded with an “R” (Re-enroll). A student who has earned an “R” must enroll again and successfully complete the course.

Implementation of this policy does not revise any GPA calculations for prior terms or any academic, financial, or administrative events that have occurred in the past. Any questions should be directed to the Registrar.

Students not making satisfactory progress in developmental studies or ESL courses shall be given a “U” grade. Students on financial aid should check each semester on their grade requirements for making satisfactory progress.

Final Grades

The “I” and “W” grades may be utilized, as appropriate, for developmental studies and ESL courses.

Grade Point Average The term and cumulative grade point average (GPA) is determined by dividing the total number of grade points earned in courses by the total number of credits attempted. Courses which do not generate grade points are not included in credits attempted (audits, developmental courses, ESL courses, courses taken with pass/unsatisfactory option). The GPA is carried out to three digits past the decimal point (i.e. there is no rounding). See Repeated Grade and Academic Renewal sections below.

Repeated Grade Effective with the Summer 1994 term, the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) implemented a policy which provided that when a course was repeated, only the most recent attempt would be used in the calculation of the student’s cumulative grade point average (GPA). This policy only applied to courses attempted and repeated during or after the Summer 1994 term. While only the most recent attempt was used in the calculation of the cumulative GPA, all previous attempts remained on the academic record. Effective with the Fall 1996 semester, the policy was made retroactive to Summer 1988. Therefore, when students repeat a course taken Fall 1996 or later that was repeated Summer 1988 or later, only the most recent attempt is used to calculate the cumulative GPA. Courses completed and repeated during the initial period of the repeat policy (Summer 1994 - Summer 1996) for which GPA adjustments have already been made, are not affected. Additionally, adjustments made as a part of “academic renewal” are not affected. Only the latest attempt is used in determining if graduation requirements are met. Certain courses are exempt from consideration as repeats and an adjustment to the GPA is not made, including but not limited to courses with course numbers 090, 190, 290, 095, 195, 295, 096, 196, 296, 097, 197, 297, 098, 198, 298, 099, 199, and 299.

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Final grades for each semester can be viewed and printed using MyREYNOLDS. Students must have their Reynolds EMPLID and password to obtain their grades. The grades of A, B, C, D, P, and S are passing grades. Grades of F and U are failing grades. R and I are interim grades. Grades of W and X are final grades carrying no credit.

Academic Renewal Students who re-enroll at Reynolds after a separation of at least sixty consecutive months may submit the “Petition for Academic Renewal” form to the Central Admissions and Records Office or to a campus Enrollment Services. If the student is found eligible, an Academic Renewal notation will be placed on the student’s permanent record and transcript. All “D” and “F” grades earned prior to the re-enrollment will appear on the record, but they will be deleted from the cumulative grade point average, subject to the following conditions: Prior to petitioning, the student must earn at least a 2.500 grade point average (using grades of “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,” and “F”) in the first twelve hours after re-enrollment. Any course credit with a grade of “D” earned prior to the reenrollment will not count toward graduation requirements. Previous diplomas, certificates, or degrees will not be rescinded in order to qualify the student. Academic Renewal adjustment will be granted only once and cannot be revoked. The granting of Academic Renewal does not affect any previous academic, financial, or administrative decisions made by Reynolds.

Academic Standing President's Honor Roll The President’s Honor Roll is awarded to curricular and noncurricular students who demonstrate the highest level of academic achievement at Reynolds. In order to receive this recognition, students must have: • • •

Earned a cumulative GPA of 3.8 or higher Earned a semester GPA of 3.5 or higher Carried at least 6 non-developmental credit hours for the semester

College Catalog 2016-2017

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES • • •

Earned 20 or more credit hours at Reynolds Earned no grades of D, F, I, or U for the semester Earned no more than 1 W for the semester

Students who earn this distinction will receive a letter and certificate during the beginning of the subsequent semester. Dean's List The Dean’s List is awarded to curricular and non-curricular students who demonstrate a high level of academic achievement at Reynolds. In order to receive this recognition, students must have: • • • •

Earned a semester GPA of 3.2 or higher Carried at least 6 non developmental credit hours for the semester Earned no grades of D, F, I or U for the semester Earned no more than 1 W for the semester

Students who earn this distinction will receive a letter and certificate during the beginning of the subsequent semester. Good Standing Students are considered to be “in good academic standing” if they maintain a minimum GPA of 2.000 each semester and are not on academic suspension or dismissal. They are eligible to reenroll at Reynolds. Academic Warning Students who fail to attain a minimum GPA of 2.000 for any semester shall be placed on academic warning. Academic Probation Students who fail to maintain a cumulative GPA of 1.500 will be on academic probation until such time as their cumulative average is 1.75 or better. The statement “Academic Probation” will be placed on the permanent record. Students on academic probation are ineligible for appointed or elected office in student organizations unless the vice president of student affairs or another appropriate administrator grants them special permission. Students usually will be required to carry less than a normal course load the following semester. Students on academic probation are required to consult with their academic advisor prior to enrollment. Students shall be placed on probation only after they have attempted 12 semester credits. Academic Suspension Students on academic probation who fail to attain a semester GPA of 1.500 will be placed on suspension only after they have attempted 24 semester credit. Academic suspension shall be for one semester. The statement “Academic Suspension” will be placed on the student’s permanent record. Students who are placed on academic suspension and wish to appeal should submit an appeal form to one of the Enrollment Services or Central Admissions and Records. Suspended students may be readmitted after termination of the suspension period without appealing for reinstatement. Upon reinstatement the student will be required to meet with an academic advisor and develop an educational plan. Students who have been reinstated from academic suspension must achieve a 2.00 GPA for the semester of their reinstatement and must earn at least a 1.75 GPA in each subsequent semester of attendance. The statement “Subject to Dismissal” shall be placed on the students’ permanent record.

College Catalog 2016-2017

Students who have been reinstated from academic suspension will remain subject to dismissal until their cumulative GPA is raised to a minimum of 1.75. Academic Dismissal Students who do not attain at least a 2.000 GPA for the semester of reinstatement following academic suspension will be academically dismissed. Students who achieve at least a 2.000 GPA for the semester of their reinstatement following academic suspension must earn at least a cumulative 1.75 GPA in each subsequent semester of enrollment. Failure to earn a 1.75 GPA in each subsequent semester until the cumulative GPA reaches 1.75 will result in academic dismissal. The statement “Academic Dismissal” will be placed on the student’s permanent record. Academic dismissal is normally permanent. In exceptional circumstances, students submit an appeal form to Enrollment Services or to Central Admissions and Records. (see Reinstatement from Suspension or Dismissal). Students who have been reinstated after academic dismissal will remain subject to dismissal until their cumulative GPA is raised to a minimum of 1.75.

Reinstatement from Suspension or Dismissal To be considered for immediate reinstatement, a suspended student must submit a Reinstatement Form or written appeal along with any documentation that helps support the request for reinstatement prior to the late registration period for the semester they wish to attend. Dismissed students that would like to be considered for reinstatement must submit the Reinstatement Form along with supporting documentation by the following deadlines: July 1 for fall reinstatement November 1 for spring reinstatement April 1 for summer reinstatement The Reinstatement Form or written appeal is forwarded to the Academic Standing Committee for consideration. Reynolds will ensure consideration of all appeals for reinstatement received by the deadline, including a review of the student’s academic history at Reynolds and documentation of mitigating circumstances. Once the appeal is received, students will be contacted regarding the appeal meeting. Students are strongly encouraged to attend the appeal meeting with the Academic Standing Committee.   Decisions to reinstate may be accompanied by conditions designed to ensure the student’s improved performance. Decisions to deny reinstatement will result in the continued enforcement of suspension or dismissal terms. Students who are not granted reinstatement will be dropped from any courses for which they may have pre-registered, and their tuition will be refunded automatically.

Advanced Standing and Transfer Credit from other Colleges

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Advanced standing is defined as the application of awarded credit, earned by means other than instruction at this institution, toward satisfying program requirements. No more than 75% of a degree or certificate may be earned through advanced standing credit. Transcripts are evaluated for curricular students only. Courses from a student’s official transcript that are equivalent and relevant to the curriculum in which he or she is enrolled will be applied towards credit in his or her program. Awarded credit is added to the student’s permanent record, but is not used for computation of the grade point average and does not carry a letter grade.

Credit by Assessment by Local Exam (ABLE)

The Central Admissions and Records Office evaluates requested advanced standing and places advanced standing, by type, on the permanent record and transcript. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that all relevant and official documents have been forwarded to the Central Admissions and Records Office. Transcripts are considered official, if they are in a sealed envelope and carry the seal of the institution or are printed on official college letterhead. Credit evaluation for courses taken at other VCCS colleges can be requested in writing; official transcripts from other VCCS colleges are not necessary.

Students interested in pursuing credit by ABLE should contact the appropriate academic program head of the curriculum.

Transfer credit awarded is available to view on the Student Information System. Official transcripts received four weeks prior to the beginning of the desired semester or term will be placed on the Student Information System prior to the final registration period. Transcripts received after that point will be evaluated as time permits and in date priority. Students should address questions regarding advanced standing with the Reynolds registrar. Credit will be awarded only for courses earning a grade of “C” or better or the equivalent. When the course contains equivalent content and credit, the course may transfer to satisfy a program requirement at this institution. This college evaluates credit for transfer from other colleges and universities, using the guidance of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers or the National Association for Foreign Student Affairs, and the Southern Association of Colleges  and Schools.

Transfer Credit from International Institutions Credit from international post-secondary institutions may be awarded upon evaluation by a private evaluation agency that is a member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (naces.org). This process pertains to both international students seeking Reynolds transfer credit and Reynolds students earning credits at foreign institutions during study-abroad experiences. The student will send official transcripts to an approved agency to obtain a course-by-course evaluation. All fees must be paid by the students directly to the evaluation agency. This evaluation is provided to Central Admissions and Records so that credit can be assigned based on the student’s chosen curriculum in accordance with established college policies.

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Credit by ABLE is available at the discretion of the academic program and is not available for all courses taught at Reynolds. Academic deans and program heads have the discretion to deny requests for credit by ABLE. In programs where CLEP/AP/IB credit are not available as a means to test to receive academic credit, credit by ABLE may be a means of earning college credit for prior learning by demonstrating satisfactory academic competency in a particular subject.

Prior Learning Activity for Credit Evaluation  This process is designed for adults who have gained collegelevel learning through work, volunteer activities, participation in civic and community assignments and similar life experiences. The process allows for students to develop portfolios, based on their experiences, to demonstrate learning equivalency to one or more college courses. Credit can only be applied if it is accepted by the faculty and after the student has successfully completed at least one course at Reynolds. Portfolio-based credit for prior experiential learning may be awarded for no more than 25 percent of the credit hours applied toward a degree. The determination of such credit must be determined by the program head and approved by the school dean.

Military Credit  Credit will be granted for military service school courses and skills if the awarding of credit is recommended in the current edition of the American Council on Education publication, a Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services, and approved by the division dean of the student’s chosen curriculum.

Credit for Occupational Experience  Credit for occupational experience may be granted for courses or programs offered by employers, professional organizations and other agencies only if those courses or programs have been evaluated by the American Council on Education (ACE). Nontraditional sources of college-equivalent learning may include a combination of formal and/or informal workplace training programs as evaluated by ACE and military training programs.

College Catalog 2016-2017

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Credit by Advanced Placement Students may receive advanced standing through the administration of the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB), advanced placement (AP) program, or the International Baccalaureate (IB) program, provided the examination scores are acceptable for credit. The required scores and appropriate credit hours awarded are listed on the following pages: CLEP Exam Title

Written Test Minimum Score for credit prior to 7/1/01

Computer Test Minimum Score for credit as of 7/1/01

Number of Credits Awarded

Reynolds/VCCS Course Equivalent

College Composition Modular

420

50

3

ENG 111

Humanities

460

50

6

Humanities Elective

College Mathematics

450

50

6

MTH 151-152

Social Sciences and History

430

50

6

Social Science or History Elective

GENERAL EXAMS

SUBJECT EXAMINATIONS COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE American Literature

46 plus essay

50

6

ENG 241-242

English Literature

46 plus essay

50

6

ENG 243-244

French • Level 1 • Level 2

39 45

50 59

8 14

FRE 101-102 FRE 101-102, 201-202

German • Level 1 • Level 2

36 42

50 60

8 14

GER 101-102 GER 101-102, 201-202

Spanish • Level 1 • Level 2

41 50

50 63

8 14

SPA 101-101 SPA 101-102, 201-202

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE American Government

47

50

3

Social Science Elective

History of United States / Early Colonization to 1877

45

50

3

HIS 121

History of United States II, 1865 to Present

45

50

3

HIS 122

Human Growth and Development

45

50

3

PSY 230

Principles of Macroeconomics

44

50

3

ECO 201

Principles of Microeconomics

41

50

3

ECO 202

Introduction to Psychology

47

50

3

PSY 200

Introduction to 47 Sociology – Comparative

50

3

SOC 200

College Catalog 2016-2017

49

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Western Civilization / Ancient Near East to 1648

46

50

3

HIS 101

Western Civilization II 1648 to the Present

47

50

3

HIS 102

SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS Biology

 

50

8

BIO 101-102

Chemistry

 

50

8

CHM 111-112

Natural Sciences

 

50

8

BIO 141-142

College Algebra

 

50

3

MTH 163

Precalculus

 

50

5

MTH 166

Calculus

 

50

5

MTH 173

 Some four-year institutions do not allow transferred CLEP credits to satisfy degree requirements. If planning to transfer to a college or university, contact its Admissions office to find out how it uses CLEP credits.   AP Exam Title

Minimum Score for Credit

# of Credits Awarded

Reynolds/VCCS Course Equivalent

Art History

3

6

ART 101-102 History and Appreciation of Art I-II, 3 credits each

Art, Studio: Drawing

3

4

ART 121 Drawing I, 4 credits

Art Studio: 3D Design

3

4

ART 131 Fundamentals of Design I, 4 credits

Music Theory

3

4

MUS 111

General Biology

4

8

BIO 101-102

Chemistry

4

8

CHM 111-112

Computer Science A

4

4

CSC 201

Calculus AB

3

5

MTH 173

Calculus BC

3

10

MTH 173-174

Physics B

4

8

PHY 201-202

Physics C Mechanics

N/A

0

There is none. This is not equivalent to PHY 241 University Physics

Physics C Electricity and Magnetism

N/A

0

This is not equivalent to PHY 242 University Physics

Statistics

3

3

MTH 240

English, Language & Composition

3

3

ENG 111

English, Literature & Composition

3

3

ENG 111

French, Language

3 4 5

8 11 14

FRE 101-102 FRE 101-102-201 FRE 101-102-201-202

THE ARTS

THE SCIENCES

LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE

50

College Catalog 2016-2017

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES German, Language

3 4 5

8 11 14

GER 101-102 GER 101-102-201 GER 101-102-201-202

Spanish, Language

3 4 5

8 11 14

SPA 101-102 SPA 101-102-201 SPA 101-102-201-202

Spanish, Literature

3

3

SPA 233

Human Geography

3

3

GEO 210

United States Government and Politics

3

3

PLS 211

Comparative Government and Politics

3

3

Social Science Elective

History, United States

3

6

HIS 121-122

History, European

3

6

HIS Elective

Economics, Macro

3

3

ECO 201

Economics, Micro

3

3

ECO 202

Psychology

3

3

PSY 200

World History

3

6

History Electives

SOCIAL SCIENCES

All Virginia community colleges shall accept a score of three (3) and higher for Advanced Placement (AP) courses, however, students are encouraged to check required scores for transferability to four-year institutions. The amount of credit awarded for each examination will be consistent with the Reynolds College Board recommendation.   International Baccalaureate Exam Title

Minimum Score for Credit

# of Credits Awarded

Reynolds/VCCS Course Equivalent

Art Design HL

5,6,7

4 8

ART 131 – Fundamentals of Design ART 131-132 –Fundamentals of Design I and II

English A1

5,6,7

3 6

ENG 111 – College Composition I ENG 111-112 – College Composition I and II

English B

5,6,7

3

ENG 111 – College Composition I

French Language HL

5,6,7

12

FRE 101, 102, 201, 202

German Language HL

5,6,7

12

GER 101, 102, 201, 202

History: Americas HL

5,6,7

6

HIS 121–122 – United States History I-II

History: Africa HL

5,6,7

3

HIS 203 – History of African Civilization

History: Europe HL

5,6,7

6

HIS 101-102 – History of Western Civilization I-II

Philosophy HL

5,6,7

3

PHI 101 – Introduction to Philosophy

Spanish HL

5,6,7

12

SPA 101, 102, 201, 202

Theory of Knowledge

A,B,C

3

PHI 101 – Introduction to Philosophy

ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

College Catalog 2016-2017

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCES Biology HL

5,6,7

4 4 8

BIO 106 - Life Science BIO 101 - General Biology I BIO 101-102 - General Biology III

Chemistry HL

5,6,7

4 8

CHM 111 - College Chemistry I CHM 111-112 - College Chemistry I-II

Physics HL

5,6,7

4 8

PHY 201 -General College Physics PHY 201-202 - General College Physics 201-202

Mathematics HL

5,6,7

3 5 10

MTH 163 – Precalculus MTH 173 – Calculus/Analytic Geo. I MTH 173-174 - Calculus/Analytic Geo. I-II

Mathematical Studies

5,6,7

3

MTH 163 - Precalculus

Computer Science HL

5,6,7

4 8

CSC 201 CSC 201-202

Graduation and Program Requirements Graduation Honors Students who have fulfilled the requirements of degree or certificate programs (with the exception of career studies certificates) are eligible for graduation honors. The honors based upon scholastic achievement are as follows: *Graduating GPA Honor   3.200 Cum laude (with honor) 3.500 Magna cum laude (with high honor) 3.800 Summa cum laude (with highest honor) NOTE: The cumulative GPA is used to determine graduation honors.

Graduation Requirements and Procedures 1. A curricular student eligible for graduation is required to complete the graduation application through the Student Information System for each degree and certificate they are completing by the deadline for that semester or term. • • •

Fall 2016 graduation application deadline - September 30, 2016 Spring 2017 graduation application deadline - January 31, 2017 Summer 2017 graduation application deadline - June 30, 2017

2. If a student files for graduation but does not graduate, he or she must submit another graduation application for a subsequent term. Students may graduate after fall, spring, or summer terms. See section on “Commencement.” 3. The student must complete all program requirements as specified in their catalog, including curricular admission requirements.

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4. The student must earn a grade point average of at least 2.000 in the curriculum. 5. The student must fulfill all of the course and credit-hour requirements of the curriculum with at least 25% of credit semester hours earned at Reynolds Community College. 6. The student must submit all documentation of training, education, or tests from organizations outside of Reynolds to the Central Admissions and Records Office by the last day of classes in their final semester. All Reynolds courses must also be completed by the last day of classes in their final semester. Incomplete “I” grades must be completed by this time in order to be used for graduation. 7. The school dean for the curriculum must recommend the student for graduation, and the registrar must certify completion of all graduation requirements. 8. The student must resolve all financial obligations with Reynolds and must return all library and college materials. Commencement Reynolds has one formal commencement ceremony each year, which occurs after the spring semester for students completing certificate or associate degree curricula throughout the academic year. A student is not permitted to participate in a commencement ceremony prior to the completion of the program of study. Students who graduate in the summer or fall will be invited to participate in the next spring commencement ceremony. Program Requirements The catalog that will be used to review a student’s progress toward completion of program requirements and certification for graduation will be the catalog in effect at the time of the student’s initial matriculation into the program or any subsequent

College Catalog 2016-2017

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES catalog in effect during the time of the student’s enrollment in the program, to be chosen by the student, provided that: A. The student has not been discontinued, as a result of breaks in enrollment. Otherwise the catalog in effect at the time of their return will become the effective catalog; and, B. The catalog is no more than seven years old at the time of graduation. Otherwise either the current catalog or any catalog that is no more than seven years old becomes the effective catalog. The catalog year to be used should be chosen by the student in consultation with the program head/curricular advisor, with the program head having the final determination of appropriate catalog year. Wherever possible, substitutions will be utilized to maximize the usage of previously-taken courses while maintaining the integrity of the degree. Associate Degree To be awarded an associate degree from Reynolds, a student must have fulfilled all course requirements of the curriculum as outlined in the Reynolds Catalog with a minimum of 25% of the credits earned at Reynolds. Certificate To be eligible for graduation with a certificate or career studies certificate from Reynolds, a student must have fulfilled all course requirements of the curriculum as outlined in the Reynolds Catalog with a minimum of 25% of the credits earned at Reynolds. Second Degree Or Certificate Reynolds may grant credit for all completed applicable courses which are requirements of the additional degree, diploma, certificate, or career studies certificate. However, the awards must differ from one another by at least 25% of the credits.

Change of Curriculum (Program/Plan)

It is the student’s responsibility to keep this information upto-date with the Central Admissions and Records Office. Timely reporting of name and address changes will assist Reynolds in ensuring proper delivery of important notices and announcements. Students can submit address changes through the Student Information System (SIS) or by visiting a campus Enrollment Services or the Central Admissions and Records Office.  Email Communication Electronic mail or “email” is an official method for communication at Reynolds. All official email communication will be distributed to VCCS email accounts only. Reynolds will utilize the VCCS email to communicate important information to students. Students should check the student email regularly. Transcripts A transcript is a copy of the student’s permanent academic record at Reynolds. An official transcript carries the Reynolds seal and is mailed to other educational institutions and agencies. Written requests for transcripts must be delivered, mailed, or sent by fax to any campus Enrollment Services or to the Central Admissions and Records Office, where the transcripts will generally be produced within two weeks. Reynolds policy does not allow email transmission of transcript requests because a signature is required. Transcripts will not be mailed until all obligations to the business office, bookstore, or library have been paid in full. Students may produce an unofficial transcript on Reynolds Online, or they may request a copy in Enrollment Services. Enrollment Verification and Certifications for Loan Deferment At the written request of the student, the Admissions and Records Office will produce official verification of enrollment. These are typically required as documentation to continue the student’s eligibility for dependent services, benefits, and insurance external to Reynolds.

Students who desire to change programs must consult with a faculty advisor or advising specialist in Enrollment Services. The Central Admissions and Records Office will process the request, provided all applicable admission requirements for the new program have been satisfied. Program/plan changes are effective for subsequent semesters in most cases. Students should be aware that program/plan changes effect the catalog year of their respective program. Students will follow the curricular requirements based upon the effective date of the plan change.

Students wishing to defer repayment of certain loans should submit the appropriate forms from the lending agency to any campus Enrollment Services or to the Central Admissions and Records Office. Reynolds will transmit the student’s enrollment data to the National Student Loan Clearinghouse for distribution to the appropriate lending agency. Official and final enrollment verification as well as loan deferment certifications will be processed after the deadline to drop with a refund for any particular semester or term.

Waiver and Substitution of Course Requirements

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

Students may petition the appropriate school dean for the waiver of required courses in the curriculum. If required courses are waived, other courses must be substituted in the curriculum to meet the specified credit hour requirement. No credit is granted for the waived courses.

Student Records Mailing Address

College Catalog 2016-2017

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) offers students certain rights with respect of their education records. They are: 1. The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day Reynolds receives a request for access. Students should submit written requests to the Central Admission & Records Office, Parham Road Campus, Georgiadis Hall, Room 351. The request must identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Records office staff will make arrangements for access and

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. 2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes to be inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask Reynolds Community College to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the Reynolds official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If Reynolds decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, Reynolds will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

Notice Regarding Directory Information FERPA designates certain information as “directory information,” which may be released upon request without the student’s expressed written consent. It is the policy of Reynolds Community College not to publish a student directory. However, name, address, telephone number, major field of study, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and term course load can be released upon request unless a student notifies the Admissions and Records Office either in writing or through the Student Information System.

3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by Reynolds or the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff). Other typical exceptions include: • • • • • • • • • • • •



Other schools to which a student is transferring; High schools of dual or concurrent enrollment students; Specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes; Appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student; Organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the school; Accrediting organizations; To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena; Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, and pursuant to specific State law; A person or company with whom Reynolds or VCCS has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); A person serving on the Reynolds College Board or Foundation Board; A student serving on an official college committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks, excluding student government/leadership organization tasks; and A school official with a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.

The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Reynolds to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA are: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 600 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605

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College Catalog 2016-2017

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Student Policies & Procedures

College Catalog 2016-2017

55

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE   Visit reynolds.edu/student_services/policies for the most recent version of each policy.

Student Rights and Responsibilities This statement of rights and responsibilities is designed to clarify those rights, which the student may expect to enjoy as a member of the student body of a community college and the obligations which admission to Reynolds places upon the student. The submission of an application for admission to a community college represents a voluntary decision on the part of the prospective student to participate in the programs offered by the institution pursuant to the policies, rules, and regulations of the community colleges and rules and regulations of the State Board of Community Colleges. In turn, college approval of that application represents the extension of a privilege to join the college community and to remain a part of it so long as the student meets the required academic and behavior standards of the college system. • Each individual student is guaranteed the privileges of exercising his/her rights without fear or prejudice. Such rights include the following: • Students are free to pursue their educational goals; appropriate opportunities for learning in the classroom and on the campus shall be provided by Reynolds or curricula offered by Reynolds.  • No disciplinary sanctions may be imposed upon any student without due process.  • Free inquiry, expression, and assembly are guaranteed to all students provided their actions do not interfere with the rights of others or the effective operation of the institution.  • Academic evaluation of student performance shall be neither arbitrary nor capricious.  • Reynolds and members of the college community have the right to expect safety, protection of property and the continuity of the educational process.  • Upon written request to the Director of Admissions and Records, a student will be permitted to inspect and review his/ her permanent educational record within forty-five (45) days following the date on which the request.

Student Complaint Reynolds is committed to providing an exceptional educational experience through the delivery of high-quality programs and services. As such, Reynolds strives to create an open environment where students may provide feedback regarding the quality of services or the environment. In instances where a student may be dissatisfied with services or conditions of the environment, he or she has the right to lodge concerns related to service, instruction, or the environment at Reynolds. This written complaint must be submitted to the Office of Student Affairs where it will be sent to the manager of the area of concern for follow up with the student. Policy 1-4 (Student Complaint Policy) in its entirety can be found in the Office of Student Affairs and online at reynolds.edu/ student_services/policies.

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Student Grievance Students have the right and opportunity to air any grievances (academic and non-academic) they may have with a faculty or staff member. Students are first encouraged to speak directly with the faculty or staff member to determine an appropriate resolution. If the problem is not resolved between the student and the individual, the student is encouraged to contact the Office of Student Affairs room 350, Georgiadis Hall, Parham Road Campus, (804) 523-5296), who will review Policy 1-12 (Student Appeal of Academic and/or Administrative Decisions) with the student.  Policy 1-12 (Student Appeal of Academic and/or Administrative Decisions) in its entirety can be found in the Office of Student Affairs and online at reynolds.edu/student_services/policies.

Student Advocacy In the design and improvement of programs, courses and services, Reynolds constantly focuses upon student needs. Students and staff members are encouraged to advocate student interest pertaining to any issue or problem confronting the college community. Students may voice their interest through the Office of Student Affairs, Office of Student Life and through participation on various college-wide standing committees. Particular responsibility for identifying and supporting student needs and interests, with respect to college operations and procedures, lies with the Division of Student Affairs and the Student Affairs Policy Committee.

Student Conduct  Reynolds holds its students to the highest standards of academic and social behavior. In the instance where a student commits a disruptive act either inside or outside of the classroom, that student may be subject to disciplinary action by the Office of Student Affairs. Faculty, staff, or other students may file a report against a student if he or she has witnessed an offense. The Office of Student Affairs will oversee the administration of all conduct cases in accordance with the Student Conduct Policy 1-35.  Jurisdiction of the student conduct policy extends to any student who is enrolled in a course sponsored by the institution, as well as any incident involving a Reynolds student that occurs off campus at college leased or owned facilities, or attending activities that are sponsored, initiated, authorized, or supervised by Reynolds. Depending on the nature of the incident, students may be processed by the Reynolds Department of Police for violation of local, state or federal laws. Policy 1-35 in its entirety can be found in the Office of Student Affairs and online at reynolds.edu/ student_services/policies.

Academic Honesty Reynolds subscribes to the notion of academic honesty and integrity as it relates to students’ behavior within the classroom or with assignments and examinations. 

College Catalog 2016-2017

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Reynolds Policy 1-34, Academic Honesty, outlines those behaviors that are unacceptable at the institution, as well as procedures used to address those behaviors. Any student who is found to have violated the policy will be subject to disciplinary action which could result in sanctions from a failing grade on the assignment to expulsion from the institution.

In addition to the placement testing required of all entering curricular students and all non-curricular students registering for English, mathematics, and certain other courses, Reynolds systematically evaluates the effectiveness of teaching and learning, academic and administrative support services, and cocurricular activities in meeting student needs.

Policy 1-34 in its entirety can be found in the Office of Student Affairs and online at reynolds.edu/student_services/policies.

Students may be requested to participate in one or more assessment activities appropriate to their fields of study during their academic course work at Reynolds. The results of such assessment activities shall be confidential and shall be used by Reynolds for the purpose of evaluating and improving the effectiveness of Reynolds academic programs and services to maximize student success.

Student Sexual Misconduct Reynolds is an educational institution that strives to provide students and other members of the community with an academic learning environment that is free from sexual misconduct or gender-based discrimination, In compliance with this commitment, Reynolds has established Policy 1-14 (Student Sexual Misconduct). Policy 1-14 states Reynolds will not tolerate sexual misconduct which may be inclusive of sexual harassment, nonconsensual sexual intercourse, nonconsensual sexual contact, or sexual exploitation. Reynolds considers these types of behaviors serious threats to the integrity of the community and will pursue all charges. Moreover, certain acts may be criminal, and as such, subject to both criminal and civil legal actions. Students who violate this policy will have college charges processed against them in the normal manner of due process provided by college rules. A person who believes that he/she may have experienced sexual misconduct, but are uncertain as to whether a complaint is justified or whether they wish to initiate a formal complaint, may find it helpful to discuss their concerns confidentially and informally with the vice president of student affairs (VPSA), or designee in the Office of Student Affairs (will be moving from 350 Georgiadis Hall to 204 Georgiadis Hall during the spring of 2016), Parham Road Campus, (804) 523-5296. Policy 1-14 in its entirety can be found in the Office of Student Affairs and online at reynolds.edu/student_services/policies.

Substance Abuse  Reynolds maintains an environment that aims to protect the health, safety and welfare of its students, faculty and staff by enforcing a drug-free environment. In compliance with this commitment and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, Reynolds recognizes any unlawful use, possession, manufacture, sale, or distribution of any illegal or controlled substance, including alcoholic beverages, as a violation of policy 1-35 (Student Conduct). Disciplinary action, as outlined in Policy 1-35, will be taken against any student who is found in violation of substance abuse on campus, off campus at college leased or owned facilities, or attending activities that are sponsored, initiated, authorized, or supervised by Reynolds. Policy 1-35 (Student Conduct) in its entirety can be found in the Office of Student Affairs and online at reynolds.edu/student_services/ policies.

Student Assessment

College Catalog 2016-2017

Reynolds Community College, Virginia Community College System, Information Technology Student/Patron Acceptable Use Agreement Thousands of users share the VCCS and Reynolds computing resources. Everyone must use these resources responsibly since misuse by even a few individuals has the potential to disrupt business or the educational work of others. Therefore students, faculty and staff must exercise ethical behavior when using these information resources, and agree to abide by information technology acceptable use. As a user of the Virginia Community College System's local and shared computer systems, I understand and agree to abide by the following acceptable use agreement terms. These terms govern my access to and use of the information technology applications, services, and resources of the VCCS and the information they generate. The VCCS has granted access to me as a necessary privilege in order to perform authorized functions at the college where I am currently enrolled. I will not knowingly permit use of my entrusted access control mechanism for any purposes other than those required to perform authorized functions related to my status as a student. These include logon identification, password, workstation identification, user identification, digital certificates, or two-factor authentication mechanisms. I will not disclose information concerning any access control mechanism unless properly authorized to do so by my enrolling college. I will not use any access mechanism that the VCCS has not expressly assigned to me. I will treat all information maintained on the college computer systems as strictly confidential and will not release information to any unauthorized person. I agree to abide by all applicable state, federal, VCCS, and college policies, procedures and standards that relate to the VCCS Information Security Standard, the VCCS Information Technology Student/Patron Acceptable Use Agreement, and JSRCC Policy No: 4-32, Use of Computer and Information Technology Resources. Inappropriate use of college computer resources includes, but is not limited to the following:

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE • • • • • • • •

• • •

Attempting to gain access to information owned by the college or by its authorized users without the permission of the owners of that information; Accessing, downloading, printing, or storing information with sexually explicit content as prohibited by law or policy; Downloading or transmitting fraudulent, threatening, obscene, intimidating, defamatory, harassing, discriminatory, or otherwise unlawful messages or images; Installing or downloading computer software, programs, or executable files contrary to policy; Uploading or downloading copyrighted materials or proprietary agency information contrary to policy; Sending e-mail using another’s identity, an assumed name, or anonymously; Attempting to intercept or read messages not intended for them; Intentionally developing or experimenting with malicious programs (viruses, worms, spy-ware, keystroke loggers, phishing software, Trojan horses, etc.) on any collegeowned computer; Knowingly propagating malicious programs; Changing administrator rights on any college-owned computer, or the equivalent on non-Microsoft Windows based systems; Using college computing resources to support any commercial venture or for personal financial gain.

Students must follow any special rules that are posted or communicated to them by responsible staff members, whenever they use college computing laboratories, classrooms, and computers in the Library. They shall do nothing intentionally that degrades or disrupts the computer systems or interferes with systems and equipment that support the work of others. Problems with college computing resources should be reported to the staff in charge or the Information Technology Help Desk.

perform or display it. A student must either have an express or implied license to use copyrighted material or data, or be able to prove fair use. Students and other users of college computers are responsible for understanding how copyright law applies to their electronic transactions. They may not violate the copyright protection of any information, software, or data with which they come into contact through the college computing resources. Downloading or distributing copyrighted materials such as documents, movies, music, etc. without the permission of the rightful owner may be considered copyright infringement, which is illegal under federal and state copyright law. Use of the college’s network resources to commit acts of copyright infringement may be subject to prosecution and disciplinary action. The penalties for infringing copyright law can be found under the U.S. Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. §§ 501-518 (http:// www.copyright.gov/title 17/92chap5.html) and in the U.S. Copyright Office’s summary of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (http://www.copyright.gov/legislation/dmca.pdf). I understand that it is my responsibility to read and abide by this agreement, even if I do not agree with it. If I have any questions about the VCCS Information Technology Acceptable Use Agreement, I understand that I need to contact the college Information Security Officer or appropriate college official. By acknowledging this agreement, I hereby certify that I understand the preceding terms and provisions and that I accept the responsibility of adhering to the same. I further acknowledge that should I violate this agreement, I will be subject to disciplinary action.

If I observe any incidents of non-compliance with the terms of this agreement, I am responsible for reporting them to the Information Security Officer and/or management of my college. I understand that I must use only those computer resources that I have the authority to use. I must not provide false or misleading information to gain access to computing resources. The VCCS may regard these actions as criminal acts and may treat them accordingly. I must not use VCCS IT resources to gain unauthorized access to computing resources of other institutions, organizations, individuals, etc. The System Office and colleges reserve the right (with or without cause) to monitor, access and disclose all data created, sent, received, processed, or stored on VCCS systems to ensure compliance with VCCS policies and federal, state, or local regulations. College or System Office officials will have the right to review and/or confiscate (as needed) any equipment (COV owned or personal) connected to a COV owned device or network. Computer software, databases, and electronic documents are protected by copyright law. A copyright is a work of authorship in a tangible medium. Copyright owners have the sole right to reproduce their work, prepare derivatives or adaptations of it, distribute it by sale, rent, license lease, or lending and/or to

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College Catalog 2016-2017

PROGRAM INFORMATION

PROGRAM INFORMATION College Transfer Programs 60 University Parallel Study 60 State Policy on Transfer from Community Colleges to Senior Institutions 60 Transfer Agreements 60 Occupational and Technical Programs 61 Career Studies Programs 61 Computer Competency Requirement for Students 61 Academic Program Directory A-Z 62

College Catalog 2016-2017

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE  

College Transfer Programs Award — Associate of Science (AS) Associate of Arts (AA) Reynolds transfer programs include freshman- and sophomorelevel courses in arts and sciences and pre-professional education, meeting standards acceptable for transfer to bachelor’s degree programs in four-year colleges and universities. These programs are specifically designed for transfer at the junior level.

University Parallel Study Reynolds offers programs leading to the associate of arts (AA) degree or the associate of science (AS) degree. Commonly referred to as college transfer or university parallel study, these programs are designed for students who plan to complete the freshman and sophomore years of college work at Reynolds and then transfer to universities and four-year colleges of their choice. Each university has different requirements for baccalaureate programs. Reynolds advisors and specialists in the Career, Employment and Transfer Centers will assist students in the selection of the curriculum of study most applicable to their baccalaureate plans. Earned credits in the program are generally transferable to the senior college or university and applicable toward a bachelor’s degree. Students should work with their academic advisors and transfer specialists to select their courses to match the requirements of the transfer institution. Reynolds has articulation agreements for specific academic programs with several Virginia universities and colleges. Such agreements guarantee that the student with the associate degree has complete transferability of all credits. A student transferring prior to the receipt of the associate of arts or associate of science degree is not assured of such status. Advisors and transfer specialists can provide information about articulation agreements. Reynolds offers the following specific programs of study leading to the associate of arts or associate of science degrees:  Associate of Arts Degree Liberal Arts     Teacher Preparation Specialization Associate of Science Degree Business Administration Engineering     Mechanical/General Engineering Specialization     Chemical/Biological Engineering Specialization     Electrical/Computer Engineering Specialization Science     Computer Science Specialization     Mathematics Specialization      Science Specialization     Mathematics and Science Teacher Preparation Specialization Social Sciences     American Sign Language/Deaf Studies Specialization     Pre-Social Work Specialization     Teacher Preparation Specialization

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The foundation courses are available (through the associate of arts or associate of science degrees) for advanced professional degree programs in the following fields: Dentistry Law Medicine Optometry Pharmacy Veterinary Medicine Reynolds also offers two-year programs that lead to the associate of applied science (AAS) degree. These occupational/technical programs are specifically designed to prepare students for immediate employment. Some four-year colleges and universities have accepted courses into their program counterparts from AAS degree programs that are not designed for transfer purposes. It is the responsibility of the four-year institution to determine and publish its policies on the admission of transfer students and the criteria for determining the acceptability of transfer credits completed at another institution. Additional general education courses may be required to transfer with junior status from AAS degree programs. Students should work closely with their academic advisors and the transfer specialists to select courses that match requirements of the transfer institution.

State Policy on Transfer from Community Colleges to Senior Institutions Virginia’s system of public colleges and universities has extended higher education throughout the Commonwealth from Eastern Shore to Big Stone Gap and from Fairfax to Southside. The system gives students ready access to college and enables them to choose from among many two- and four-year institutions. Ideally, students should be able to move through Virginia’s public education system as if it were a continuum, rather than a system of distinct levels or separate stages. The State Board for Community Colleges and the Council of Higher Education for Virginia have endorsed a coherent statewide policy to facilitate transfer between state-supported community colleges and senior colleges and universities. This policy requires commitment by both community colleges and senior institutions to common goals on behalf of students and education.**NOTES from State Policy on Transfer, VCCS/SCHEV.

Transfer Agreements Reynolds has agreements with many senior institutions covering the conditions for student transfer from Reynolds to a baccalaureate program at the four-year college or university. Many of the agreements guarantee admission. These formal arrangements are referred to as transfer agreements. The arrangements fall into two categories—the master transfer agreement, which provides general guarantees to transferring students, and the program-specific articulation agreement covering the conditions for the transfer into a particular curriculum. Students transferring prior to the receipt of the associate of arts or associate of science degree are not covered under these articulation agreements. Advisors and transfer specialists can provide information about these agreements.

College Catalog 2016-2017

PROGRAM INFORMATION Reynolds has current agreements, as a result of either direct negotiations between Reynolds and the transfer institution or the creation of a system-wide agreement between the Virginia Community College System and the transfer institution. Bellevue University Bluefield College Bluefield College-Nursing Christopher Newport University College of William and Mary College of William and Mary (Co-Enrollment Agreement) ECPI University ECPI-Nursing Emory & Henry College  Ferrum College  George Mason University George Washington University-Nursing George Washington University-Medicine and Health Sciences Hollins University  James Madison University-Guaranteed Admission Agreement Jefferson College of Heath Sciences Johnson and Wales Liberty University  Longwood University-Business AS Degree Longwood University-Guaranteed Admission Agreement Lynchburg College-Guaranteed Admission Agreement Lynchburg College-Nursing Mary Baldwin College Norfolk State University Old Dominion University Radford University-Guaranteed Admission Agreement Radford University-Nursing Randolph College Randolph-Macon College Regent University Regis University Shenandoah University  St. Leo University Strayer University Troy University  University of Mary Washington University of Richmond, School of Professional & Continuing Studies University of Virginia-Guaranteed Admission Agreement University of Virginia-Engineering University of Virginia-Nursing University of Virginia, School of Continuing and Professional Studies-Respiratory Therapy University of Virginia’s College at Wise Virginia Commonwealth University-Guaranteed Admission Agreement Virginia Commonwealth University-Business Administration Virginia Commonwealth University-Engineering and Computer Science Virginia Commonwealth University-Teacher Preparation Virginia Commonwealth University-Medical Laboratory Technology Virginia Commonwealth University-Nursing Virginia Commonwealth University-Social Work Virginia State University-Guaranteed Admission Agreement Virginia State University-Business Administration AS

College Catalog 2016-2017

Virginia Tech-Guaranteed Admission Agreement Virginia Tech, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Virginia Tech, College of Engineering Virginia Union University Virginia Wesleyan College Western Governors University-Online Nursing For the most current list of transfer agreements, visit reynolds.edu/gta. 

Occupational and Technical Programs  Award —Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Certificate  The occupational and technical education programs are designed to prepare students for employment as technicians, paraprofessionals, and skilled craftspersons. The associate of applied science degree is awarded for completion of two-year programs. The certificate is awarded for completion of a program less than two years in length, generally two or three semesters.

Career Studies Programs Award — Certificate Career studies certificates can be completed in a shorter period of time than other certificate programs. These programs provide opportunities for upgrading occupational or technical skills, retraining for a career change, and investigating new career possibilities.

Computer Competency Requirement for Students  Reynolds emphasizes the importance of computer competency for all students who are enrolled in a college program that requires a minimum of 30 credits for graduation. Programs with 30 or more credits provide for the computer competency of students in one of three ways:  1. including a computer competency course - ITE 115 or CSC 155 in the curriculum, 2. requiring that students in the curriculum pass the Reynolds computer competency exam, or 3. including a course or courses that meet or exceed the computer competency requirements as a part of the curriculum. Students should consult the catalog description of their program to determine the computer competency requirement. Students in programs that require ITE 115 or CSC 155 can satisfy the computer competency course requirement in the curriculum by passing the Reynolds computer competency exam administered in the testing centers on each campus. Because CSC 155 includes content that is not covered in ITE 115, students seeking college credit for CSC 155 will take a different

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE version of the computer competency exam. Those students who successfully pass the computer competency exam will receive college credit for either ITE 115 or CSC 155, without enrolling in the course, depending on the version of the exam taken. Any student not passing the computer competency exam will do one of the following based on the results of the test: 1. successfully complete ITE 115 or CSC 155 or 2. learn the competencies the student is lacking through self-study or any other method that will enable the student to learn the competencies and then retake the computer competency exam. Students will be allowed to retake the computer competency exam only once. Upon retaking the computer competency exam, students who do not pass the exam must complete either ITE 115 or CSC 155. A computer competent student at Reynolds will be able to: • • • •

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demonstrate a working knowledge of computing concepts, components, and operations to accomplish educational and career tasks. use appropriate components of an integrated productivity software package involving word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation, and/or communication applications; access, retrieve, and apply networked information resources, e.g., online catalog, virtual libraries, the Internet and World Wide Web; and use telecommunication software, e.g., electronic mail, listservs, bulletin boards, and/or newsgroups, to communicate with faculty, students, and information providers.

College Catalog 2016-2017

PROGRAM INFORMATION Academic Program Directory A-Z The following table shows the respective plan’s contact number for each campus location as appropriate. In the campus location columns, COMPLETE indicates that the plan’s certificate or degree can be completed at that campus. COURSES indicates that one or more courses for the plan are offered at that campus. The DISTANCE campus location indicates Distance Learning courses. These are typically administered online, but some courses may require proctored exams, on-campus labs, clinicals, or other special on-campus meetings. For information on Distance Learning, visit reynolds.edu/cde or call the Center for Distance Learning at (804) 523-5612 or (800) 711-1628 (Virginia only). Certificates or degrees shown with an asterisk ( * ) on the following pages indicate transfer degree and certificate programs.

The following footnote references are used in the table. 1

A majority of the courses in the American Sign Language–English Interpretation program are offered only via distance learning.

2

All courses in this program may be completed at the Goochland Campus except for the social/behavioral science and humanities/ fine arts electives, which may be completed at the Downtown Campus, Parham Road Campus, or via distance learning. 3

All courses in the Culinary Arts AAS degree may be completed at the Downtown Campus except HRI 119, which is offered only via distance learning. 4

Completion of the courses in the EMS - Paramedic AAS degree requires that most EMS courses be taken at local fire/EMS training centers. 5

All courses in this program must be completed at local fire/EMS training centers.

6

Completion of the Hospitality Management AAS degree requires that courses be taken both at the Downtown Campus and via distance learning. 7

All courses in this program can be completed online except for the seminar and project course.

8

All courses in the Legal Office Technology CSC may be completed at the Parham Road Campus with the exception of AST 243, which is offered only via distance learning. 9

All courses in the Management AAS, Retail Specialization, may be completed at the Parham Road Campus with the exception of MKT 220 and MKT 271, which are offered only via distance learning. 10

All courses in the Management AAS, Small Business Specialization, may be completed at the Parham Road Campus with the exception of BUS 260, which is offered only via distance learning. 11

All courses in this program are offered via distance learning with the exception of labs and clinicals, which must be completed at an approved site. 12

All courses in this program are offered via distance learning. Apprentice students are also required to complete 2,000 hours of onthe-job training per year, for a total of 6,000 hours. 13

Completion of the Substance Abuse Counseling Education Career Studies Certificate requires that some courses be taken via distance learning. 14

This program is also offered through the Weekend College.

  Campus Location

Plans

Certificate or Degree

DTC

PRC

GC

DL

B 203

Accounting

AAS

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Courses

Courses

Courses

B 202

Accounting

C

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Courses

Courses

Courses

B Accounting 221-203-02 

CSC

 

523-5301 Complete 

 

Courses 

B 400-01

Administration of Justice

AAS

Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

N&AH 221-152-07

Advanced Medical Coder (Health Information Management)

CSC

523-5375 Courses

Courses

 

Complete

CSC

523-5178 Courses

Courses

Courses

Courses

AAS

523-5178 Courses

Courses

Courses

Courses

School/ Plan Code

H&SS American Sign Language 221-640-01 H&SS 640

American Sign Language – English Interpretation

 

Architectural and Engineering Technology

College Catalog 2016-2017

1

63

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE B 895-01

Contemporary Technology for Design Specialization

AAS

Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

B 895-02

Building Construction Management Specialization

AAS

Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

B 895-04

Geospatial and Environmental Engineering Technologies Specialization

AAS

Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

B Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair 221-909-01 

CSC

 

 

523-5432 Complete 

 

B 909

Automotive Technology

AAS

Courses

Courses

523-5432 Courses

Courses

B 902

Automotive Technology

C

Courses

Courses

523-5432 Complete

Courses

B 213

Business Administration*

AS

523-5177 Complete

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Complete

B 221-729-01

Computer-Aided Design Specialist

CSC

Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

CSC

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Complete

2

B Criminal Justice 221-400-45  

Culinary Arts

B 242-01

Culinary Arts Specialization

AAS

523-5781 Courses

Courses

Courses

Courses

B 242-02

Pastry Arts Specialization

AAS

523-5781 Courses

Courses

Courses

Courses

B 242-03

Culinary Management Specialization

AAS

523-5781 Courses

Courses

Courses

Courses

N&AH 120

Dental Assisting

C

523-5380 Complete

Courses

Courses

Courses

N&AH 117

Dental Laboratory Technology

AAS

523-5931 Complete

Courses

Courses

Courses

N&AH 221-117-02

Dental Laboratory Technology

CSC

523-5931 Complete

Courses

Courses

Courses

B 920

Diesel Mechanics Technology

C

Courses

Courses

523-5432 Complete

Courses

H&SS 636

Early Childhood Development

AAS

523-5178 Courses

Courses

Courses

Complete

H&SS 632

Early Childhood Development

C

523-5178 Courses

Courses

Courses

Complete

H&SS Early Childhood Education 221-636-06

CSC

523-5178 Complete

Courses

Courses

Complete

H&SS Early Childhood Education – Advanced 221-636-08

CSC

523-5178 Courses

Courses

 

Complete

H&SS Early Childhood School-Age Child Care 221-636-07

CSC

523-5178 Courses

Courses

Courses

Courses

B 221-251-01

eCommerce

CSC

Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

N&AH 146

Emergency Medical Services – Paramedic

AAS

523-5768 Courses

Courses

Courses

Courses

N&AH 221-146-01

Emergency Medical Services – Emergency Medical Technician

CSC

523-5768 Complete

Complete

Courses

Courses

N&AH

Emergency Medical Services – Intermediate

CSC

523-5768

 

 

 

64

3

4

5

College Catalog 2016-2017

PROGRAM INFORMATION 221-146-03

See footnote #5

5 N&AH Emergency Medical Services – Paramedic 221-146-05

CSC

523-5768 See footnote #5

 

 

Courses

 

Engineering

MS&E 831-04

Chemical/Biological Engineering Specialization*

AS

523-5374 Courses

523-5225 Complete

Courses

Courses

MS&E  831-03

Electrical/Computer Engineering Specialization*

AS

523-5374  Courses

523-5225  Complete

Courses

Courses

MS&E  831-01

Mechanical/General Engineering Specialization*

AS

523-5374  Courses

523-5225  Complete

Courses

Courses

B 221-212-10

Entrepreneurship in Small Business

CSC

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Complete

B 427-01

Fire Science Technology

AAS

Courses

523-5518 Complete

Courses

Courses

B 427-03

Emergency Services Leadership Specialization

 AAS

Courses 

523-5518  Complete 

Courses 

Courses 

B 428

Fire Science Technology

C

Courses

523-5518 Complete

Courses

Courses

CSC

Courses

Courses

523-5432 Complete

Courses

B Floral Design 221-335-02 H&SS 695

General Education*,

C

523-5178 Complete

523-5263 Complete

Courses

Complete

B 221-719-71

Geospatial Technologies

CSC

Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

N&AH Health Care Technician (PCA, CNA) 221-190-06

CSC

523-5375 Complete

Courses

Courses

Courses

B 335

Horticulture Technology

2

AAS

Courses

Courses

523-5432 Courses

Courses

B 775

Hospitality Management

6

AAS

523-5069 Courses

Courses

Courses

Courses

H&SS 480

Human Services

AAS

523-5178 Complete

Courses

Courses

Courses

CSC

Courses

Courses

523-5432 Complete

Courses

14

B Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Technology 221-909-46  

Information Systems Technology

B 299-01

Computer Programmer Specialization

AAS

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

B 299-03

Microcomputer Technical Support (Networking) Specialization

AAS

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

B 299-04

Microcomputer Applications (Administrative/

AAS

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

See footnote #7

B 299-05

Internet Applications Development   (Web Design) Specialization

AAS

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

B Computer Programmer 221-299-06

CSC

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

 B

CSC

 

523-5301

 

Complete

Office Applications) Specialization

Cyber Security 

College Catalog 2016-2017

7

65

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 221-732-09 B 221-299-18

Complete Internet Applications Development   (Web Design)

CSC

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

7, 14 B Microcomputer Applications 221-299-03

CSC

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

See footnote #7

B  Network Administration 221-732-00

CSC

Courses

523-5301  Complete

Courses

Complete

B 221-732-11

CSC

Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

8 B Legal Office Technology 221-260-10

CSC

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Courses

Courses

Courses

H&SS 648

Liberal Arts*

AA

523-5178 Complete

523-5263 Complete

Courses

Complete

H&SS 648-TP

Teacher Preparation Specialization*

AA

523-5178 Complete

523-5263 Complete

Courses

Courses

 

Management

B 212-03

Retail Management Specialization

AAS

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Courses

Courses

Courses

B 212-04

Small Business Management Specialization

AAS

523-5177 Courses

523-5301 Courses

Courses

See  footnote #10

N&AH 151

Medical Laboratory Technology

AAS

523-5375 Complete

Courses

Courses

See footnote #11

N&AH Medical Records Coder (Health Information 221-152-06 Management)

CSC

523-5375 Complete

Courses

Courses

Complete

N&AH 156

Nursing

AAS

523-5375 Complete

Courses

Courses

Courses

N&AH 160

Opticianry

AAS

523-5375 Complete

Courses

Courses

See footnote #11

CSC

523-5375 Complete

 

 

Complete See footnote #12

14

Network Engineering

9

10

11

11

12 N&AH Opticians Apprentice 221-160-04

 

Paralegal Studies

B 260-01

General Practice Specialization

AAS

Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

B 260-02

Litigation Specialization

AAS

Courses

523-5301 Complete

Courses

Courses

B Pastry Arts 221-242-04

CSC

523-5781 Complete

 

 

 

14 N&AH Pharmacy Technician 221-190-08

CSC

523-5375 Complete

 

 

Courses

N&AH 157

Practical Nursing

C

523-5375 Complete

Courses

Courses

Courses

N&AH 221-120-01

Pre-Dental Assisting

CSC

523-5375 Complete

Complete

Courses

Courses

N&AH 221-151-01

Pre-Medical Laboratory Technology

CSC

523-5375 Complete

Complete

Courses

Complete

66

College Catalog 2016-2017

PROGRAM INFORMATION N&AH Pre-Nursing 221-156-02

CSC

523-5375 Complete

Complete

Courses

Complete

N&AH 221-157-02

Pre-Practical Nursing

CSC

523-5375 Complete

Complete

Courses

Courses

N&AH 221-181-02

Pre-Respiratory Therapy

CSC

523-5375 Complete

Complete

Courses

Complete

B  221-212-70

Real Estate Agent/Broker

CSC

523-5177  Courses

523-5301  Complete

 

Complete

N&AH 221-152-02

Release of Health Information Specialist (Health Information Management)

CSC

523-5375 Complete

Courses

 

Complete

N&AH 181

Respiratory Therapy

AAS

523-5009 Complete

Courses

Courses

See footnote #11

 

Science

MS&E 880-02

Computer Science Specialization*

AS

523-5374 Courses

523-5225 Complete

Courses

Courses

MS&E 880-TP

Mathematics and Science Teacher   Preparation Specialization*

AS

523-5374 Complete

523-5225 Complete

Courses

Courses

MS&E 880-05

Mathematics Specialization*

AS

523-5374 Courses

523-5225 Complete

Courses

Courses

MS&E 880-01

Science Specialization*

AS

523-5374 Complete

523-5225 Complete

Courses

Complete

H&SS 882

Social Sciences*

AS

523-5178  Complete

523-5263  Complete

Courses

Complete

H&SS 882-01

American Sign Language/   Deaf Studies Specialization*

AS

523-5178 Complete

Courses

Courses

Courses

H&SS 882-02

Pre-Social/Work Specialization*

AS

523-5178 Courses

523-5263 Complete

Courses

Courses

H&SS 882-TP

Teacher Preparation Specialization*

AS

523-5178 Complete

523-5263 Complete

Courses

Courses

13, 14 H&SS Substance Abuse Counseling Education 221-480-30

CSC

523-5178 Courses

Courses

Courses

Courses

B Sustainable Agriculture 221-335-06

CSC

Courses

Courses

523-5432 Complete

Courses

B Welding 221-995-01

CSC

Courses

Courses

523-5432 Complete

Courses

11

B School of Business H&SS School of Humanities & Social Sciences N&AH School of Nursing & Allied Health MS&E School of Mathematics, Science & Engineering AAS Associate of Applied Science AA Associate of Arts  AS Associate of Science C Certificate CSC Career Studies Certificate

College Catalog 2016-2017

67

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

CURRICULUM PLANNING General Information Pertaining to Curricular Offerings 69 General Education Definition 69 General Education Goals and Objectives/ Outcomes 69 General Education Electives 71 Foreign Language Electives 73

68

College Catalog 2016-2017

CURRICULUM PLANNING  

Mathematics

General Information Pertaining to Curricular Offerings

Personal Development

In the following section, descriptions of all associate degree and certificate curriculums offered by the college are presented. Each curriculum description (1) provides a statement of purpose or intent of the curricular program, (2) states the occupational or transfer objectives for the program, (3) specifies curriculum admission requirements for entry into the program, (4) states the required courses and minimum number of credit hours for completion, and (5) provides an outline for sequencing the courses of study. Each curriculum is structured in accordance with policies established by the State Board for Community Colleges in Virginia. Additionally, the curriculums for all associate degree programs meet criteria set forth by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Curriculums for which the associate of applied science degree and certificate are awarded are all structured to ensure that graduates of these programs have a significant general education foundation, in addition to the necessary skill development training. For the AAS degree, general education comprises approximately 25 percent of the total credit hours; for certificate programs (not career studies certificates), this figure is a minimum of 15 percent. The associate of arts and associate of science degree programs are designed for transfer to baccalaureate programs offered at four-year colleges and universities. To avoid transfer problems, students should carefully select courses to fulfill elective requirements with the assistance of their advisors and upon an investigation of the transfer requirements of the institution to which transfer is considered. Not all curriculums of study are available on all campuses due to the specialized nature of the human and physical resources required to offer the instructional program. General education courses in the curriculums, however, may be taken at any of the three campus locations at which they are offered. The following table presents the requirements for associate degrees at Reynolds: Minimum Requirements for Associate Degrees  

Minimum Number Of Semester Hour Credits

General Education

AA

AS

AAA

AAS

a

6

6

3

3

Humanities/Fine Arts

6

6

3

3

Foreign Language (intermediate level)

6

0

0

0

Social/Behavioral Sciences

9

9

3

3

Sciences

7

7

Communication

b

0 or 3

c

0 or 3

6

6

0 or 3

2

2

2

c

0 or 3

c

2

d

Other Requirements for Associate Degrees Major field courses and electives (AA, AS); Career/technical courses (AAA, AAS) f

Total for Degree

18-21

24-27

49-53

49-53

60-63

60-63

65-69

65-69

e

e

a

  Must include at least one course in English composition. b

Only 6 semester hours of social/behavioral sciences are required for engineering majors who plan to transfer to a baccalaureate degree engineering program that requires 6 or fewer hours in this category, provided that the college/university publishes such requirements in its transfer guide. c

AAA and AAS degree programs must include a minimum of 3 credits in science or mathematics. d

Personal development includes health, physical education, or recreation courses that promote physical and emotional wellbeing and student development courses. Must include at least one student development (SDV) course. e

AAA/AAS degrees must contain a minimum of 15 semester hours of general education. Students should plan to take at least 30 hours in the major; the remaining hours will be appropriate to the major. f

Credit range for engineering programs is 60-72 semester hour credits. Credit range for AAA/AAS programs is 65-69, including nursing. For other programs in the Health Technologies, the range is 65-72 semester hours.

General Education Definition General education is that portion of the collegiate experience that addresses the knowledge, skills, competencies, attitudes, and values characteristic of an educated and well-informed citizen capable of functioning effectively in a complex and rapidly changing world. General education is unbounded by disciplines and honors the connections among bodies of knowledge – it is that portion of the college experience that pertains to the overall development of the student and not just to the specific occupational and/or program skills.

General Education Goals and Objectives/ Outcomes Reynolds Community College degree graduates will demonstrate competency in the following general education areas: 1. Communication A competent communicator can interact with others using all forms of communication, resulting in understanding and being understood. c

Degree graduates will demonstrate the ability to 1.1 understand and interpret complex materials;

College Catalog 2016-2017

69

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 1.2 assimilate, organize, develop, and present an idea formally  and informally;

4.2 access needed information effectively and efficiently;

1.3 use standard English;

4.3 evaluate information and its sources critically and incorporate selected information into his or her knowledge base;

1.4 use appropriate verbal and non-verbal responses in  interpersonal relations and group discussions;

4.4 use information effectively, individually or as a member of a group, to accomplish a specific purpose; and

1.5 use listening skills; and 1.6 recognize the role of culture in communication.

4.5 understand many of the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally.

2. Critical Thinking A competent critical thinker evaluates evidence carefully and applies reasoning to decide what to believe and how to act. Degree graduates will demonstrate the ability to

5. Personal Development An individual engaged in personal development strives for physical well-being and emotional maturity. Degree graduates will demonstrate the ability to

2.1 discriminate among degrees of credibility, accuracy, and reliability of inferences drawn from given data;

5.1 develop and/or refine personal wellness goals; and

2.2 recognize parallels, assumptions, or presuppositions in any given source of information; 2.3 evaluate the strengths and relevance of arguments on a particular question or issue; 2.4 weigh evidence and decide if generalizations or conclusions based on the given data are warranted; 2.5 determine whether certain conclusions or consequences are supported by the information provided; and 2.6 use problem-solving skills. 3. Cultural and Social Understanding A culturally and socially competent person possesses an awareness, understanding, and appreciation of the interconnectedness of the social and cultural dimensions within and across local, regional, state, and global communities. Degree graduates will demonstrate the ability to 3.1 assess the impact that social institutions have on individuals and culture—past, present, and future; 3.2 describe their own as well as others’ personal ethical systems and values within social institutions; 3.3 recognize the impact that arts and humanities have upon individuals and cultures; 3.4 recognize the role of language in social and cultural contexts; and 3.5 recognize the interdependence of distinctive world-wide social, economic, geo-political, and cultural systems. 4. Information Literacy A person who is competent in information literacy recognizes when information is needed and has the ability to locate, evaluate, and use it effectively. This statement was adapted from the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) definition, a division of the American Library Association (ALA).  Degree graduates will demonstrate the ability to 4.1 determine the nature and extent of the information needed;

70

5.2 develop and/or enhance the knowledge, skills, and understanding to make informed academic, social, personal, career, and interpersonal decisions. 6. Quantitative Reasoning A person who is competent in quantitative reasoning possesses the skills and knowledge necessary to apply the use of logic, numbers, and mathematics to deal effectively with common problems and issues. A person who is quantitatively literate can use numerical, geometric, and measurement data and concepts, mathematical skills, and principles of mathematical reasoning to draw logical conclusions and to make well-reasoned decisions. Degree graduates will demonstrate the ability to 6.1 use logical and mathematical reasoning within the context of various disciplines; 6.2 interpret and use mathematical formulas; 6.3 interpret mathematical models, such as graphs, tables, and schematics and draw inferences from them; 6.4 use graphical, symbolic, and numerical methods to analyze, organize, and interpret data; 6.5 estimate and consider answers to mathematical problems in order to determine reasonableness; and 6.6 represent mathematical information numerically, symbolically, and visually, using graphs and charts. 7. Scientific Reasoning A person who is competent in scientific reasoning adheres to a self-correcting system of inquiry (the scientific method) and relies on empirical evidence to describe, understand, predict, and control natural phenomena. Degree graduates will demonstrate the ability to 7.1 generate an empirically evidenced and logical argument; 7.2 distinguish a scientific argument from a non-scientific argument; 7.3 reason by deduction, induction, and analogy; 7.4 distinguish between causal and correlational relationships; and

College Catalog 2016-2017

CURRICULUM PLANNING 7.5 recognize methods of inquiry that lead to scientific knowledge.

General Education Electives Following is a list of approved general education electives in the areas of humanities/fine arts, mathematics, personal wellness, science, and social/behavioral sciences. Prior to enrolling in the courses on this list, students should check the course descriptions to ensure that they meet any pre- or co-requisites.To avoid transfer problems, students should carefully select courses to fulfill elective requirements with the assistance of their advisors and upon an investigation of the transfer requirements of the institution to which transfer is contemplated. Humanities/Fine Arts

REL 255 - Selected Problems and Issues in Religion: Christianity in Film REL 255 - Selected Problems and Issues in Religion: Women and the Bible SPA 233 - Survey of Spanish Civilization and Literature I   Humanities Courses that Require ENG 112 as a Prerequisite 1

ENG 233 - The Bible as Literature 1,2

ENG 241 - Survey of American Literature I 1,2

ENG 242

- Survey of American Literature II

1,2

ARC 201 - History of Modern Architecture

ENG 243 - Survey of English Literature I

ART 100 - Art Appreciation

ENG 244

ART 101, 102 - History and Appreciation of Art I, II

ENG 251

3

ART 105 - Art in World Culture ART 106 - History of Modern Art ASL 125 - History of the Deaf Community ASL 220 - Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English ASL 225 - Literature of the US Deaf Community

1,2

- Survey of English Literature II

1,2,3

- Survey of World Literature I

1,2,3

- Survey of World Literature II

ENG 252

1,2

- Survey of African American Literature I

1,2

- Survey of African American Literature II

1,2

- Women in Literature I

1,2

- Women in Literature II

1,2

- Topics in English: Literature

ENG 253

ENG 254 ENG 273

CST 151 - Film Appreciation I

ENG 274

CST 152 - Film Appreciation II

ENG 295

CST 229 - Intercultural Communication

1

HUM 100 - Survey of the Humanities

2

These courses have been designated writing-intensive (offer enhanced instruction in writing) by the English faculty.

HUM 260 - Survey of Twentieth-Century Culture

Students needing to take two literature courses are not required to take both Part I and Part II of the same literature course.

MUS 121 - Music Appreciation I

3

MUS 221 - History of Music I

Additional humanities/fine arts courses may be approved by the dean, School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

MUS 225 - The History of Jazz PHI 101 - Introduction to Philosophy PHI 111 - Logic I PHI 220 - Ethics PHI 225 - Selected Problems in Applied Ethics PHI 226 - Social Ethics 3

PHI 260 - Studies in Eastern Thinking 3

3

REL 231 , 232  - Religions of the World I, II REL 233 - Introduction to Islam REL 240 - Religions in America

College Catalog 2016-2017

These courses have an international focus. 

Personal Wellness DIT 121 - Nutrition I EMS 111 - Emergency Medical Technician - Basic EMS 112, 113 - Emergency Medical Technician – Basic I and II EMS 151 - Introduction to Advanced Life Support HLT 100 - First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation HLT 105 - Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation HLT 106 - First Aid and Safety HLT 110 - Concepts of Personal and Community Health HLT 115 - Introduction to Personal and Community Health

71

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE HLT 116 - Introduction to Personal Wellness Concepts

PED 195 - Topics in Physical Education: Pickleball I

HLT 119 - First Responder

PED 270 - Tai Chi II

HLT 121 - Introduction to Drug Use and Abuse

PED 295 - Topics in Physical Education: Hip Hop Dance II

HLT 200 - Human Sexuality

PSG 110 - Introduction to the Science of Sleep Medicine

HLT 203 - Men’s Health

1

1  

HLT 204 - Women's Health

HLT 119 counts as a wellness elective for AAS degrees, but NOT AA and AS degrees.

HLT 215 - Personal Stress and Stress Management

Additional personal wellness courses may be approved by the dean, School of Nursing and Allied Health.

HLT 226 - AIDS Awareness

Mathematics

HLT 230 - Principles of Nutrition and Human Development

MTH 120 - Introduction to Mathematics

PED 100 - Pilates PED 103 - Aerobic Fitness I PED 104 - Aerobic Fitness II PED 109 - Yoga

1

1

MTH 121 - Fundamentals of Mathematics I 1

MTH 146 - Introduction to Elementary Statistics 1,2,3

- Math for Liberal Arts I

1,2,3

- Math for Liberal Arts II

MTH 151

PED 110 - Zumba

MTH 152

PED 111, 112 - Weight Training I, II

MTH 163 - Precalculus I

PED 116 - Lifetime Fitness and Wellness

MTH 166 - Precalculus with Trigonometry

PED 117 - Fitness Walking

MTH 170 - Foundations in Contemporary Mathematics

PED 120 - Yoga II

MTH 173, 174 - Calculus with Analytic Geometry I-II

PED 123 - Tennis I

MTH 240 - Statistics

PED 133 - Golf I

MTH 270 - Applied Calculus

PED 134 - Golf II

MTH 282 - Mathematical Reasoning: Introduction to Higher Mathematics

PED 135 - Bowling I PED 136 - Bowling II PED 137, 138 - Martial Arts I, II

4

4



This course typically does not transfer to a four-year college.



Enrollment in this course must be approved by a faculty advisor. 3 

PED 140 - Water Aerobics PED 141 - Swimming I PED 144 - Skin and Scuba Diving PED 150 - Soccer I PED 152 - Basketball PED 160 - Modern Dance PED 170 - Tai Chi I PED 189 - Saltwater Fishing

This course does not count for any of the college’s AA or AS (transfer) degrees. 4

Students will not receive credit for both MTH 163 and MTH 166.

Additional mathematics courses may be approved by the dean, School of Mathematics, Science, and Engineering.

Science 1

BIO 101 - General Biology I BIO 102 - General Biology II 2

BIO 107 - Biology of the Environment 2,3

2,3

PED 195 - Topics in Physical Education: Fly Fishing

BIO 141 , 142  - Human Anatomy and Physiology I, II

PED 195 - Topics in Physical Education: Geocaching I

BIO 205 - General Microbiology

PED 195 - Topics in Physical Education: Hip Hop Dance I

BIO 206 - Cell Biology

72

2

2

College Catalog 2016-2017

CURRICULUM PLANNING BIO 231, 232 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I, II

HIS 121, 122 - United States History I, II

2

HIS 127 - Women in American History

2

HIS 141, 142 - African-American History I, II

BIO 256 - General Genetics BIO 270 - General Ecology

1

CHM 111, 112 - College Chemistry I, II

HIS 203 - History of African Civilization

CHM 241/245 - Organic Chemistry I and Lab

HIS 253 , 254  - History of Asian Civilizations I, II

CHM 242/246 - Organic Chemistry II and Lab

HIS 267 - The Second World War

2

ENV 195 - Topics in Environmental Science: The Environment and its Chemistry GOL 105 - Physical Geology GOL 106 - Historical Geology PHY 201, 202 - General College Physics I, II PHY 241, 242 - University Physics I, II The following are additional laboratory science courses that may be taken by non-Science majors only: BIO 100 - Basic Human Biology (not recommended for students in AA or AS degrees) 1

1

1

1

HIS 269 - Civil War and Reconstruction HIS 276 - United States History Since World War II HIS 281 - History of Virginia I HIS 282 - History of Virginia II PLS 135 - American National Politics PLS 211, 212 - United States Government I, II PSY 200 - Principles of Psychology PSY 205 - Personal Conflict and Crisis Management PSY 215 - Abnormal Psychology

BIO 106 - Life Science

PSY 230 - Developmental Psychology

CHM 101, 102 General Chemistry I, II

PSY 235 - Child Psychology

PHI 101 - Introduction to Physics I

PSY 270 - Psychology of Human Sexuality

1

SOC 200 - Principles of Sociology

Students will not receive credit for both BIO 101 and BIO 106.

2

Science AS students may use these courses only as laboratory science electives beyond the two laboratory science electives that must be year-long courses, e.g., BIO 101-102 and PHY 201-202. 3 

SOC 210 - Survey of Physical and Cultural Anthropology SOC 215 - Sociology of the Family

BIO 141-142 generally do not transfer for the Liberal Arts AA and Social Sciences AS degree programs. Please check with the four-year institution you plan to attend.

SOC 268 - Social Problems

Additional science courses may be approved by the dean, School of Mathematics, Science, and Engineering.

Additional social/behavioral sciences courses may be approved by the dean, School of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Social/Behavioral Sciences

1

These courses have an international focus.

GEO 210 - People and the Land: Introduction to Cultural Geography

Foreign Language Electives Following is a list of approved foreign language electives. These foreign language courses do not count as humanities/fine arts general education electives. To avoid transfer problems, students should carefully select courses to fulfill elective requirements with the assistance of their advisors and upon an investigation of the transfer requirements of the institution to which transfer is contemplated.

GEO 220 - World Regional Geography

ARA 101 - Beginning Arabic I

GEO 225 - Economic Geography

ARA 102 - Beginning Arabic II

ECO 120 - Survey of Economics ECO 201, 202 - Principles of Economics I, II GEO 200 - Physical Geography

1

1

HIS 101 , 102  - History of Western Civilization I, II 1

1  

HIS 111 , 112 - History of World Civilization I, II

College Catalog 2016-2017

ASL 101 - American Sign Language I ASL 102 - American Sign Language II

73

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ASL 201 - American Sign Language III or ASL 295 - American Sign Language III ASL 202 - American Sign Language IV or ASL 295 - American Sign Language IV CHI 101 - Beginning Chinese I CHI 102 - Beginning Chinese II FRE 101 - Beginning French I FRE 102 - Beginning French II FRE 201 - Intermediate French I FRE 202 - Intermediate French II GER 101 - Beginning German I GER 102 - Beginning German II GER 201 - Intermediate German I GER 202- Intermediate German II SPA 101 - Beginning Spanish I SPA 102 - Beginning Spanish II SPA 201 - Intermediate Spanish I SPA 202 - Intermediate Spanish II

74

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS  

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

College Catalog 2016-2017

75

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Transfer Associate Degrees & Certificates

76

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS  

Business Administration

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

BUS 100

Introduction to Business

3

0

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

2

Associate of Science

___ ___ TOTAL

PURPOSE: With the rapid development of business and industry in Virginia, there is a great demand for qualified personnel in business administration to provide leadership for this economic growth. The associate of science degree with a major in Business Administration is designed for persons who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to complete a baccalaureate degree program in business administration.

16-17 0-2 17

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

United States History or History of Western Civilization

3

0

3

Applied Calculus

3

0

3

_____ 

Approved Elective (does not include personal wellness courses and non-transfer math courses) 

3

0

3

ITE 140 or 

Spreadsheet Software (Excel) or  Desktop Database Software (Access)

3

0

3

15

0

15

5

HIS___

MTH 270

1

2,3,5

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: The following high school units are strongly recommended: four units of English, three units of college preparatory mathematics, and one unit of laboratory science. This curriculum requires courses in mathematics, natural sciences, social sciences, and health and physical education, in addition to principles of economics and accounting, which are usually required in the first two years of a baccalaureate business administration curriculum. With the assistance of their advisor, students are urged to acquaint themselves with the requirements of the major department in the institution to which transfer is contemplated. Students are advised to complete the AS degree at the community college, choosing courses that satisfy the mathematics, laboratory science and elective requirements of the four-year college as well as the AS degree. If students contemplate transferring to an out-of-state college, they should also make contact with the four-year college and consult that college’s catalog before deciding which courses to take.

ITE 150

5

TOTAL ACC 211

Principles of Accounting I

3

0

3

ECO 201

4

Principles of Economics I Macroeconomics

3

0

3

ENG___

2,5

Any 200-Level Literature Course

3

0

3

Laboratory Science

3

3

4

Approved Elective (does not include personal wellness courses and non-transfer math courses) 

3

0

3

15

3

16

_____

2,5 2,3,5

_____ 

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once.

TOTAL

FOUR-YEAR COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY TRANSFER INFORMATION: Additional information regarding transfer requirements for JMU, VSU, ODU, UVA Continuing and Professional Studies, MBC Adult Degree Program in Richmond, Longwood University, and UR SPCS is available at reynolds.edu/ curriculum/business_administrationas.

TOTAL

 10.15.15

CURRICULUM:

1

ACC 212 ECO 202

Principles of Accounting II

3

0

3

4

Principles of Economics II – Microeconomics

3

0

3

2

Any 200-Level Literature Course

3

0

3

Laboratory Science

3

3

4

12

3

13

ENG ___ _____

2

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in  Business Administration

61

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB.  CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

 Students transferring to Virginia Commonwealth University are required to complete a semester of pre-calculus and a semester of calculus. If transferring to another university, students should see the program head for substitution of an appropriate math course.

United States History or History of Western Civilization

3

0

3

2

MTH 163

Precalculus I

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

5

HIS___

1

College Catalog 2016-2017

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. Students planning to transfer must take two semesters of laboratory sciences. 

77

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 3

 Personal wellness courses and non-transfer math courses may not be used to satisfy this approved elective. Students planning to transfer to Virginia Commonwealth University must take CST 100 or CST 110 to satisfy this approved elective. Students planning to transfer to institutions other than VCU may also select from the list of approved general education electives (humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, and science) that is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.  4

 In addition to the economics requirements, students are advised to complete a full year of social science or humanities (see footnote 2 above) if required by the four-year college or university to which they plan to transfer. The business programs of the following senior institutions require MTH 240: College of William and Mary, Radford University, JMU, University of Richmond, and University of Virginia. If majoring in Information Systems at VCU, students should take an additional math course at Reynolds: MTH 286 or MTH 287. MTH 270 is a prerequisite for MTH 286 and MTH 287. 5

 Students planning to transfer to Virginia State University (VSU) as 3rd year business school majors must complete the following courses at Reynolds rather than the ones listed in the table above: World History or World Geography elective, BUS 240, BUS 220,  CST 229, MTH 164, and FIN 107. Additionally, students transferring from Reynolds will need to complete a total of 2 personal wellness elective credits and one additional social science elective prior to transfer from Reynolds to VSU. Please refer to the Articulation Agreement between Reynolds and the Reginald F. Lewis College of Business at VSU.

Engineering Associate of Science SPECIALIZATIONS:   Mechanical/General Engineering Chemical/Biological Engineering Electrical/Computer Engineering PURPOSE: The demand for technically trained people is increasing rapidly in Virginia as well as throughout the world. The engineer is a most important member of the technical team, which includes the scientist, technician, and skilled craftsman. Opportunities are unlimited for men and women in the field of engineering. Science is so diversified now that one may enter almost any specialization and find employment. The preparation for the engineering profession is based on a rigorous program, especially in mathematics and science. The Associate of Science degree in Engineering is designed for persons who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to complete a baccalaureate degree in one of the following engineering fields: aerospace, agriculture, architecture, biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, environmental, industrial, materials, mechanical, mining, nuclear, or ocean. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

78

The Mechanical/General Engineering specialization is designed for persons who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to pursue a degree in mechanical, civil, aerospace, ocean, or mining engineering. For students who do not yet know which discipline they want to pursue, this specialization provides a fundamental engineering education that will help prepare students for a future in any engineering field. The Chemical/Biological Engineering specialization is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to pursue a bachelor’s degree in chemical, biomedical, biological, or environmental engineering. The Electrical/Computer Engineering specialization is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to pursue a degree in electrical or computer engineering. PROGRAM NOTES: Applicants shall have (a) completed placement testing and (b) met with their advisor to establish a planned course of study prior to being allowed to register for courses. Satisfactory completion of the following high school units or their equivalent, at a minimum, is strongly recommended: four units of English, one unit of laboratory science (preferably physical science), one unit of social studies, and four units of mathematics (two units of algebra, one unit of plane geometry, one unit of advanced mathematics or trigonometry and solid geometry). This program requires a steady progression through at least four high-level mathematics courses, generally taken at a rate of one per semester. MTH 173 and MTH 174 are pre- or co-requisites for several engineering courses. Applicants who place into developmental mathematics will face additional mathematics courses, which do not count toward degree progress, before even qualifying for MTH 173. Accordingly, applicants are urged to study their math thoroughly before taking the mathematics placement test to avoid having to repeat one or more mathematics courses unnecessarily. This program includes the courses usually required in the first two years of a baccalaureate engineering curriculum. The minimum number of credits required for graduation from the Reynolds Engineering AS degree is 68. Students should consult with their engineering advisor at the earliest possible date to acquaint themselves with the requirements of the engineering program at the college or university to which transfer is planned. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by passing the computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, or by completing either ITE 115, Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts, or CSC 155, Computer Concepts and Applications, or equivalent. CSC 155 is preferred for students in this program. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM: Mechanical/General Engineering

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

College Chemistry I

3

3

4

MTH 173

Calculus with Analytic Geometry 5 I

0

5

EGR 124

Introduction to Engineering and Engineering Methods

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

CHM 111

1

2

___ ___ TOTAL ENG 112

3

EGR 110 or

3

CSC 130

EGR 140 or

HRS. HRS. CRE. ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

College Chemistry I

3

3

4

MTH 173

Calculus with Analytic Geometry 5 I

0

5

EGR 124

Introduction to Engineering and Engineering Methods

3

0

3

College Success Skills

1

0

1

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

CHM 111

1

SDV 100

15-16 3-5

17

College Composition II

3

0

3

Engineering Graphics or Scientific Programming

2 4

2 0

3 4

Engineering Mechanics – Statics or Engineering Elective

3

0

2

___ ___ TOTAL

15-16 3-5

17

College Composition II

3

0

3

Engineering Graphics or Scientific Programming

2 4

2 0

3 4

CHM 112

College Chemistry II

3

1

4

MTH 174

Calculus with Analytic Geometry 5 II

0

5

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

0

3

ENG 112 3

EGR 110 or

3

CSC 130

3

4

EGR ___ MTH 174

2

___ ___

2

Calculus with Analytic Geometry 5 II

0

5

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

0

3

3

___ ___ TOTAL

3

16-18 0-3 18-19

PHY 241

University Physics I

3

3

4

16-18 0-2 17-18

___ ___

Chemical/Biological Engineering 3 Elective

0-3

3-4

University Physics I

3

3

4

MTH 277

Vector Calculus

4

0

4

EGR ___

Engineering Elective

3

0-3

3-4

5

0

3

MTH 277

Vector Calculus

4

0

4

Chemical/Biological Engineering 3 Elective

EGR 206 or

Engineering Economy or Engineering Elective

3

0

3

2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

16

3-6

17-18

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

___ ___

16

3-6

17-18

___ ___

TOTAL PHY 241 4

4

EGR ___

2

___ ___ TOTAL

Engineering Elective

3

0-3

3-4

2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

PHY 242

University Physics II

3

3

4

MTH 279

Ordinary Differential Equations

4

0

4

16

3-6

17-18

___ ___ ___ ___

TOTAL

___ ___ ___ ___ TOTAL

4

EGR ___

5

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Engineering, Mechanical/General Engineering Specialization

68

5

Chemical/Biological Engineering 3 Elective

0-3

3-4

2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

___ ___

2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

PHY 242

University Physics II

3

3

4

MTH 279

Ordinary Differential Equations

4

0

4

16

3-6

17-18

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Engineering, Chemical/Biomedical Specialization

68

  CURRICULUM: Electrical/Computer Specialization

  CURRICULUM: Chemical/Biomedical Specialization COURSE

TITLE

College Catalog 2016-2017

LEC. LAB. CRS.

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

79

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 3

3

4

MTH 173

Calculus with Analytic Geometry 5 I

0

5

EGR 124

Introduction to Engineering and Engineering Methods

3

0

3

College Success Skills

1

0

1

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

CHM 111

College Chemistry I

1

SDV 100 2

___ ___ TOTAL

15-16 3-5

17

EGR 110 and EGR 124 transfer together as a package for all disciplines at Virginia Tech. Either course by itself will not be accepted by Virginia Tech. EGR 110 and EGR 124 as a package are required for Mechanical Engineering or Nuclear Engineering at VCU. CSC 130 or equivalent and EGR 124 are required as a package for Electrical or Computer Engineering at VCU. EGR 123 and EGR 124 will still be accepted by VCU as a package for students who have successfully completed these courses. Students should consult their engineering program advisor for assistance with selecting the appropriate course(s) for other disciplines at VCU or other transfer institutions. 4

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

CSC 130

Scientific Programming

4

 0

4

EGR 206 or

Engineering Economy or

3

0

3

Calculus with Analytic Geometry 5 II

0

5

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

18

0

18

6

EGR ___ MTH 174

2

___ ___

Electrical/Computer Engineering Elective

TOTAL PHY 241

University Physics I

3

3

4

EGR 251

Basic Electric Circuits I

3

0

3

EGR 255

Electric Circuits Laboratory

0

1

1

CSC 210

Programming with C++

3

0

3

Vector Calculus

4

0

4

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

16

4

18

MTH 277 2

___ ___ TOTAL

MTH 285

Linear Algebra

3

0

3

2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

___ ___

2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

PHY 242

University Physics II

3

3

4

MTH 279

Ordinary Differential Equations

4

0

4

16

3

17

___ ___

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Engineering, Electrical/Computer Specialization

68

02.02.2016 1

CHM 112 may be required by some four-year institutions for their engineering baccalaureate degree programs. Students should verify the chemistry requirements of the institutions to which they plan to transfer. 2

A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

80

3

Engineering electives are: EGR 110, EGR 245, EGR 246, EGR 248, EGR 251, EGR 255, MTH 285, CSC 130, and CSC 210. 5

Chemical/Biological Engineering electives are: CHM 241 and lab, CHM 242 and lab, MTH 285, EGR 140, EGR 246, EGR 110, EGR 206, EGR 251 and 255, EGR 248, BIO 101, and BIO 102. 6

Electrical/Computer Engineering electives are: EGR 110, EGR 206, and EGR 248. NOTES: 1) Virginia Tech requires a two-credit linear algebra course. That requirement can be satisfied by completing MTH 285 at Reynolds. 2) Students should consult with their Engineering advisor at the earliest possible date to acquaint themselves with the requirements of the Engineering program at the college or university to which transfer is planned.

General Education Certificate PURPOSE: The General Education Certificate is designed to serve as an intermediate step toward the associate of arts or associate of science degree for students who plan to transfer to a fouryear college or university. The curriculum provides students with a foundation in the general education core competency areas of communication, critical thinking, information literacy, cultural and social understanding, personal development, quantitative reasoning, and scientific reasoning. First-time job seekers who come to their employers with basic writing, analytical reasoning, and computing skills find they can be more competitive in the job market and more valuable in the workplace. Counter and retail clerks, administrative support, social and human service assistants, and customer service positions, as well as a variety of other fields, require individuals to apply their entry-level knowledge and skills while exploring the world of work and relevant career opportunities. For those employees who wish to pursue their education, the general education certificate provides foundational courses that allow students to progress toward the associate degree or to transfer to a senior institution. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: This certificate is approximately equivalent to the first year of study in any one of Reynolds’ associate of arts or associate of science transfer degree programs. The associate degree is the gateway for transfer to a four-year college or

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS university through one of many articulation and guaranteed admission agreements currently available to Reynolds students. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

1,2

Approved Transfer Mathematics

3

0

3

1

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

1

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

16

3

17

___ ___

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

CST 110 or  ENG 112

Introduction to Speech Communication or College Composition II

3

0

3

1

Social/Behavioral Science Electives

6

0

6

1

Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

15

3

16

___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ 1

__ ___ TOTAL

1

___ ___ ___ ___ TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for General Education Certificate 33 03.13.15 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. Courses on that list footnoted as “typically does not transfer” do not meet the electives requirements for this program. 2

 Students should consult their advisor and transfer institution about which math course to take. Mathematics courses that will fulfill this requirement include MTH 163, MTH 166, MTH 170, MTH 151, and  MTH 173.

Liberal Arts Associate of Arts SPECIALIZATION Teacher Preparation PURPOSE:  The Associate of Arts degree in Liberal Arts lays the foundation for a Bachelor of Arts degree in art and art history, communication, English/literature, history, humanities, journalism, music, philosophy, pre-law, social sciences, religious studies, and world languages.  The liberal arts promote a broad background of knowledge across the arts, humanities, languages, and social sciences to develop students' abilities in analytical and critical thinking, written and oral communication, and understanding

College Catalog 2016-2017

global cultural awareness.  The Liberal Arts degree is a twoyear program designed for those students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to complete a Bachelor of Arts degree.  While the program is designed to provide transfer paths that will match the requirements of four-year colleges and universities, the requirements may differ.  Therefore, students are strongly urged to work with their assigned advisor and to acquaint themselves with the requirements of the major department in the college or university to which they plan to transfer.  This program requires intermediate proficiency (two years of coursework or its equivalent) in a language other than English. Each student admitted to the program is assigned an academic advisor to help plan the appropriate course of studies to transfer to the student's choice of a four-year college or university.  Students who complete the program generally transfer as juniors. THE TEACHER PREPARATION SPECIALIZATION is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university in a major that requires a background in the liberal arts, and who plan to teach at the elementary, middle, or secondary school level. The Teacher Preparation specialization enables the student to participate in two field experiences in area schools. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: The following high school units are strongly recommended: three units of college preparatory mathematics and two years of a foreign language. NOTE TO PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS: Students who wish to be licensed to teach in Virginia should earn a baccalaureate degree in a liberal arts or science field. Students should consult with their advisor regarding elective choices that match their desired teaching endorsement area(s). While enrolled at the community college, students should prepare for and successfully complete Praxis I, the initial teacher licensure examination. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT:  Students in the Liberal Arts degree program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. PROGRAM OUTCOMES: Upon successful completion of the AA degree in Liberal Arts, the student will be able to demonstrate: • • •

An interdisciplinary understanding of the human experience from different global, cultural, sociological, and historical perspectives; An awareness of how social and cultural contexts shape and influence forms of human expression; and An understanding of the interdependence of academic disciplines and how an interdisciplinary perspective contributes to understanding the human experience.

CURRICULUM:

81

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Liberal Arts — Associate of Arts

1

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

HIS__

Western Civilization, World History, or other non-U.S. History

3

0

3

Foundations of Contemporary Mathematics  or Precalculus I

3

0

3

1

MTH 170   or 1

MTH 163

_______

2

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

_______

3

Foreign Language

4

0

4

TOTAL

14-15 0-2 15

ENG 112 HIS__

College Composition II

3

0

3

U.S. History

3

0

3

3

0

3

Foreign Language

4

0

4

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts or Computer Concepts and Applications

3

0

3

MTH 240   Statistics  or or Applied Calculus 1 MTH 270 1

3

______ ITE 115 or

4

CSC 155

4

TOTAL

0

16

Any 200-Level Literature Course

3

0

3

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

3

Foreign Language

3

0

3

2

Approved Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

7

Approved Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

15

3

16

5

2,6

______ ______ ______ ______ TOTAL

5

Any 200-Level Literature Course

3

0

3

2,6

Approved Humanities/Fine Arts Elective or Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

3

Foreign Language

3

0

3

7

Approved Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

12

3

13

ENG___ ______

______ ______ TOTAL

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. Students are advised to work with an advisor to choose electives related to their transfer goals and to check the requirements of their transfer institution. 3

A list of approved foreign language courses is provided in the catalog under the Curriculum Planning and Design section. Students must take the same foreign language through the 202-level or its equivalent. Students who have satisfactorily completed two years of a foreign language in high school may take the Foreign Language Achievement Testing Service (FLATS) test through the testing centers to receive up to 12 credits toward their foreign language requirement. Students who have acquired foreign language CLEP scores should refer to the College Catalog for the acceptable minimum scores for any Reynolds/VCCS course equivalent.  Students can then apply to Admissions and Records to have the scores evaluated. Some BS programs require intermediate-level foreign language. Many colleges and universities accept American Sign Language as a foreign language credit. Students should consult their transfer institution about language requirements.   Students should consult their advisor and transfer institution about the computer literacy course to take. Students who have good backgrounds in computers may petition for credit by examination. 5

   Students may take any 200-level LITERATURE course. 200level literature courses are designated writing-intensive. ENG 210, 215, and 217 do NOT satisfy the literature requirement. For transfer purposes, students should consult their advisor and transfer institution about their literature selections. Degree requirements may be fulfilled by students taking sequential or non-sequential courses in the same or different subject area.  6

 Degree requirements may be fulfilled by students taking sequential or non-sequential courses in the same or different subject area. Students are advised to work with an advisor to choose electives related to their transfer goals and to check the requirements of their transfer institution.  7

Total Minimum Credits for AA Degree in Liberal Arts 02.02.16

2

4

16

ENG___

 Students should consult with their advisor and preferred transfer institution about which math courses to take. MTH 163 followed by MTH 240 or MTH 270 are more universally transferable. Students planning to transfer to VCU may take MTH 170, followed by MTH 240.  Students who intend to major in economics or anthropology at VCU must take MTH 163.  

60

 A list of approved laboratory science electives is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.  NAS and below 100-level sciences do not satisfy this requirement. Students are advised to work with an advisor to choose laboratory science electives related to their transfer goals and to check the requirements of their transfer institution. A frequent transfer option for Liberal Arts students is BIO 106 or BIO 107, followed by GOL 105.

 

 

82

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS CURRICULUM: Liberal Arts — Associate of Arts Teacher Preparation Specialization

ECO 202 or

COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

SDV 101

Orientation to  Teacher Preparation

2

0

2

HIS___

United States History, or African-American History, or Western Civilization, or World Civilization

3

0

3

Foundations of Contemporary Mathematics

3

0

3

MTH 170

1

or MTH 163

Precalculus I

2

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

3

Foreign Language

4

0

4

______ ______ TOTAL

15-16 0-2 16

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

HIS___

United States History, or African-American History, or Western Civilization, or World Civilization

3

0

3

Statistics or Applied Calculus

3

0

3

Foreign Language

4

0

4

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts or Computer Concepts and Applications

3

0

3

MTH 240 or MTH 270

1

1

3

______ ITE 115 or

4

CSC 155

4

TOTAL

16

0

16

Any 200-Level Literature Course

3

0

3

People and the Land: Introduction to Cultural Geography

3

0

3

______

Foreign Language

3

0

3

EDU 200

Introduction to Teaching as a Profession

2

2

3

Approved Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

ENG___

5

GEO 210

3

6

______ TOTAL

14

5

16

______

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

ECO 201 or 

Principles of Economics IMacroeconomics or

3

0

3

2

College Catalog 2016-2017

ECO 120

7

Survey of Economics

3

Foreign Language

3

0

3

6

Approved Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

12

3

13

Total Minimum Credits for AA Degree in  Liberal Arts, Teacher Preparation Specialization

61

______ ______ TOTAL

02.02.16

 or 1

Principles of Economics IIMicroeconomics or

1

 Students should consult with their advisor and preferred transfer institution about which math course to take.  MTH 163 followed by MTH 240 or MTH 270 are more universally transferable. Students planning to transfer to VCU may take MTH 170. Students who intend to major in economics or anthropology at VCU must take MTH 163. 2

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. To avoid transfer problems, students should carefully select courses to fulfill elective requirements with the assistance of their advisors and upon an investigation of the transfer requirements of the institution to which transfer is contemplated. 3

 A list of approved foreign language courses is provided in the catalog under the Curriculum Planning and Design section. Students must take the same foreign language through the 202-level or its equivalent.  Students who have satisfactorily completed two years of a foreign language in high school may take the Foreign Language Achievement Testing Service (FLATS) test through the testing centers for up to 12 credits toward their language requirement.   Students who have acquired foreign language CLEP scores should refer to the College Catalog for the acceptable minimum scores for any Reynolds/VCCS course equivalent.  Students can then apply to Admissions and Records to have the scores evaluated.  Some BS programs require intermediate-level foreign language. Many colleges and universities accept American Sign Language as a foreign language credit.  Students are advised to clarify transfer opportunities with their transfer institution. 4

 Students should consult with their advisor and transfer institution about the computer literacy course to take.  Students who have good backgrounds in computers may petition for credit by examination. 5

 Students may take any 200-level LITERATURE course. 200level literature courses are designated writing-intensive. ENG 210, 215, and 217 do NOT satisfy the literature requirement. For transfer purposes, students should consult their advisor and transfer institution about their literature selections. Degree requirements may be fulfilled by students taking sequential or non-sequential courses in the same or different subject area.

83

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 6

 A list of approved laboratory science electives is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. Future elementary teachers are recommended to take one semester of physical science and one semester of biological science.  NAS and below 100-level sciences do not satisfy this requirement. Students are advised to check the requirements of their transfer institution. A frequent transfer option for Liberal Arts students is BIO 106 or BIO 107 followed by GOL 105. 7

 Students should consult with their advisor and transfer institution to determine the best choice for their program.

Science Associate of Science SPECIALIZATIONS Science Computer Science Mathematics Mathematics and Science Teacher Preparation PURPOSE: The associate degree in Science is intended for those who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university to complete a bachelor of science degree in the natural and physical sciences, mathematics, or computer science. There are four specializations in this degree program that enable students to complete courses that align with their intended majors at a four-year college or university. The Science specialization is designed for persons who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university in a major that requires a background in the natural or physical sciences and mathematics. With the many advances taking place in all areas of science, the opportunities for persons with expertise in this area are rapidly increasing. This program provides the necessary training for transfer into a broad range of scientific fields, from botany to zoology and from chemistry or geology to physics. In addition, the Science specialization is designed to meet the requirements for admission to a professional school or upperdivision major for career preparation in many of the medical professions including nursing, pharmacy, medicine, and veterinary medicine. The Computer Science specialization is designed for persons who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university in a major that requires a background in the sciences, mathematics, and computer science. Student familiarity with or expertise in computer science is frequently a requirement for study in the disciplines of biology, chemistry, physics, science education, engineering, manufacturing, and related fields. This program will provide the opportunity to obtain this needed preparation. In this rapidly changing field, students should regularly meet with their advisor to keep up with course and curriculum updates. The Mathematics specialization is designed for persons who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university in a major that requires a background in the sciences, mathematics, and computer science. The Mathematics specialization includes the

courses usually required in the first two years of a baccalaureate degree program in mathematics. The Mathematics and Science Teacher Preparation specialization is designed for persons who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university in a major that requires a background in the sciences and/or mathematics, and who plan to teach at the elementary, middle, or secondary school level. The Mathematics and Science Teacher Preparation specialization enables the student to participate in field experiences in area schools. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: The following high school units are strongly recommended for the Science specialization: four units of English, three units of college preparatory mathematics, one unit of laboratory science, and two units of foreign language. The following high school units are strongly recommended for the Computer Science and Mathematics specializations: four units of English; four units of college preparatory mathematics, including algebra (two units), geometry and trigonometry (or advanced math); two units of laboratory science; and one unit of social studies. Students in the Computer Science and Mathematics specializations are urged to begin their programs of study during the fall semester because many courses are sequential and only offered once a year. Students are encouraged to seek information from the upperdivision college, university, or professional school to which transfer is intended as to specific requirements for a particular major or specific admission requirements. NOTE TO PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS: Students who wish to be licensed to teach in Virginia should earn a baccalaureate degree in a liberal arts, science, or mathematics field. Students should consult with their advisor regarding elective choices that match their desired teaching endorsement area(s). While enrolled at the community college, students should prepare for and successfully complete Praxis I, the initial teacher licensure examination. Students preparing to take the Praxis I examination may wish to enroll in Reynolds courses MTH 50 and ENG 50. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by passing the computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, or by completing CSC 155, Computer Concepts and Applications. Students not passing the computer competency exam for CSC 155 may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM: Science Specialization COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

Approved Laboratory Science I

3

3

4

1,3

______

84

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS MTH 166  or  MTH 173

2

CSC___

Precalculus with Trigonometry 5 or  Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

0

5

Computer Science Elective

0

3-4

TOTAL

3-4

16-17

College Composition II

3

0

3

______

Approved Laboratory Science II

3

3

4

MTH 240 or  MTH 270 or  MTH 173  or 

Statistics 3-5 or  Applied Calculus or Calculus with Analytic Geometry I or Calculus with Analytic Geometry II

0

3-5

1

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

1

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

1,3

MTH 174

2

______ ______ TOTAL

 MTH 173-174 are recommended for students planning to major in Physics or Chemistry. Students not prepared for MTH 173 may be required to take MTH 166 prior to taking MTH 173. 3

15-16 3

ENG 112

2

 Approved Laboratory Science I and II should be a year-long laboratory science, e.g., BIO 101-102 and PHY 201-202.

  CURRICULUM: Computer Science Specialization COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

______

Laboratory Science I

3

3

4

MTH 173

Calculus with Analytic Geometry 5 I

0

5

CSC 201

Computer Science I

4

0

4

16

3

17

1

TOTAL ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

2

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

______

1

Laboratory Science II

3

3

4

MTH 174

Calculus with Analytic Geometry 5 II

0

5

CSC 202

Computer Science II

0

4

12-15 3-5

14-16

Approved Mathematics, Laboratory Science, or Computer Science Elective

3-5

3-5

______

Approved Laboratory Science

3

3

4

HIS 101  or  HIS 121

History of Western Civilization I or  United States History I

3

0

3

1

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

CSC 208

1

Approved Elective

3

0

3

15-17 3-6

16-18

1

______

1,3

______ ______ TOTAL

0-3

______

TOTAL

15-16 3-5

17

Introduction to Discrete Structures

3

0

3

CSC 205

Computer Organization

4

0

4

History of Western Civilization I or  United States History I

3

0

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

13

0

13

1

Approved Mathematics or Laboratory Science Elective

3-5

0-3

3-5

HIS 101  or  HIS 121

______

1,3

Approved Laboratory Science II

3

3

4

______

HIS 102  or  HIS 122

History of Western Civilization II or  United States History II

3

0

3

TOTAL

1

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

1

Approved Elective

3

0

3 16-18

______

______ ______ TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in  Science, Science Specialization

62

01.28.16 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

College Catalog 2016-2017

2

3

Approved Mathematics, Laboratory Science, or Computer Science Elective

3-5

0

3-5

______

3

Approved Elective

3

0

3

HIS 102  or  HIS 122

History of Western Civilization II or  United States History II

3

0

3

2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

______

15-17 3-6

4

______ ______ TOTAL

15-17 0

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Science, Computer Science Specialization

15-17 62

85

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 01.28.16

HIS 102  or  HIS 122

1

 Selection of lab science depends upon the transfer institution selected. Students should consult their advisor for appropriate courses.  Approved Laboratory Science I and II should be a yearlong laboratory science, e.g., BIO 101-102 and CHM 111-112.

1

______

3

 Students must see their advisor for appropriate courses.  Students transferring to VCU should consider taking CSC 295 Introduction to the Theory of Computations this semester.

 

COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

1,7

Approved Laboratory Science I

3

3

4

2

Calculus with  Analytic Geometry I

5

0

5

3

Computer Science Elective

3-4

0

3-4

MTH 173 CSC___ TOTAL

15-17 3

16-18

College Composition II

3

0

3

______

Approved Laboratory Science II

3

3

4

MTH 174

Calculus with Analytic Geometry 5 II

0

5

Approved Elective

0-3

3-4

ENG 112 1,7

4

______ TOTAL

3-4

14-16 3-6

15-17

Vector Calculus

4

0

4

Statistics

3

0

3

History of Western Civilization I or  United States History I

3

0

3

1

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

1

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

16

0

16

MTH 277 MTH 240 HIS 101  or  HIS 121 ______ ______

5

TOTAL 6

______

Approved Mathematics, Laboratory Science,

3-5

0-3

3-5

or Computer Science Elective MTH 287 1

______

86

0

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

12-15 0-5 13-15

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Science, Mathematics Specialization

60

01.28.16 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 2

CURRICULUM: Mathematics Specialization

______

3

TOTAL

2

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

History of Western Civilization II or  United States History II

 Students not prepared for MTH 173 may be required to take  MTH 166 prior to taking MTH 173. MTH 166 does not meet the graduation requirements for the Mathematics Specialization. 3

 Students may take CSC 201 or another CSC programming course. 4

 Approved electives include CSC 202, CSC 205, MTH 285, or another course approved by the student’s advisor. 5

 MTH 240 transfers as an elective for students majoring in mathematics at Virginia Tech and the University of Virginia. At VCU, MTH 240 transfers for a mathematics major if the student takes an additional upper-level statistics course at VCU; in this case, the student will receive credit for both MTH 240 and the upper-level statistics course. 6

 It is expected that most students intending to major in mathematics will take MTH 279, Ordinary Differential Equations, for this elective. For additional elective options, students should consult the list of approved electives in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 7

 Approved Laboratory Science I and II should be a year-long laboratory science, e.g., BIO 101-102 and PHY 201-202.

  CURRICULUM: Mathematics and Science Teacher Preparation COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 101

Orientation to Teacher Preparation

2

0

2

College Composition I

3

0

3

______

Approved Laboratory Science I

3

3

4

MTH 166  or 

Precalculus with Trigonometry or Calculus with Analytic Geometry I

5

0

5

Computer  Science Elective

3-4

0

3-4

ENG 111 1

2

Mathematical Structures

3

0

3

MTH 173

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

CSC ___ TOTAL

16-17 3

17-18

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

______

Approved Laboratory Science II

3

3

4

MTH 240 or  MTH 270 or  MTH 173  or 

Statistics 3-5 or  Applied Calculus or Calculus with Analytic Geometry I or Calculus with Analytic Geometry II

0

3-5

People and the Land: Introduction to Cultural Geography

3

0

3

1

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

12-15 3-5

14-16

3

Approved Mathematics, Laboratory Science, or Computer Science Elective

3-5

3-5

______

Approved Laboratory Science I

3

3

4

HIS 101  or  HIS 121

History of Western Civilization I or United States History I

3

0

3

EDU 200

Introduction to Teaching as a Profession

2

1

MTH 174

2

GEO 210

______ TOTAL ______

1

TOTAL

0-2

0-3

2

3

3-5

0-3

3-5

______

1

Approved Laboratory Science II

3

3

4

HIS 102  or  HIS 122

History of Western Civilization II or United States History II

3

0

3

______

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

ECO 201  or ECO 202 or

Principles of Economics IMacroeconomics or Principles of Economics IIMicroeconomics or Survey of Economics

3

0

3

ECO 120

4

TOTAL

15-17 3-6

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Science – Mathematics and Science Teacher Preparation Specialization

Associate of Science SPECIALIZATIONS:   American Sign Language/Deaf Studies Pre-Social Work Teacher Preparation PURPOSE: The social sciences are concerned with the study of human society and emphasize the role of analysis, experimentation, and the scientific method. The chief academic disciplines of the social sciences are anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, and sociology. The Social Sciences AS degree is designed for those who plan to transfer to a fouryear college or university to complete a bachelor’s degree in the social sciences. The curricula consist of courses in general education (including foreign language, natural science, and social science) typically required in the first two years of a baccalaureate curriculum in the social sciences. Students from the Science AS degree transfer into a wide variety of majors at senior institutions including, but not limited to, the following: 

60

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

College Catalog 2016-2017

Social Sciences

16-18

01.28.16 1

 Students completing the Mathematics and Science Teacher Preparation Specialization with the intention of being a science teacher must check with their transfer institution to determine the appropriate elective. Students completing the Teacher Preparation Specialization in Mathematics and Science with the intention of being a mathematics teacher are recommended to take an approved mathematics elective and are strongly encouraged to contact their transfer institution to determine the appropriate elective.

1

Approved Mathematics or Laboratory Science Elective

1

3

4

13-15

______

 MTH 173-174 are recommended for students planning to major in Physics or Chemistry. Students not prepared for MTH 173 may be required to take MTH 166 prior to taking MTH 173.

  Students should consult with their advisor and transfer institution to determine the best choice for their program.

11-13 5-8 3

2

anthropology

pre-law

history

social work

economics

government/political science

mass communications

sociology

psychology

speech-language pathology

education/Deaf studies

ASL: interpretation/linguistics

  The Social Sciences AS degree lays the foundation for a Bachelor of Science degree in anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, and sociology. The program includes one year of coursework in the same foreign language. The Social Sciences program is designed to provide transfer paths that will match the requirements of senior institutions (four-year colleges and universities); however, senior institutions differ in their requirements, so students are strongly urged to work with

87

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE their assigned advisor and to acquaint themselves with the requirements of the major department in the college or university to which they plan to transfer. Students should understand that the line between the humanities and social sciences is not always clear and that some colleges and universities award BA degrees in what are usually considered the social sciences. Each student admitted to the program is assigned an academic advisor to help plan the appropriate course of studies to transfer to the student’s choice of a fouryear college or university. Students who complete the program generally transfer as juniors. The ASL/Deaf Studies Specialization is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university in a major that requires a background in American Sign Language and Deaf persons as a cultural group. These expanding fields include speech-language pathology, deaf education, ASL instruction, interpretation, interpreter education, linguistics, and Deaf studies (e.g., history, literature, and research). The Pre-Social Work Specialization is designed for students who plan to transfer to Virginia Commonwealth University and major in social work.  This specialization was developed in collaboration with VCU, and an articulation agreement--outlined below--exists for eligible students who transfer to VCU.  Students who pursue a different degree program at VCU will be subject to a reevaluation of transferable credits for their elected course of study.  Students interested in this specialization should meet with the Pre-Social Work program head at Reynolds and are required to do so during their first semester of study. The Teacher Preparation Specialization is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year college or university in a major that requires a background in the social sciences, and who plan to teach at the elementary, middle, or secondary school level. The Teacher Preparation specialization enables the student to participate in two field experiences in area schools. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: The following high school units are strongly recommended: three units of college preparatory mathematics and two years of a foreign language. PRE-SOCIAL WORK ARTICULATION AGREEMENT WITH VCU: The VCU School of Social Work guarantees admission into its BSW program with junior standing to eligible students who have completed requirements for Pre-Social Work specialization for the AS in Social Sciences at Reynolds.  Eligible students are those who meet the following criteria: • • • •

88

Earn an Associate of Science degree in Social Sciences at Reynolds; Earn a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale; Earn an individual grade no lower than B in HMS 100 - Introduction to Human Services and HMS 121 - Basic Counseling Skills I; and Earn an individual grade no lower than a C in all other courses listed for the Pre-Social Work specialization.

NOTE TO PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS: Students who wish to be licensed to teach in Virginia should earn a baccalaureate degree in a liberal arts or science field. Students should consult with their advisor regarding elective choices that match their desired teaching endorsement area(s). While enrolled at the community college, students should prepare for and successfully complete Praxis I, the initial teacher licensure examination. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in the Social Sciences degree will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once.   CURRICULUM: Social Sciences — Associate of Science COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

HIS___

United States History, or African-American History, or Western Civilization, or World Civilization, or any 200-level History Course

3

0

3

Foundations of Contemporary Mathematics or Precalculus I

3

0

3

2

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

3

Foreign Language

4

0

4

MTH 170 or

1

1

MTH 163 ______ ______ TOTAL

14-15 0-2 15

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

HIS___

United States History, or African-American History, or Western Civilization, or World Civilization, or any 200-level History Course

3

0

3

Statistics

3

0

3

Foreign Language

4

0

4

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts or Computer Concepts and Applications

3

0

3

16

0

16

3

0

3

MTH 240

1

3

______ ITE 115  or

4

CSC 155

4

TOTAL ENG___

5

Any 200-Level Literature Course

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 2,6

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

7

Approved Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

8

Approved Elective

3

0

3

______ ______ ______ TOTAL

12

3

13

Any 200-Level Literature Course

3

0

3

2,6

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

7

Approved Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

8

Approved Electives

6

0

6

15

3

16

ENG___

5

______ ______ ______ TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Social Sciences

60

04.21.15 1 

Students should consult with their advisor and preferred transfer institution about which math courses to take.  MTH 163 followed by MTH 240 or MTH 270 are more universally transferable.  Students planning to transfer to VCU may take MTH 170, followed by MTH 240.  Students who intend to major in economics or anthropology at VCU must take MTH 163. 

6

 Degree requirements may be fulfilled by students taking sequential or non-sequential courses in the same or different subject area. Students are advised to check the requirements of their transfer institution. 7

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. NAS and below 100-level sciences do not satisfy this requirement. Students are advised to check the requirements of their transfer institution. 8

A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. For the Social Sciences AS degree, students are recommended to complete six hours in a course or courses designated as having an international focus. Courses having an international focus are identified on the approved general education electives list.

  CURRICULUM: Social Sciences — Associate of Science American Sign Language/Deaf Studies Specialization  COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

SDV 101

Orientation to American Sign Language and Interpreter Education

3

0

3

HIS___

United States History, or African-American History, or Western Civilization, or World Civilization, or any 200-level History Course

3

0

3

Foundations of Contemporary Mathematics or Precalculus I

3

0

3

______

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

ASL 295

Topics in ASL: American Sign Language III

3

0

3

2

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 3

A list of approved foreign language courses is provided in the catalog in the Curriculum Planning and Design section. Students must take the same foreign language through the 102-level. Students who have satisfactorily completed two years of a foreign language in high school may take the Foreign Language Achievement Testing Service (FLATS) test through the testing centers to receive up to 8 credits toward their foreign language requirement. Students who have acquired foreign language CLEP scores should refer to the College Catalog for the acceptable minimum scores for any Reynolds/ VCCS course equivalent.  Students can then apply to Admissions and Records to have the scores evaluated. Some BS programs require intermediate-level foreign language. Many colleges and universities accept American Sign Language as a foreign language credit. Students should consult with their transfer institution about language requirements. 4

 Students should consult with their advisor and transfer institution about the computer literacy course to take. Students who have good backgrounds in computers may petition for credit by examination.

MTH 170 or

1

1

MTH 163

2

TOTAL

15-16 0-2 16

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

HIS___

United States History, or African-American History, or Western Civilization, or World Civilization, or any 200-level History Course

3

0

3

Statistics

3

0

3

Topics in ASL: American Sign Language IV

3

0

3

5

 Students may take any 200-level LITERATURE course. ENG 215 and 217 do NOT satisfy this literature requirement. For transfer purposes, students should consult with their advisor and transfer institution about their literature selections.

College Catalog 2016-2017

MTH 240 ASL 295

1

89

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 3

TOTAL

15

0

15

Any 200-Level Literature Course

3

0

3

2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

______

6

Approved Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

ASL 125

History and Culture of the Deaf Community

3

0

3

12

3

13

Any 200-Level Literature Course

3

0

3

2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

______

6

Approved Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

ASL 220

Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English

3

0

3

MTH 170

ASL 225

Literature of the U.S. Deaf Community

3

0

3

or

ENG___

5

______

TOTAL ENG___

5

______

TOTAL

0

3

purposes, students should consult with their advisor and transfer institution about their literature selections.

4 ITE 115  or Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts 4 CSC 155 or Computer Concepts and Applications

6

CURRICULUM: Social Sciences — Associate of Science Pre-Social Work Specialization COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

College Success Skills

1

0

1

Introduction to Human Services

3

0

3

Foundations of Contemporary Mathematics

3

0

3

Principles of Psychology

3

0

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

SDV 100 1

or

MTH 163 15

3

Precalculus I

16

04.21.15 1

 Students should consult with their advisor and preferred transfer institution about which math course to take. MTH 163 followed by MTH 240 or MTH 270 are more universally transferable.  Students planning to transfer to VCU may take MTH 170, followed by MTH 240.  Students who intend to major in economics or anthropology at VCU must take MTH 163.  2

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. To avoid transfer problems, students should carefully select courses to fulfill elective requirements with the assistance of their advisors and upon an investigation of the transfer requirements of the institution to which transfer is contemplated. 3

 ASL 295 - ASL III and ASL 295 - ASL IV satisfy the one-year foreign language requirement. Completion of ASL 101 and ASL 102 with a grade of “C” or higher satisfies the prerequisites for ASL 295 - ASL III. 4

 Students should consult their advisor and transfer institution about the computer literacy course to take.  Students may take any 200-level LITERATURE course. ENG 215 and 217 do NOT satisfy this literature requirement. For transfer

90

 

HMS 100

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Social Sciences, 60 ASL/Deaf Studies Specialization

5

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. NAS and below 100-level sciences do not satisfy this requirement. Students are advised to check the requirements of their transfer institution.

PSY 200 2

______ TOTAL

13-14 0-2 14

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

HMS 121

Basic Counseling Skills I

3

0

3

MTH 240

Statistics

3

0

3

PSY 230

Developmental Psychology

3

0

3

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts or Computer Concepts and Applications

3

0

3

15

0

15

General Biology I

3

3

4

Advanced Composition

3

0

3

History Elective

3

0

3

Principles of Sociology

3

0

3

Foreign Language

3-4

0

3-4

1

3

ITE 115 or  CSC 155

3

TOTAL BIO 101 ENG 210 HIS ___

2

SOC 200 4

______ TOTAL BIO 102

2

ENG ___ HIS ___ 5

PHI 111

2

15-16 3

16-17

General Biology II

3

3

4

Any 200-Level Literature Course

3

0

3

History Elective

3

0

3

Logic I or

3

0

3

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS or

Ethics

PHI 220

2

MTH 163

5

SOC 210

Survey of Physical and Cultural Anthropology

TOTAL

3

0

3

15

3

16

or Precalculus I

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

4

Foreign Language

4

0

4

______ ______ TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Social Sciences, 61 Pre-Social Work Specialization

15-16 0-2 16

ENG 112 1

HIS___ 08.20.15 1

 Students must complete a social work-designated section with a minimum grade of "B."

MTH 240

2

4



A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

______

ITE 115 or  CSC 155

5

3

College Composition II

3

0

3

United States History, or African-American History, or Western Civilization, or World Civilization

3

0

3

Statistics

3

0

3

Foreign Language

4

0

4

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts or Computer Concepts and Applications

3

0

3

16

 Students should consult their advisor and transfer institution about the computer literacy course to take.

TOTAL

0

16

4

ENG___6

Any 200-Level English Literature 3 Course

0

3

ECO 201 or  ECO 202 or

Principles of Economics IMacroeconomics or Principles of Economics IIMicroeconomics or Survey of Economics

3

0

3

______

Approved Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

EDU 200

Introduction to Teaching as a Profession

2

2

3

11

5

13

Any 200-Level English Literature 3 Course

0

3

People and the Land: Introduction to Cultural Geography

3

0

3

8

Approved Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

3

Approved Elective

3

0

3

3

Approved Elective

3

0

3

15

3

16

 A list of approved foreign language courses is provided in the catalog in the Curriculum Planning and Design section. Students must take a foreign language course, either at an introductory-level (101 or 102) or intermediate-level (201 or 202). An American Sign Language  (ASL) course may be taken to satisfy the foreign language requirement. Students who have satisfactorily completed two years of a foreign language in high school may take the Foreign Language Achievement Testing Service (FLATS) test through the testing centers to demonstrate mastery at an introductory-level (101 or 102)  Students who have acquired foreign language CLEP scores should refer to the College Catalog for the acceptable minimum scores for any Reynolds/VCCS course equivalent. Students can then apply to Admissions and Records to have the scores evaluated for competence through an introductory-level.  Students who demonstrate mastery through the intermediatelevel should discuss having credits accepted and/or substituting an approved elective in place of the foreign language course.

ECO 120

8

TOTAL ENG___

 Students may also take PHI 225 or PHI 226 to meet this requirement.

CURRICULUM: Social Sciences — Associate of Science Teacher Preparation Specialization

______ ______

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

SDV 101

Orientation to Teacher Preparation

2

0

2

United States History, or African-American History, or Western Civilization, or World Civilization

3

0

3

Foundations of Contemporary Mathematics

3

1

MTH 170 or

2

College Catalog 2016-2017

6

GEO 210

5

HIS___

7

______ TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AS Degree in Social Sciences, 61 Teacher Preparation Specialization 04.21.15 1

0

3

 Students are recommended to take one semester of United States, African-American, or Virginia History, and one semester of Western or World Civilization.

91

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 2

Students should consult with their advisor and preferred transfer institution about which math course to take. MTH 163 followed by MTH 240 or MTH 270 are more universally transferable.  Students planning to transfer to VCU may take MTH 170, followed by MTH 240.  Students who intend to major in economics or anthropology at VCU must take MTH 163.  3

A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. To avoid transfer problems, students should carefully select courses to fulfill elective requirements with the assistance of their advisors and upon an investigation of the transfer requirements of the institution to which transfer is contemplated. 4

Students must take the same foreign language through the 102-level. Students who have satisfactorily completed two years of a foreign language in high school may take the Foreign Language Achievement Testing Service (FLATS) through the testing centers to receive up to 8 credits toward their foreign language requirement. Students who have acquired foreign language CLEP scores should refer to the College Catalog for the acceptable minimum scores for any Reynolds/VCCS course equivalent.  Students can then apply to Admissions and Records to have the scores evaluated.  Some BS programs require intermediate-level foreign language. Many colleges and universities accept American Sign Language as a foreign language credit. Students should consult their transfer institution about language requirements.  5

 Students should consult with their advisor and transfer institution about the computer literacy course to take. Students who have good backgrounds in computers may petition for credit by examination. 6

 Students may take any 200-level LITERATURE course. ENG 215 and 217 do NOT satisfy this literature requirement. For transfer purposes, students should consult with their advisor and transfer institution about their literature selections. 7

Students should consult with their advisor and transfer institution to determine the best choice for their program. 8

A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. Future elementary teachers are recommended to take one semester of physical science and one semester of biological science. NAS and below 100-level sciences do not satisfy this requirement. Students are advised to check the requirements of their transfer institution.

92

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

Associate Degrees & Certificates

College Catalog 2016-2017

93

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE  

BUS 100

Introduction to Business

3

0

3

Accounting

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

Associate of Applied Science

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

College Success Skills

1

0

1

16

0

16

PURPOSE: The rapid expansion of business and industry in Virginia has created a large, steady demand for qualified personnel to assist in the preparation and interpretation of accounting and financial information. The AAS degree in Accounting is designed for persons who are seeking their first full-time employment in the accounting field immediately upon completion of the curriculum. In addition, the program is designed for persons presently employed in accounting who desire to increase their knowledge and update their skills.

MTH 120 SDV 100 TOTAL

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ACC 211

Principles of Accounting I

3

94

0

3

3

0

3

ACC 212

Principles of Accounting II

3

0

3

Computerized Accounting

3

0

3

___ ___

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

ECO 201

Principles of Economics I – Macroeconomics

3

0

3

BUS 220

Introduction to Business Statistics

3

0

3

18

0

18

TOTAL

PROGRAM NOTES: The Accounting AAS degree requires that students have the following competencies: (1) competency in Math Essentials MTE 1-3 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent, and (2) competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3.

CURRICULUM:

Small Business Taxes

2

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by successfully passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once.

ACC 134 ACC 215

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The AAS degree in Accounting prepares graduates to function in responsible paraprofessional positions in the current employment market. Occupational objectives include Accounting Assistant, Senior Accounting Clerk, Bookkeeper, Junior Accountant, Tax Specialist, Fiscal Technician, and Internal Auditor.

The purpose of the associate of applied science (AAS) degree curriculum is to prepare students for immediate employment upon graduation. Transfer opportunities for AAS degrees, if existing, are usually very specific in nature. Students may, however, substitute some courses in the AAS degree curriculum with courses that generally transfer to senior institutions. Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university to major in Accounting upon completion of a degree from Reynolds should enroll in the Business Administration AS transfer program. Students considering transfer should consult their faculty advisor at the earliest possible date for further guidance and are advised to get assurances in writing in advance from the institution to which they wish to transfer.

1

ACC 217

Financial Statement Analysis

3

0

3

ACC 221

Intermediate Accounting I

3

0

3

ACC 231

Cost Accounting I

3

0

3

BUS 240

Introduction to Business Law

3

0

3

AST 205

Business Communications

3

0

3

ITE 140

Spreadsheet Software

3

0

3

18

0

18

TOTAL ACC 222

Intermediate Accounting II

3

0

3

ACC 241

Auditing I

3

0

3

ACC 261

Principles of Federal Taxation I

3

0

3

ACC 240

Fraud Examination

3

0

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

2

___ ___ TOTAL

12-13 0-2 13

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Accounting

 

 

65

03.10.15 1

 Students may substitute MTH 163 for MTH 120 as a transfer option. 2

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

Accounting Certificate PURPOSE: The rapid expansion of business and industry in Virginia has created a large, steady demand for qualified

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS personnel to assist in the preparation and interpretation of accounting and financial information. The certificate in Accounting is designed for persons who are seeking their first full-time employment in the accounting field immediately upon completion of the curriculum. In addition, the program is designed for persons presently employed in accounting who desire to increase their knowledge and update their skills.

ACC 215

Computerized Accounting

3

0

3

ECO 201

Principles of Economics I – Macroeconomics

3

0

3

12

0

12

ACC 198

Seminar and Project: Accounting 3 Capstone

0

3

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The certificate in Accounting prepares graduates for employment in any of the following occupations: Accounts Receivable Clerk, Accounts Payable Clerk, Payroll Clerk, Inventory Clerk, and other clerical positions in accounting.

AST 205

Business Communications

3

0

3

ACC 212

Principles of Accounting II

3

0

3

ITE 140

Spreadsheet Software

3

0

3

TOTAL

12

0

12

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

Total Minimum Credits for Certificate in  Accounting

 

 

34

PROGRAM NOTES: The Accounting Certificate requires that students have the following competencies: (1) competency in Math Essentials MTE 1-3 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent, and (2) competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Students should consult with their faculty advisor in choosing electives or course substitutions. All program electives and course substitutions must be approved in writing by the Accounting program head. The Accounting Certificate may transfer at the student’s option directly into the Accounting AAS degree. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_202.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ACC 117

Essentials of Accounting

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

10

0

10

TOTAL ACC 134

Small Business Taxes

3

0

3

ACC 211

Principles of Accounting I

3

0

3

College Catalog 2016-2017

TOTAL 1

03.10.15 1

 Prerequisites are ACC 117, Essentials of Accounting, and ACC 211 with a grade of “C” or higher.

Administration of Justice Associate of Applied Science PURPOSE: The Administration of Justice program is for students anticipating a career in the justice system, as well as for persons already employed in the justice system who want to enhance their professional standing and update their skills. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The Administration of Justice program is designed for students who are planning careers in law enforcement, corrections (juvenile and adult), or employment in related agencies. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: All new students should take the English and mathematics placement tests immediately after applying. The following high school units are strongly recommended for the Administration of Justice program: four units of English, three units of college preparatory mathematics, one unit of laboratory science, and two units of foreign language. There are no physical requirements such as height, weight, eyesight, and physical dexterity; however, the student should understand that there may be such requirements for employment in criminal justice agencies. The purpose of the Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree curriculum is to prepare students for immediate employment upon graduation. Four-year college and university transfer opportunities for AAS degrees, if existing, are usually very specific in nature. Reynolds has formal transfer articulation agreements with four-year institutions that enable graduates who qualify to transfer courses completed in the AAS degree. These transfer articulation agreements are subject to change or expiration. In addition, students may substitute some courses in the AAS degree curriculum with courses that typically transfer to senior

95

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE institutions. Students interested in transferring in general or transferring under a formal transfer articulation agreement should consult with their faculty advisor upon program entry for further guidance. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

College Success Skills

1

0

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

ADJ 100

Survey of Criminal Justice

3

0

3

ADJ 130

Introduction to Criminal Law

3

0

3

ADJ 105

The Juvenile Justice System

3

0

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-2

0-4 2

1

TOTAL

13-15 0-4 15

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

ADJ 212

Criminal Law, Evidence, and Procedures I

3

0

3

ADJ 201

Criminology

3

0

3

ADJ 128

Patrol Administration and Operations

3

0

3

1,2

Approved Mathematics or Science Elective

3

0

3

1

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

18

0

18

Approved ADJ Elective

3

0

3

Approved ADJ Elective

3

0

3

Ethics

3

0

3

1

200-Level Literature Course

3

0

3

3

Coordinated Internship

0

15

3

Approved Mathematics or Science Elective

3

0

3

15

15

18

___ ___ ___ ___ TOTAL

2

ADJ___

ADJ ___

2

PHI 220 ENG ___ ADJ 290

1,2

___ __ TOTAL

ADJ 116

Special Enforcement Topics

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

CST 100

Principles of Public Speaking

3

0

3

Approved Elective

3

0

3

2

___ ___

96

Approved Elective

TOTAL

3

0

3

15

0

15

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Administration of Justice

66

03.10.15 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 2

SDV 100

___ ___

2

___ ___

 Courses must be approved in advance by the Administration of Justice program head. 3

 Students not employed in a criminal justice agency will be required to complete an internship with an approved criminal justice agency. Students currently employed in a criminal justice agency may request advanced standing credit for the internship.

American Sign Language-English Interpretation Associate of Applied Science PURPOSE: The degree in American Sign Language (ASL)-English Interpretation is designed to prepare individuals for a career in sign language interpretation. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: A majority of full-time ASL -English interpretation positions in the Commonwealth are found in the K-12 public school setting. The minimum requirement to work as an ASL-English interpreter in the K-12 setting in Virginia is a VQAS Level III, an EIPA of 3.5 or higher, or National Interpreting Certificate (NIC) certification. Those interpreters who attain NIC certification may also consider freelance and contract interpreting opportunities, including the expanding fields of video relay service (VRS) and video remote interpreting (VRI), which both utilize interactive video technology via the Internet. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: ASL-English Interpretation is a twoyear, full-time course of study that enrolls new students annually to begin coursework during the spring or summer semester with programmatic content provided year-round until completion. Candidates for admission to the program must provide evidence of fluency in both English and ASL. Fluency in English is demonstrated by placement into ENG 111. Fluency in ASL is demonstrated by completion of the American Sign Language Career Studies Certificate. Fluency in ASL may also be demonstrated through a diagnostic interview with the American Sign Language and Interpreter Education (ASL&IE) coordinator. Successful completion of the 3-step NIC process results in national certification as an ASL-English Interpreter, which may be maintained through the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (RID) via continuing education. As of July 1, 2012, individuals

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS are required to have a bachelor’s degree, or equivalent, as determined by the National Council on Interpreting (NCI), in order to sit for the NIC evaluation. For more information, please contact the ASL&IE coordinator regarding alternative pathways to certification (i.e., without a bachelor's degree). For more information on the NIC, please visit www.rid.org.

INT 134 TOTAL

1

ASL-to-English Interpretation II

2

2

3

INT 234

1

English-to-ASL Interpretation II

2

2

3

ASL 225

Literature of the U.S. Deaf Community

3

0

3

10

4

12

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

Interpreter Assessment Preparation

3

0

3

6

0

6

Summer, Year 2 ITE 115 2

INT 280 TOTAL

Fall, Year 2 Interpreting ASL in Safe Settings 3

0

3

3

Personal Wellness Elective

1

0

1

4

ASL or INT Elective

3

0

3

Dialogic Interpretation I

3

0

3

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

13

0

13

______

ASL___ or

4

INT___

INT 250

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once.

Spring, Year 2

INT 105

Interpreting Foundations I (English)

4

0

4

INT 106

Interpreting Foundations II (ASL)

4

0

4

9

0

9

Fall, Year 1 ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

INT 107

Translation Skills

4

0

4

ASL-to-English Interpretation I

2

2

3

College Catalog 2016-2017

0

12

3

3

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

4

ASL or INT Elective

3

0

3

Principles of  Public Speaking

3

0

3

TOTAL

9

12

12

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in  ASL-English Interpretation 

 

 

65

______

4

INT___

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE. 1

1

ASL-English Interpreter Internship

ASL___ or

0

INT 133

6

INT 290

CST 100

Summer, Year 1

TOTAL

5

TOTAL

CURRICULUM:

1

13 3

TOTAL

Contact RID for NIC fees; contact VDDHH for VQAS fees; contact Boys' Town for EIPA fees

College Success Skills

4 0

INT 233

$400 first semester; $200 for all other semesters

SDV 100

11 3

INT 237

TITLE

3

Interpreting: An Introduction to the Profession

MTH 120

COURSE

2

2

INT 130

FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS:

Certification/Testing Fees

2

Spring, Year 1

As part of the ASL-English Interpretation AAS curriculum, the student must receive a passing score on either the VQAS, EIPA, or NIC written assessment portion and “C” or higher in INT 130 prior to initiating INT 280, Interpreter Assessment Preparation. It is typical for students to sit for the VQAS or EIPA performance exam during the fall semester, year 2. Initiation of INT 290, ASLEnglish Interpretation Internship, during the spring of year 2 is typical. The Virginia Quality Assurance Screening (VQAS) is a state screening, valid for three years by which time the interpreter must be screened again or the credential is no longer valid. For more information on the VQAS, please visit http:// www.vddhh.org  or contact the Virginia Department for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (VDDHH) at 1-800-552-7917 [V/TTY]. The Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment (EIPA) is administered by Boys’ Town. For more information, please visit www.classroominterpreting.org

Books and Supplies        

English-to-ASL Interpretation I

1

7

03.10.15 1

 INT 133-134 and INT 233-234 are course tandems that are designed to be taken concurrently. 2

 Successful completion of INT 130 with "C" or higher and successful completion of either the VQAS written test or EIPA written test, typically as part of INT 130, are required prior to enrolling in INT 280, Interpreter Assessment Preparation.

97

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 3

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 4

 Students should consult with the ASL&IE coordinator to select from various ASL (American Sign Language) and INT (Interpreter Education) elective offerings, which vary from semester to semester. 5

 Students who provide documentation from a receiving institution that supports selection of a different course to satisfy the MTH 120 requirement may substitute that course, pending ASL&IE coordinator approval. Students wishing to transfer to a four-year institution may substitute MTH 170 or MTH 163 for MTH 120.  6

 In order to be placed in an internship (INT 290, spring year 2), the student must sit for and be awarded an interpreting credential (e.g., VQAS level, EIPA award, or NIC certification) or demonstrate acceptable proficiency on a mock ASL-English Interpreter assessment approved by the ASL&IE coordinator. 7

 Students who provide documentation from a receiving institution that supports selection of a different course to satisfy the CST requirement may substitute that course, pending ASL&IE coordinator approval.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to general college admission, applicants shall have (1) completed placement testing and (2) met with their advisor to establish a planned course of study prior to being allowed to register for courses. Satisfactory completion of the following high school units or their equivalent, at a minimum, is strongly recommended: four units of English, one unit of laboratory science (preferably physical science), one unit of social studies, and two units of mathematics (one unit of algebra and one unit of geometry). COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the Reynolds computer competency requirement by successfully completing CSC 155 or ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the Reynolds computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for CSC 155 or ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM: All Specializations COURSE

DRF 231

1

CSC 155 or ITE 115

Associate of Applied Science SPECIALIZATIONS: Contemporary Technology for Design Building Construction Management Geospatial and Environmental  Engineering Technologies

Computer-Aided Drafting I

2

2

3

Computer Concepts and Applications or Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

5

2

6

TOTAL Fall, Year 1

PURPOSE: The Architectural and Engineering Technology degree is designed to develop qualified technicians for the field of engineering. The technician serves as an important link between the engineering professional and the skilled tradesperson in the design, construction, and operation of engineering projects.

98

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Summer

Architectural and Engineering Technology

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: This program will provide graduates with the skills and specialized knowledge for employment as highly-trained architectural draftspersons; managers for the construction industry; technicians for construction projects, such as highway, bridge, dam, commercial, and residential construction; and other related occupations in a highly active industry. Employment opportunities are numerous from the planning stage through project completion and inspection in the following areas: construction industry in private enterprise, government-related business, consulting, and other engineering-related activities. Employment opportunities for graduates specializing in Geospatial and Environmental Engineering Technologies include entry-level positions as GIS analysts, GPS survey technicians, CADD/GIS technicians, cartographers, and support technicians, GIS-based real estate technicians, and any related support service position that utilizes GIS/GPS technology.

TITLE

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

CIV 171

Surveying I

2

3

3

MTH 115

Technical Mathematics I

3

0

3

ARC 121

Architectural Drafting I

2

3

3

ARC 131

Materials and Methods of Construction I

3

0

3

DRF 232

Computer-Aided Drafting II

2

2

2

13

8

16

TOTAL   CURRICULUM: Contemporary Technology for Design COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Spring, Year 1

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS BLD 103

Principles of Residential Building 3 Construction Inspection

0

3

DRF 238

Computer-Aided Modeling and Rendering I

2

2

3

ARC 122

Architectural Drafting II

2

3

3

ARC 132

Materials and Methods of Construction II

3

0

3

ARC 221

Architecture CAD Applications Software I

2

2

3

TOTAL

BLD 101

Construction Management I

TOTAL

13

5-6

15

College Composition I

3

0

3

BLD 103

Principles of Residential Building 3 Construction Inspection

0

3

ARC 241

Building Mechanical Systems

3

0

3

BLD 210

Building Structures

3

0

3

Architectural CAD Applications Software I

2

2

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

12

7

15

ARC 221 2

College Composition I

3

0

3

_______

BLD 210

Building Structures

3

0

3

TOTAL

ARC 241

Building Mechanical Systems

3

0

3

Spring, Year 2

BLD 200

Sustainable Construction

3

0

3

BLD 231

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

BLD 247

TOTAL

3

ENG 111

ENG 111

2

0

Fall, Year 2

Fall, Year 2

_______

3

12-13 0-2 13

_______

Spring, Year 2

3

ARC 201

14-15 2-4

16

Construction Estimating

3

0

3

Construction Planning and Scheduling

3

0

3

Approved Technical Elective

2-3

0-3

3

History of Modern Architecture

3

0

3

ARC 242

Building Electrical Systems

3

0

3

BLD 231

Construction Estimating

3

0

3

ARC 201

History of Modern Architecture

3

0

3

ARC 222

Architectural CAD Applications Software II

2

2

3

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

 

14

2

15

CURRICULUM: Geospatial and Environmental Engineering  Technologies Specialization

_______

2

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in  Architectural and Engineering Technology,  Contemporary Technology  for Design Specialization

65

TOTAL

11-12 0-3 12

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in  Architectural and Engineering Technology,  Building Construction Management Specialization

COURSE

TITLE

65

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Spring, Year 1

    CURRICULUM: Building Construction Management  Specialization COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Spring, Year 1 GIS 200 or CIV 256

Geographical Information Systems I or Global Positioning Systems for Land Surveying

2

2

3

 

 

 

2

3

3

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

ARC 122

Architectural Drafting II

2

3

3

ARC 132

Materials and Methods of Construction II

3

0

3

_______

2

College Catalog 2016-2017

GIS 200

Geographical Information Systems I

2

2

3

DRF 238

Computer-Aided Modeling and Rendering I

2

2

3

CIV 256

Global Positioning Systems for Land Surveying

2

3

3

ARC 132

Materials and Methods of Construction II

3

0

3

BLD 247

Construction Planning and Scheduling

3

0

3

12

7

15

TOTAL Fall, Year 2 ENG 111

College Composition

3

0

3

GIS 201

Geographical Information Systems II

2

2

3

BLD 200

Sustainable Construction

3

0

3

99

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE BLD 210 _______

2

Building Structures

3

0

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

TOTAL

11-12 2-4

13

Spring, Year 2 BLD 231

Construction Estimating

3

0

3

ARC 122

Architectural Drafting II

2

3

3

Utilizing Surveying Software

2

3

3

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

History of Modern Architecture

3

0

3

13

6

15

CIV 270 _______ ARC 201

2

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in  Architectural 65 and Engineering Technology,  Geospatial and Environmental Engineering Technologies Specialization





The general program provides education regarding the general theory and operation of current automotive products. The program of instruction is not manufacturerspecific. The General Motors Automotive Service Educational Program (GM ASEP) provides education focused exclusively on current GM products. The GM ASEP program allows students to alternate between going to college and working at a GM dealership for approximately two years, leading to the AAS degree. Students will receive both college credit and GM certification for each AUT course successfully completed in the AAS degree.  Students enrolled in the GM ASEP option are required to enroll in the AAS degree and be employed at a GM dealership or AC Delco shop to meet the manufacturer's requirements for certification.  Students are encouraged to meet with a GM ASEP instructor prior to enrolling in the program to discuss requirements and employment assistance, and to receive specific course codes required to enroll in the GM ASEP program.

2

The two options of the Automotive Technology AAS degree described above are certified by the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence, National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (ASE/NATEF), ensuring that training meets or exceeds industry standards. The Reynolds Automotive Technology AAS degree with its two options is designed to prepare students for the ASE certification.

3

Automotive course credit may be granted through credit by ABLE for some courses.  Students should see the Automotive Technology program head for an approved list of course substitutions for successful completion of ASE certifications.

02.02.16 1

 Students with experience in computer–aided drafting may petition the program head to earn credit by ABLE for this course.  A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.  Approved technical electives are ARC 222, CIV 295, CIV 256,  GIS 201, and GOL 105.

 

Automotive Technology Associate of Applied Science PROGRAMS OFFERED: General Automotive and GM ASEP PURPOSE: This curriculum is designed to prepare individuals for employment in the automotive repair industry or to serve the continuing education needs of the automotive technician working in the field.

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

AUT 101

Introduction to Automotive Systems

2

2

3

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Automotive Dealership Technician, Safety Inspector, Service Manager, Parts Specialist, Service Writer, and Independent Automotive Technician

AUT 241

Automotive Electricity I

2

3

3

AUT 265

Automotive Braking Systems

2

3

3

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

MTH 103

Applied Technical Mathematics

3

0

3

WEL 120

Fundamentals of Welding

1

3

2

PROGRAM NOTES: Students are required to meet with the Automotive Technology program head before registering for the first semester of study.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

11

11

15

Students in the Automotive AAS degree may pursue one of two program options: the general program or GM ASEP. Following are brief descriptions of each option:

100

TOTAL AUT 111

Automotive Engines

3

3

4

AUT 242

Automotive Electricity II

2

3

3

AUT 266

Automotive Alignment, Suspension, and Steering

1

6

3

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AUT 254 -- Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles (4 cr.)

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

ENG 111  or  ENG 137

College Composition I or Communication Processes I

3

0

3

Cooperative Education in Automotive or Automotive Vehicle Inspection

0

10

2

DLS 126 -- Diesel Engine Reconditioning (6 cr.)

1

2

2

DSL 131 -- Diesel Fuel Systems and Tune-up (4 cr.)

2

AUT 197 or AUT 136 TOTAL

AUT 256 -- Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (4 cr.) AUT 293 -- Studies in Automotive:  Automotive Electronic Guidance Control Systems (3 cr.)

12-13 14-2218

DSL 143 -- Diesel Truck Electrical Systems (4 cr.)

AUT 126

Auto Fuel and Ignition Systems

4

3

5

DSL 150 -- Mobile Hydraulics and Pneumatics (3 cr.)

AUT 178

Automotive Final Drive and Manual Transmission Systems

3

3

4

DSL 152 -- Diesel Power Trains, Chassis, and Suspension (4 cr.)

Cooperative Education in Automotive

0

10

2

Automotive Climate Control

3

3

4

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

13

19

18

AUT 197

2

AUT 236 1

___ ___ TOTAL

DSL 160 -- Air Brake Systems (3 cr.) DSL 176 -- Transportation Air Conditioning (2 cr.) WEL 130 -- Inert Gas Welding (3 cr.) WEL 160 -- Gas Metal Arc Welding (MIG and FCAW) (3 cr.) BUS 100 -- Introduction to Business (3 cr.) BUS 200 -- Principles of Management (3 cr.)

AUT 251

Automatic Transmissions

3

3

4

AUT 165

Auto Diagnosis and Tune-Up

1

3

2

BUS 201 -- Organizational Behavior (3 cr.) CST 110 -- Introduction to Speech Communication (3 cr.)

AUT 245

Automotive Electronics

3

3

4

2

Cooperative Education in Automotive

0

10

2

1

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

1

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

AUT 297 ___ ___ ___ ___ TOTAL

10-11 19-21 16

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in  Automotive Technology

67

02.02.16 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 2

 In situations where a student is already employed, following is a list of approved courses that can be substituted for AUT 197 and AUT 297: AUT 136 -- Automotive Vehicle Inspection (2 cr.) AUT 193 -- Studies in Automotive:  Automotive Electronic Safety Control Systems (3 cr.) AUT 230 -- Introduction to Alternative Fuels and Hybrid Vehicles (3 cr.) AUT 243 -- Automotive Control Electronics (4 cr.) AUT 253 -- Electric Vehicles (4 cr.)

College Catalog 2016-2017

Automotive Technology Certificate PURPOSE: The curriculum is designed to meet the need for educated automotive technicians in all areas of the automotive industry. The program will provide students with experience in the maintenance and repair of a wide variety of automobiles, as well as light to medium duty trucks. Program graduates will receive instruction in the basic skills and sufficient hands-on experience to be able to apply that learning to practical, everyday shop situations. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Auto Mechanic, State Safety Inspector, Service Advisor, Maintenance Technician, Parts Clerk, and Service Writer ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students are required to meet with the program head either before registering for their first semester or early in their first semester of study. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by successfully passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once.

101

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_902.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

WEL 120

Fundamentals of Welding

1

3

2

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

AUT 111

Automotive Engines I

3

3

4

AUT 265

Automotive Braking Systems

2

3

3

AUT 241

Automotive Electricity I

2

3

3

ENG 111 or  ENG 137

College Composition I or Communication Processes I

3

0

3

12

12

16

TOTAL AUT 242

Automotive Electricity II

2

3

3

AUT 236

Automotive Climate Control

3

3

4

AUT 266

Automotive Alignment, Suspension, and Steering

1

6

3

___ ___

General Education Elective

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

12

12

16

1

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Certificate in  Automotive Technology

32

03.11.15 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

Culinary Arts Associate of Applied Science SPECIALIZATIONS:  Culinary Arts Pastry Arts Culinary Management PURPOSE: The Culinary Arts program provides a comprehensive occupational-technical education and is intended to lead to employment as a culinarian within a variety of culinary, food service, and retail paths. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The Culinary Arts specialization prepares graduates to enter kitchens as professional cooks in hotels, resorts, restaurants, catering operations, and a variety of retail businesses. The Culinary Management specialization

102

prepares students to enter kitchens as entry-level supervisors and managers in hotels, resorts, restaurants, catering operations, and a variety of retail businesses. The Pastry Arts specialization prepares students to enter kitchens as professional pastry cooks in hotels, resorts, restaurants, catering operations, and a variety of businesses, while also preparing students interested in opening their own pastry facility or business. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: The Culinary Arts AAS degree requires that students have the following competencies: (1) competency in Math Essentials MTE 1-3 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent, and (2) competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of a collegelevel composition course. Students needing to complete developmental studies courses in English or mathematics may take those courses concurrently with HRI courses, if approved by the program head. Faculty provide advising to enhance student success. All students wishing to enroll in Culinary Arts must attend an advising session. Once enrolled, students must meet with their advisor every semester to review their scheduling strategy and status toward graduation. Information about advising and enrolling in classes is available on the Culinary Arts Admissions page on Reynolds.edu.  Students who earn a final grade lower than “C” in any HRI course must obtain permission from their advisor to continue the major in Culinary Arts. Students will be required to repeat courses in their major when grades lower than “C” are earned. Exceptions must be approved in writing by the program head. The competency-based nature of the curriculum allows students with previous educational studies or training experience to be evaluated for advanced standing. Students who believe they are eligible for such consideration are required to meet with their advisor to discuss eligibility for evaluation and possible advanced standing. The purpose of the associate of applied science (AAS) degree curriculum is to prepare students for immediate employment upon graduation. Four-year college and university transfer opportunities for associate of applied science degrees, if existing, are usually very specific in nature. Students may, however, substitute some courses in the AAS degree curriculum with courses that generally transfer to senior institutions. Students should consult their advisor at the earliest possible date for further guidance and are advised to get assurances in writing in advance from the institution to which they wish to transfer. ACCREDITATION: The Culinary Arts Associate of Applied Science degree is accredited by the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation Accrediting Commission (ACFEFAC). Students who graduate from our Culinary Arts Associate of Applied Science degree in Culinary Arts and are American Culinary Federation (ACF) members at the time of graduation are eligible for free ACF certification as a Certified Culinarian® (CC®). Students who are not ACF members may still earn their Certified Culinarian® (CC®) credential for a fee set by the ACFEFAC.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Graduates who use this benefit have an advantage when seeking employment, because certification is representative of having the knowledge and skills to be successful.

TOTAL HRI 226

CULINARY APPRENTICESHIP: The American Culinary Federation (ACF) offers a three-year apprenticeship program. Reynolds does not administer the apprenticeship, but does provide the educational component of the program. Interested parties should contact the ACF Virginia Chefs Association at vachefs.org for further information. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing HRI 159.

___ ___

8

11

12

Leadership and Kitchen Management

2

0

2

HRI 237

Current Issues and Environmental Responsibilities in the Hospitality Industry

2

0

2

HRI 159

Introduction to Hospitality Industry Computer Systems

2

2

3

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

2

TOTAL

CURRICULUM SEQUENCE: The curriculum sequences illustrated below are examples of how courses may be completed. For complete information, visit  the ACF Apprentice Sequence page on Reynolds.edu.  Many students are academically prepared and disciplined enough to earn the Culinary Arts Associate of Applied Science degree in an accelerated manner. A fast-track, 15-month schedule may be viewed on the  ACF Apprentice Sequence page at Reynolds.edu. Due to the accelerated pace and intensive workload, students should carefully consider this scheduling option prior to enrolling. Students must meet with the program head and receive approval for entry into this track; college transfer credit and prior related work experience are required.

9

2

10

HRI 251

Food and Beverage Cost Control I

3

0

3

HRI 220

Meat, Seafood, and Poultry Preparation

2

3

3

HRI 145

Garde Manger

2

3

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

10

6

12

2

___ ___ TOTAL

REQUIRED UNIFORMS AND TOOLKITS: Students enrolled in HRI courses must wear an approved uniform and possess an approved toolkit for HRI courses. Specifications may be obtained on the Uniforms and Culinary Arts Labs page at Reynolds.edu or from the program head. 

HRI 134

Food and Beverage Service Management

2

3

3

HRI 206

International Cuisine

2

3

3

HRI 207

American Regional Cuisine

2

3

3

HRI 224

Recipe and Menu Management

3

0

3

TOTAL

9

9

12

HRI 190

Coordinated Internship

0

15

3

HRI 287

Contemporary Culinary Artistry and Innovation

1

2

2

HLT 100

First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

2

0

2

Supervised Study: Capstone Study in Culinary Arts

1

4

2

4

21

9

CURRICULUM: Culinary Arts Specialization COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

HRI 299

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

TOTAL

HRI 106

Principles of Culinary Arts I

2

3

3

HRI 115

Food Service Managers Sanitation Certification

1

0

1

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Culinary Arts, Culinary Arts Specialization

MTH 120

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

 

Orientation to Culinary and Pastry Arts

2

0

2

CURRICULUM: Pastry Arts Specialization

11

3

12

1

SDV 101 TOTAL HRI 219

Stock, Soup, and Sauce Preparation

2

3

3

HRI 218

Fruit, Vegetable, and Starch Preparation

2

3

3

HRI 128

Principles of Baking

2

3

3

HRI 119

Applied Nutrition for Food Service

2

0

2

Applied Nutrition for Food Service Laboratory

0

HRI 122

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 101

Orientation to Culinary and Pastry Arts

2

0

2

HRI 115

Food Service Managers Sanitation Certification

1

0

1

HRI 128

Principles of Baking

2

3

3

MTH 120

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

1

2

1

67

103

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE TOTAL

11

3

12

SDV 101

Orientation to Culinary and Pastry Arts

2

0

2

1

HRI 285

Chocolate and Sugar Arts

2

3

3

HRI 218

Fruit, Vegetable, and Starch Preparation

2

3

3

HRI 115

Food Service Managers Sanitation Certification

1

0

1

HRI 106

Principles of Culinary Arts I

2

3

3

HRI 106

Principles of Culinary Arts I

2

3

3

HRI 119

Applied Nutrition for Food Service

2

0

2

MTH 120

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

HRI 122

Applied Nutrition for Food Service Laboratory

0

3

1

TOTAL

11

3

12

8

12

12

TOTAL

HRI 219

Stock, Soup, and Sauce Preparation

2

3

3

HRI 226

Leadership and Kitchen Management

2

0

2

HRI 218

Fruit, Vegetable, and Starch Preparation

2

3

3

HRI 237

Current Issues and Environmental Responsibilities in the Hospitality Industry

2

0

2

HRI 119

Applied Nutrition for Food Service

2

0

2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

HRI 122

Applied Nutrition for Food Service Laboratory

0

3

1

___ ___ HRI 159

Introduction to Hospitality Industry Computer Systems

2

2

3

ACC 117

Essentials of Accounting

3

0

3

9

9

12

9

2

10

2

TOTAL

TOTAL HRI 226

Leadership and Kitchen Management

2

0

2

HRI 237

Current Issues and Environmental Responsibilities in the Hospitality Industry

2

0

2

Introduction to Hospitality Industry Computer Systems

2

2

3

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

9

2

10

HRI 251

Food and Beverage Cost Control I

3

0

3

HRI 288

Health-conscious Baking

2

3

3

HRI 284

Specialty, Spa, and Plated Desserts

2

3

3

HRI 159

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

___ ___

10

6

12

2

___ ___ TOTAL HRI 134

Food and Beverage Service Management

2

3

3

HRI 286

Wedding and Specialty Cakes

2

3

3

HRI 281

Artisan Breads

2

3

3

HRI 224

Recipe and Menu Management

2

3

3

9

9

12

TOTAL

2

TOTAL HRI 251

Food and Beverage Cost Control I

3

0

3

HRI 257

Catering Management

3

0

3

Hospitality Law

3

0

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

12

0

12

HRI 275 2

___ ___ TOTAL

HRI 190

Coordinated Internship

0

15

3

HRI 287

Contemporary Culinary Artistry and Innovation

1

2

2

HRI 134

Food and Beverage Service Management

2

3

3

HLT 100

First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

2

0

2

HRI 235

Marketing of Hospitality Services 3

0

3

HRI 255

0

3

Capstone Study in Culinary Arts

1

4

2

4

21

9

Human Resources Management and Training for Hospitality and Tourism

3

HRI 299

HRI 224

Recipe and Menu Management

3

0

3

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Culinary Arts, Pastry Arts Specialization     CURRICULUM: Culinary Management Specialization

104

67

TOTAL

11

3

12

HRI 190

Coordinated Internship

0

15

3

HRI 287

Contemporary Culinary Artistry and Innovation

1

2

2

HLT 100

First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

2

0

2

HRI 299

Capstone Study in Culinary Arts

1

4

2

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS TOTAL

4

21

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Culinary Arts, Culinary Management Specialization

9 67

2.

03.12.15 1

 SDV 101 must be taken in the student’s first semester.

3.

2

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

Dental Assisting

4.

Certificate PURPOSE: (l) To prepare students to perform the following services under supervision of a dentist: chairside assistance, including preparation of impression and restorative materials; exposing and processing intraoral or extraoral dental radiographs; laboratory and office management procedures; dental health education; recognition of emergencies; and patient care as authorized by the Virginia Board of Dentistry. (2) To qualify students for the Dental Assisting National Board Certification Examination. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: This program is designed to provide essential technological and practical knowledge required for a dental assistant to perform efficiently in a dental office. Training experiences in nearby dental clinics and private dental offices are provided. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission ADDITIONAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: Applicants must complete placement testing and submit their official high school transcript, GED, or certificate of completion of home schooling and college (if applicable) transcripts to Central Admissions and Records. The transcript must document completion of high school biology and one unit of high school math with a grade of “C” or better or completion of Reynolds equivalent BIO 1 and MTE 2 with a grade of “S.” Students must complete all developmental coursework prescribed as a result of Reynolds placement tests. PROGRAM NOTES: This program accepts new students in the spring and fall semesters of each year. Students admitted to Dental Assisting will be approved for entry into major/clinical courses (DNA 100 and higher) when they have satisfied the following requirements: 1.

All applicants will need to complete the general education prerequisites included in the Pre-Dental Assisting Career Studies Certificate and any developmental courses prescribed by placement testing. (Please see reynolds.edu/ curriculum/Pre-Dental_AssistingCSC.aspx for information on this career studies certificate.) All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of "S." General education courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or better. Students must maintain a 2.5 or higher

College Catalog 2016-2017

5.

cumulative GPA to be considered for the Dental Assisting Certificate program. College students transferring in all general education course requirements need to contact the program head for information. Students transferring in a partial number of courses must complete relevant components of the PreDental Assisting CSC to ensure all prerequisites are met. Students wishing to enter the Dental Assisting Certificate program at the beginning of a fall semester must have all developmental and Pre-Dental Assisting CSC courses completed by the end of the previous spring semester. Students wishing to enter at the beginning of a spring semester must have all requirements completed by the end of the previous summer semester. After completing all developmental and Pre-Dental Assisting CSC courses, students will need to interview with the program head to be eligible to enter the Dental Assisting Certificate. Enrollment in the Dental Assisting program is limited, so contact with the program head is imperative. Students enrolling in a fall semester should have the interview completed by the end of June. Students enrolling in a spring semester should have the interview completed by the end of September. A completed Student Health Form must be submitted prior to registering for the first semester of courses. This form will be obtained during the interview with program head.

Any student whose final grade falls below “C” in any course must obtain permission from the program head to continue the major in Dental Assisting. Students are responsible for transportation to and from facilities used for clinical experiences. DNA courses are sequential unless otherwise determined by the program head. FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS: Due to the increase in enrollment in the program, the number of DNA courses a student can enroll into may not meet the full-time status for financial aid. In addition to the regular college tuition and fees, the Dental Assisting program requires the following:  Textbooks

$300.00*

Uniforms, Lab Coat, Safety Glasses, Name Tag, Physical Exam, Immunizations, and Hepatitis B Vaccine Series

$300.00*

Background Check

$43.00*

The following expenses are optional: Student Membership in the ADAA

$45.00* (will increase each year after expiration of student membership)

DANB Certification Exam

$550.00*

*Costs listed are approximate. ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS: Students entering the Dental Assisting program must possess the physical ability to do the following: 1) aid in lifting and moving supplies and patients; 2) hear verbal communication and equipment sounds; 3) discern shades of color; 4) interact effectively with instructors, patients, and clinical and extern personnel; and 5)

105

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE demonstrate manual dexterity to manipulate materials. These essential functions are all validated on the Student Health Form and include the following: 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6.

7. 8.

Sufficient eyesight to observe small objects inside and outside the mouth; to read procedures manuals, records, and computers; and to manipulate materials. Sufficient hearing to communicate with instructors, patients, and dental staff, and to monitor and operate equipment. Satisfactory speaking, reading, and writing skills to effectively understand and communicate in English in a timely manner. Sufficient gross and fine motor skills and coordination to exhibit excellent eye-hand skills and dexterity to manipulate materials, equipment, and instruments, and to have coordination in lifting, stooping, walking, and bending. Satisfactory physical strength and endurance to be sitting or on feet for extended periods of time; to move heavy equipment and supplies; and to walk, bend, and reach. Satisfactory intellectual, emotional, and psychological health and functioning to ensure instructor, patient, and dental staff safety, and to exercise independent judgment and discretion to perform assigned tasks. Sufficient time management skills to effectively attend to multiple priorities and operate in a fast-paced setting. Satisfactory critical thinking skills and comprehension of detailed instructions to effectively operate in a dental setting.

Clinical facilities used by the program may mandate additional requirements for students that include, but may not be limited to, dress, body jewelry, and tattoo codes, and conformance with professional standards. Students will be informed prior to clinical rotations of any additional requirements. BACKGROUND CHECKS: Background checks are required of all students prior to entering any clinical rotations. Details concerning cost and vendor use will be provided to students during the interview appointment. Students who are aware of any potential problems in their backgrounds must discuss these with the program head. Continuation within and graduation from the program may be affected. PROGRESSION THROUGH THE PROGRAM: The college offers this program in affiliation with the health care agencies and practitioners in the communities the college serves. The college relies on its community affiliates to provide clinical education opportunities for its students, expert clinical preceptors, and course instructors for many courses. The often rapid changes in health care law, standards of practice, technology, and content of credentialing examinations increasingly necessitate sudden changes in the program’s course content, policies, procedures, and course scheduling. As a result, the college cannot guarantee every student continuous and uninterrupted clinical and course instruction as outlined in the printed catalog curriculum for this program. Circumstances beyond the control of the college may necessitate the postponement of course offerings or changes in the sequencing and/or location of scheduled courses or clinical assignments. Additionally, the college may have to change the instructor for courses after instruction has started.

106

CONTINUATION IN THE PROGRAM: A student must obtain permission from the program head to continue in the Dental Assisting program if the following conditions exist: (1) a grade below “C” is earned in any course; (2) overall GPA falls below a 2.0 average in any one semester. RE-ENTRY INTO THE PROGRAM: Should a student leave the program for any reason, entry back into the program will be based on space available and on the student’s GPA. Students who have not enrolled in a dental course for more than three semesters will be required to reapply to the program. The program head will evaluate any repeat or new catalog courses. This may include course changes in the current catalog during the student’s absence. DUAL ENROLLMENT STUDENTS: Dual enrollment students who are finishing the program on campus at Reynolds must complete the General College Curricular Admission Requirements, Additional Admission Requirements, and the Pre-Dental Assisting CSC courses with a “C” or better. Students must complete these requirements within a year of graduating from high school to be eligible to enroll in the Dental Assisting courses. Students will be enrolled in the dental courses on a space available basis and will be required to follow the current catalog curriculum. Students not completing the requirements within one year after high school graduation will be required to repeat all DNA courses found in the program’s curriculum. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Those students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. PROGRAM ACCREDITATION: The program in Dental Assisting is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation and has been granted the accreditation status of “approval without reporting requirements.” The Commission is a specialized accrediting body recognized by the United States Department of Education. The Commission on Dental Accreditation can be contacted at (312) 440-4653 or at 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611. The website address is www.ada.org/coda. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please seewww.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_120.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.   CURRICULUM: COURSE SDV 100 1

HLT 105 1

ENG 111

1

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

College Success Skills

1

0

1

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

1

0

1

College Composition I

3

0

3

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS ITE 115

1,2

1

PSY 200

3

0

3

Principles of Psychology

3

0

3

11

0

11

Books and Instruments

 $461 per academic year

Books and Instruments

 $178 per summer session

TOTAL DNA 100

Introduction to Oral Health Professions

1

0

1

DNA 103

Introduction to Oral Health

1

0

1

DNA 108

Dental Science

2

3

3

DNA 109

Practical Infection Control

2

3

3

DNA 110

Dental Materials

2

3

3

DNA 113

Chairside Assisting I

2

3

3

DNA 190

Coordinated Internship in Dental Assisting

0

8

2

10

20

16

TOTAL DNA 114

Chairside Assisting II

2

6

4

DNA 119

Dental Therapeutics

1

0

1

DNA 120

Community Health

1

0

1

DNA 134

Dental Radiology and Practicum

2

3

3

6

9

9

0

24

5

0

24

5

2

3

3

2

3

3

TOTAL DNA 196

On-Site Training

TOTAL DNA 130

Dental Office Management

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Certificate  in Dental Assisting

44

02.02.16 1

 This course is included in the Pre-Dental Assisting Career Studies Certificate. 2

FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS: In addition to the regular college tuition and fees, the Dental Laboratory Technology program requires the following:

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

 CSC 155 can be substituted for ITE 115.

Dental Laboratory Technology Associate of Applied Science PURPOSE: The major in Dental Laboratory Technology begins each fall semester and is designed to prepare students for employment as dental laboratory technicians to provide an essential support service for the dental professional according to the dentist’s prescription or work request. The dental laboratory technician constructs and repairs all types of dental prosthetic appliances. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Employment opportunities exist in commercial dental laboratories, hospital dental laboratories, private dental offices, dental research laboratories, and in dental sales. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

College Catalog 2016-2017

PROGRAM NOTES: Students admitted into this program will be approved for entry into major/clinical courses (DNL 140) when they have satisfied the following requirements: 1.

Completion of one unit of high school mathematics with a grade of “C” or better, or its equivalent (Reynolds MTE 3). 2. Completion of all Reynolds developmental coursework prescribed as a result of Reynolds placement tests. 3. In order to be officially accepted into the Dental Laboratory Technology program, applicants will need to meet with the program head to review their records. 4. All applicants must interview with the program head and receive permission to enter major and clinical courses. The interview will include evaluation of appropriate related experience and may include a manual dexterity test. Students must provide evidence of interest, aptitude, and motivation in dental laboratory technology. To arrange an appointment, students may call 804-523-5931. Any student whose final grade is below “C” in any dental laboratory course must obtain permission from the program head to continue the major in Dental Laboratory Technology. DNL courses are sequential unless otherwise determined by the program head. ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS: Students entering the Dental Laboratory Technology program should possess the physical ability to do the following: • • • • • •

Aid in lifting and moving supplies; Hear verbal communication and equipment sounds; Discern shades of color; Interact effectively with instructors and extern personnel; Demonstrate manual dexterity to manipulate materials; and Work with and around fire from either a Bunsen burner or oxygen/gas torch.

The following are also required: • • • •



Sufficient eyesight to observe small objects under microscopic magnification; to read procedures, manuals, records, and computers; and to manipulate materials; Sufficient hearing to communicate with instructors and dental laboratory participants and to monitor and operate laboratory equipment; Satisfactory speaking, reading, and writing skills to effectively understand and communicate in English in a timely manner; Sufficient gross and fine motor skills and coordination to exhibit excellent eye-hand skills and dexterity to manipulate materials, equipment, and instruments; to have coordination in lifting, stooping, walking, and bending; Satisfactory physical strength and endurance to be sitting or standing for extended periods of time and to move equipment;

107

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE •

• •

Satisfactory intellectual, emotional, and psychological health and functioning to ensure dental laboratory staff safety and to exercise independent judgment and discretion to perform assigned tasks; Sufficient time management skills to effectively attend to multiple priorities; and Satisfactory critical thinking skills and comprehension of detailed instructions to effectively operate in a dental laboratory setting.

DNL 100

0

2

NAS 105

Natural Science Topics for Modern Society

2

0

2

MTH 120

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

TOTAL

13

9

16

DNL 137

Orthodontic and Pedodontic Appliances

2

3

3

DNL 138

Introduction to Fixed Prosthodontics

3

9

6

DNL 160

Removable Prosthodontic Techniques

2

3

3

2

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

7-8

15-17 13

3

Dental Laboratory Management

2

0

2

DNL 220

Introduction to Dental Ceramics

3

9

6

PSY 200

Principles of Psychology

3

0

3

___ ___ TOTAL DNL 175

TOTAL DNL 216

4

DNL 231

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: All applicants to this program must take the computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, prior to enrollment in their first semester of courses. Those students not passing this exam after a maximum of two attempts will be required to complete ITE 115 or CSC 155 or equivalent prior to or concurrently with DNL 175. (See program advisor.)

CURRICULUM:

2

1

PROGRESSION THROUGH THE PROGRAM: The college offers this program in affiliation with the healthcare agencies and practitioners in the communities the college serves. The college relies on its community affiliates to provide clinical educational opportunities for its students, expert clinical preceptors, and course instructors for many courses. The often rapid changes in healthcare law, standards of practice, technology, and content of credentialing examinations increasingly necessitate sudden changes in the program’s course content, policies, procedures, and course scheduling. As a result, the college cannot guarantee every student continuous and uninterrupted clinical and course instruction as outlined in the printed catalog curriculum for this program. Circumstances beyond the control of the college may necessitate the postponement of course offerings or changes in the sequencing and/or location of scheduled courses or clinical assignments. Additionally, the college may have to change the instructor for courses after instruction has started.

PROGRAM ACCREDITATION: The program in Dental Laboratory Technology is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation and has been granted accreditation status of “approval without reporting requirements.” The Commission is a specialized accrediting body recognized by the United States Department of Education. The Commission on Dental Accreditation can be contacted at 312-440-4653 or at 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611. The website address is www.ada.org/coda.

Professional Ethics and Dental History

DNL 298 2

___ ___

8

9

11

Dental Laboratory Practicum

1

15

6

Advanced Dental Laboratory Techniques I

2

0

2

Seminar and Project

1-2

0

1-2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

7-8

15

12-13

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree  in Dental Laboratory Technology 03.12.15 1

 NAS 105 satisfies the general education science requirement for the Dental Laboratory Technology program. 2

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

DNL 110

Dental Laboratory Materials

2

3

3

 Students must pass the computer competency test or complete either ITE 115 or CSC 155 or equivalent prior to or concurrently with DNL 175.

DNL 140

Dental Anatomy, Physiology, and Principles of Occlusion

3

6

5

4

DNL 130

Introduction to Complete Dentures

3

9

6

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

9

18

15

3

9

6

TOTAL DNL 135

108

Introduction to Removable Partial Dentures

67

3

 Students may choose one or two areas of concentration from the following specialties: complete dentures, partial dentures, crown and bridge, dental ceramics, and orthodontics.

Diesel Mechanics Technology Certificate

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS PURPOSE: The Diesel Mechanics Technology curriculum is designed to introduce the fundamentals of diesel equipment repair and provide instruction in hydraulic systems, welding, diesel engine overhaul and tune-up, electrical circuits, power train maintenance, and fuel injection. The Diesel Mechanics Technology program will give graduates a practical background in basic diesel equipment technology principles. The curriculum provides practical training and the option of on-the-job experience through cooperative education. The demand for trained diesel mechanic personnel and technicians is increasing. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The Diesel Mechanics Technology curriculum prepares graduates for employment in any of the following occupations: Diesel Equipment Repair, Diesel Truck Repair, Supervisor, Shop Foreman, Heavy Duty Repair, Purchasing Agent, Salesperson, Power Train Repair, Fuel Injection Repair, Diesel Engine Repair, and Automotive Diesel Repair.

2

4

4

DSL 160

Air Brake Systems

2

2

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

11

14

18

0

15

3

0

15

3

TOTAL DSL 197

1

Cooperative Education or Approved Elective

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Certificate in  Diesel Mechanics Technology 

38

03.12.15  Approved electives include MEC 175 and other courses as approved by the program head.

PROGRAM NOTES: Students are strongly encouraged to meet with the program head either before registering for their first semester or early in their first semester of study. Students will be required to furnish clear lens safety glasses, leather work footwear, and proper clothing for working in the lab. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_920.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS.  HRS. HRS. CRE.

DSL 152

Diesel Power Trains, Chassis and Suspension

2

4

4

WEL 120

Fundamentals  of Welding

1

3

2

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

DSL 143

Diesel Truck  Electrical Systems

2

4

4

DSL 150

Mobile Hydraulics  and Pneumatics

2

2

3

ENG 111 or  ENG 137

College Composition I  or Communication Processes

3

0

3

11

13

17

DSL 176

Transportation  Air Conditioning

1

2

2

DSL 126

Diesel Engine Reconditioning

3

6

6

College Catalog 2016-2017

Diesel Fuel Systems  and Tuneup

1

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

TOTAL

DSL 131

 

Early Childhood Development Associate of Applied Science PURPOSE: The two-year degree program in Early Childhood Development is designed to prepare students with skills and theoretical knowledge related to the care, supervision, education, and development of young children from birth to age twelve. Upon successful completion of the curriculum, students will be prepared to seek employment in a variety of positions in the childcare field. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Employment opportunities include preparation or upgrading of skills for positions as child care center directors, assistant directors, before- and after-school teachers or assistant teachers, aides, playroom attendants, homebased providers or day care workers, camp directors, and beforeand after-school teachers in the following types of facilities: child day care centers, nursery schools, family day care homes, Head Start programs, recreational before- and after-school programs, hospital-based child care programs, pre-school at-risk programs, and pre-kindergarten church-sponsored programs. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to the general college curricular admission requirements, all entering students will be required to take placement tests in math and English to aid placement in the appropriate courses. Students who do not meet required placement levels must enroll in developmental studies courses. It is recommended that students arrange for a personal interview and advising appointment with the program head. It is recommended that students take courses in the sequence listed in the catalog. Students must attain a grade of “C” or higher in all courses with CHD, EDU, and PSY prefixes. An observation and participation in an approved early childhood/ primary setting is required. This is practicum experience

109

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE internship in a licensed or approved child care setting. It is a planned learning experience for the purpose of pulling together theories and practices learned in the classroom. A Criminal Record Clearance/Sex Offender Registry check is required for placement and volunteering. Students should see the program head for a list of convictions that will prevent employment. Students will be expected to complete a tuberculosis test before placement.

CHD 270

Administration of Child Care Programs

3

0

3

CST 100

Principles of Public Speaking

3

0

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

17

2

18

CHD 166

Infant and Toddler Programs

3

0

3

Students must have a valid first aid and CPR certification in order to be eligible for graduation. Valid cards must be filed with the program head or central admissions office prior to graduation and expiration.

CHD 119

Introduction to Reading Methods

2

2

3

CHD 210

Introduction to Exceptional Children

3

0

3

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once.

CHD 216

Early Childhood Programs, School, and Social Change

3

0

3

3

Advanced Observation and 1 Participation in Early Childhood/ Primary Settings

6

3

4

Seminar and Project

0

2

1

12

10

16

CURRICULUM:

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in  Early Childhood Development 

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

CHD 120

Introduction to Early Childhood Education

3

0

3

CHD 145

Teaching Art, Music, and Movement to Children

2

2

3

EDU 235

Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

15

2

16

TOTAL Models of Early Childhood Programs

3

0

3

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

CHD 146

Math, Science, and Social Studies for Children

2

2

3

CHD 205

Guiding the Behavior of Children 3

0

3

CHD 165

Observation and Participation in Early Childhood/ Primary Settings

1

6

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-2

0-4 2

1

TOTAL

12-14 8-12 17 Child Psychology

3

0

3

MTH__

Approved Mathematics Elective

3

0

3

CHD 118

Language Arts for Young Children

2

2

3

PSY 235 2

110

2

1

TOTAL

CHD 265

CHD 298 TOTAL

67

03.12.15 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 2

 Students considering transfer to a four-year college should consult their advisor about the appropriate transfer course to substitute for this course requirement. 3

 Prerequisite is CHD 165.

4

CHD 215

__ __

__ __

 Co-requisite is CHD 265.

Early Childhood Development Certificate PURPOSE: The one-year certificate in Early Childhood Development is designed to prepare students with skills related to the care, supervision, education, and development of young children from birth to age eight. There is also the ability to become qualified to work with children up to the age of twelve in programs that serve before- and after-school and recreational programs. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Employment opportunities include preparation or upgrading skills for positions as child care center directors, assistant directors, before- and after-school teachers or assistant teachers, aides, playroom attendants, homebased providers or day care workers, camp directors, and beforeand after-school teachers in the following types of facilities: child day care centers, nursery schools, family day care homes, Head Start programs, recreational before- and after-school programs,

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS hospital-based child care programs, pre-school at-risk programs, and pre-kindergarten church-sponsored programs.

SDV 100

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

CHD 216

PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to the general college curricular admission requirements, all entering students will be required to take placement tests in math and English to aid placement in the appropriate courses. Students who do not meet required placement levels must enroll in developmental studies courses. It is recommended that students arrange for a personal interview and advising appointment with the program head. An observation and participation in an approved early childhood/ primary setting is required in the second semester of the Early Childhood curriculum. This is a practicum experience internship in a licensed or approved child care setting. It is a planned learning experience for the purpose of pulling together the theories and practice learned in the classroom. A Criminal Record Clearance/ Sex Offender Registry Check is required for placement and volunteering. Students should see the program head for a list of convictions that will prevent employment. Students will be expected to complete a tuberculosis test before practicum placement. Students must attain a grade of “C” or higher in all courses with CHD, PSY, and EDU course prefixes. Students must have a valid first aid and CPR certificate in order to be eligible for graduation. Valid cards must be filed with the program head or central admissions office prior to expiration and graduation. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see http://www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/gainful-employment/ ge_info_632.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS.  HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

CHD 120

Introduction to Early Childhood Education

3

0

3

CHD 145

Teaching Art, Music, and Movement to Children

2

2

3

CHD 205

Guiding the Behavior of Children 3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

0

3

College Catalog 2016-2017

3

College Success Skills

1

0

1

15

2

16

Early Childhood Programs, School, and Social Change

3

0

3

CHD 146

Math, Science, and Social Studies for Children

2

2

3

CHD 215

Models of Early Childhood Programs

3

0

3

EDU 235

Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education

3

0

3

PSY 235

Child Psychology

3

0

3

CHD 165

Observation and Participation in Early Childhood/Primary Settings

1

6

3

15

8

18

TOTAL

TOTAL Total Minimum Credits for Certificate in  Early Childhood Development 

34

03.12.15

Emergency Medical Services Paramedic Associate of Applied Science PURPOSE: To prepare students to be knowledgeable, competent, entry-level, pre-hospital care practitioners and fill positions at the level of Paramedic. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Emergency Medical Services Paramedic ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to the general college curriculum admissions requirements, the student must have a current Virginia or National Registry EMT Certification and a valid CPR card for either the American Heart Association Healthcare Provider or the American Red Cross Professional Rescuer. Applicants to the program must have completed one unit of high school biology and one unit of high school chemistry with a minimum grade of “C” or obtain the permission of the EMS program head for a waiver to that requirement. The program meets the National EMS Education Standards and is approved by the Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services, the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians, and the Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for EMS Professions (CoAEMSP) through the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). In compliance with the Virginia State Board of Health and Virginia EMS regulations (12 VAC 5-31-1200 and 12 VAC 5-31-1460), students wishing to register for any of the courses with an EMS prefix in this program must be at least 18 years of age at the time

111

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE of their enrollment. Students younger than 18 are encouraged to enroll in any of the non-EMS prefix courses until they reach their 18th birthday and are legally eligible for enrollment in EMS courses.

CONTINUATION IN THE PROGRAM: To continue in the program, students must achieve a minimum course grade of “B” (80) in each EMS course with the exception of EMS 205, which requires a minimum grade of “C” (70).

FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS: In addition to the regular college tuition and fees, the EMS program requires the items listed below. The costs listed are subject to change. 

PROGRESSION THROUGH THE PROGRAM: The college offers this program in affiliation with the healthcare agencies and practitioners in the communities the college serves. The college relies on its community affiliates to provide clinical education opportunities for its students, expert clinical preceptors, and course instructors for many courses. The often rapid changes in healthcare law, standards of practice, technology, and content of credentialing examinations increasingly necessitate sudden changes in the program’s course content, policies, procedures, and course scheduling. As a result, the college cannot guarantee every student continuous and uninterrupted clinical and course instruction as outlined in the printed catalog curriculum for this program. Circumstances beyond the control of the college may necessitate the postponement of course offerings or changes in the sequencing and/or location of scheduled courses or clinical assignments. Additionally, the college may have to change the instructor for courses after instruction has started.

Textbooks, Workbook, and Certification Fees (CPR, ACLS, PHTLS, EPC, and   AMLS)

$830.00

Background Check and Drug Testing

$81.00

FISDAP Scheduler and Final Exams

$115.00

Uniforms (boots,   belt, pants, two Reynolds EMS program shirts)

$178.00

Testing Fees: 

 

ODEMSA

$250.00

National Registry Paramedic Cognitive Examination

 $110.00

Medical Check Up

varies according to student’s doctor fees

To determine current tuition and fees, visit www.reynolds.edu/ pay_for_college/tuition.aspx or call the School of Nursing and Allied Health office at (804)523-5375. The instructor will inform students of the textbooks and other required learning materials needed in the syllabus for each course. FUNCTIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS: The functional skills listed below apply to students entering the EMS – Emergency Medical Technician CSC, EMS – Intermediate CSC, EMS – Paramedic CSC, and EMS – Paramedic AAS degree. Students entering these programs must have the ability to: • • • • • • • •

112

Verbally communicate in person, via telephone and telecommunications using the English language; Hear spoken information from co-workers, patients, physicians, and dispatchers and sounds common to the emergency scene; Lift, carry, and balance a minimum of 125 pounds equally distributed (250 pounds with assistance), a height of 33 inches, and a distance of 10 feet; Read and comprehend written materials under stressful conditions; Use a prescribed format to document patient information in writing or by entry into a computer program; Demonstrate manual dexterity and fine motor skills, with ability to perform all tasks related to quality patient care in a safe manner; Bend, stoop, crawl, and walk on even surfaces; and Meet minimum vision requirements to operate a motor vehicle within the state.

NATIONAL REGISTRY OF EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIANS -- PARAMEDIC (NRP) TEST PASS RATES:  Reynolds EMS -Paramedic AAS students achieved a pass rate of 75% on the NRP test for 2015.  COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Emergency Medical Technician – Basic or Emergency Medical Technician – Basic I and  Emergency Medical Technician – Basic II

5 3 2

4 2 2

7 4 3

Emergency Medical Technician – Basic Clinical

0

2

1

BIO 141

Human Anatomy  and Physiology I

3

3

4

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

9

9

13

Introduction to Advanced Life Support

3

2

4

EMS 170

ALS Internship I

0

3

1

EMS 153

Basic ECG Recognition

2

0

2

1,2,5

EMS 111 or 

1,5

EMS 112   and  EMS 113

1,5

EMS 120

2

TOTAL EMS 151

5

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS EMS 157

ALS – Trauma Care

2

2

3

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

10

7

13

TOTAL EMS 155

ALS – Medical Care

3

2

4

EMS 159

ALS – Special Populations

2

2

3

EMS 172

ALS Clinical Internship II

0

3

1

EMS 173

ALS Field Internship II

0

3

1

HLT 143

Medical Terminology

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

11

10

15

TOTAL BIO 142

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 II

3

4

EMS 207

Advanced Patient Assessment

2

2

3

EMS 242

ALS Clinical Internship III

0

3

1

EMS 243

ALS Field Internship III

0

3

1

EMS 201

EMS Professional Development

3

0

3

EMS 205

Advanced Pathophysiology

4

0

4

12

11

16

Advanced Pharmacology

3

2

4

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

EMS 211

Operations

1

2

2

EMS 244

ALS Clinical Internship IV

0

3

1

EMS 245

ALS Field Internship IV

0

3

1

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

10

10

14

TOTAL EMS 209 __ __

3,4

4

___ ___ TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Emergency Medical Services – Paramedic

71

03.11.15 1

 EMS 112 and 113 taken in two consecutive semesters are equivalent to the one semester EMS 111 and are interchangeable for the degree. The required CPR certification is included in EMS 111 and 112. EMS 112 is a prerequisite for EMS 113. 2

 EMS 120 must be taken concurrently with EMS 111 or EMS 113.

3

 PSY 230 is the recommended social/behavioral science elective. 4

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 5

 EMS 111, 112, and 151 fulfill the general education requirement for personal wellness.

College Catalog 2016-2017

Fire Science Technology Associate of Applied Science SPECIALIZATIONS: Emergency Services Leadership PURPOSE: The major in Fire Science Technology has been designed for students desiring to advance in the fire protective service occupations and to acquire knowledge in fire protection fundamentals useful in related occupations. With the increasing complexity of modern technology in the fire protection field, it is necessary for fire protection personnel to acquire specialized knowledge and problem-solving skills to meet the challenge of a changing society. The Emergency Services Leadership specialization is designed to prepare first responders seeking to advance into leadership positions with the knowledge and skills to succeed in leadership, management, and administration within the emergency response services. Students will be prepared to prevent and manage critical fire and emergency safety situations, write technical fire and medical reports, manage personnel, and provide emergency scene leadership. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Firefighter, fire officer, fire protection specialist, fire/emergency instructor, fire or building inspector, fire investigator, rescue service, emergency medical service, hazardous materials services, emergency manager, occupational or industrial safety and risk management, fire marshal, fire sprinkler designer, design manager, sprinkler installer or mechanic, and related occupations ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: The purpose of the associate of applied science (AAS) degree curriculum is to prepare students for immediate employment upon graduation. Four-year college and university transfer opportunities for AAS degrees, if existing, are usually very specific in nature. Reynolds has formal transfer articulation agreements with four-year institutions that enable graduates who qualify to transfer courses completed in the AAS degree. These transfer articulation agreements are subject to change or expiration. In addition, students may substitute some courses in the AAS degree curriculum with courses that typically transfer to senior institutions. Students interested in transferring in general or transferring under a formal transfer articulation agreement should consult their faculty advisor upon program entry for further guidance. There are no physical requirements, such as height, weight, eyesight, and physical dexterity; however, the student should understand that there may be some requirements for employment in fire or rescue service agencies. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115.

113

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM: Fire Science Technology Specialization

 

CURRICULUM: Emergency Services Leadership Specialization COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB.  CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

Principles of Public Speaking

3

0

3

Principles of Fire and Emergency Services Safety and Survival

3

0

3

2

Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

2

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB.  CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

CST 100

FST 100

Principles of Emergency Services

3

0

3

FST 121

FST 110

Fire Behavior and Combustion

3

0

3

2

Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

___ ___

2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

___ ___

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

16

3

17

 

TOTAL

16

3

17

Technical Writing

3

0

3

ENG 115

Technical Writing

3

0

3

1

Hazardous Materials Chemistry

3

0

3

FST 140

Fire Officer 1

4

0

4

1

Fire Prevention

3

0

3

BUS 117

Leadership Development

3

0

3

3

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

2

0

3

3

0

3

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

___ ___

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

___ ___ ITE 115

0

3

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

ITE 115

 

TOTAL

19

0

19

18

0

18

FST 240

Fire Administration

3

0

3

FST 250

Fire Officer 2

3

0

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

GIS 200

Geographical Informational Systems

3

0

3

FST 220

Building Construction for Fire Protection

3

0

3

___ ___

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

 

TOTAL 

15-16 0-2 16

FST 115

Fire Prevention

3

0

3

FST 245

Fire and Risk Analysis

3

0

3

FST 210

Legal Aspects of Fire Service

3

0

3

Fire Protection Systems

3

0

3

1

___ ___ ___ ___ TOTAL ENG 115 FST 112

FST 115

MTH 120

3

2

TOTAL FST 240

Fire Administration

3

0

3

FST 235

Strategy and Tactics

3

0

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

Principles of Fire and Emergency Services Safety and Survival

3

0

3

Building Construction for Fire Protection

3

0

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

__ __

2,4

FST 121

FST 220 2

___ ___ TOTAL

15-16 0-2 16

FST 205

Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply

3

0

3

5

MTH 120

__ __

2,4

2

FST 245

Fire and Risk Analysis

3

0

3

FST 215

FST 210

Legal Aspects of Fire Service

3

0

3

FST 237

Emergency Services Supervision

3

0

3

FST 215

Fire Protection Systems

3

0

3

 

TOTAL

15

0

15

Principles of Public Speaking

3

0

3

15

0

15

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree Fire Science, Emergency Services Leadership Specialization

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Fire Science Technology

66

CST 100 TOTAL

114

5

67

12.18.15

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 1

 Students with certain fire service certifications may be awarded credit for this course. See course descriptions or program head for more details.

  CURRICULUM:

2

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 3

 Students planning to attend a four-year institution are recommended to take MTH 151, 170, or 163 in place of MTH 120. 4

 EMS 111 or 112 will also satisfy the general education requirement for personal wellness. Students who have a valid EMT certificate will be given credit for EMS 112 when all other curriculum requirements have been met.

PURPOSE: The certificate in Fire Science Technology is designed to provide a broad-based knowledge of current and future advances in the fire science field. Rapid advances in technology require that personnel in the field keep abreast of the latest changes in technology and equipment.

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see http://www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful %20Employment/GE_Info_428.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.

College Catalog 2016-2017

College Success Skills

1

0

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

FST 100

Principles of Emergency Services

3

0

3

Fire Behavior and Combustion

3

0

3

1

Approved Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

1

Approved Laboratory Science Elective

3

3

4

16

3

17

TOTAL

Certificate

There are no physical requirements, such as height, weight, eyesight, and physical dexterity; however, the student should understand that there may be some requirements for employment in fire or rescue service agencies.

SDV 100

___ ___

Fire Science Technology

PROGRAM NOTES: This program is designed to provide full transferability to the AAS degree program where more in-depth knowledge in management is emphasized.

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

___ ___

 Students with Fire Service Instructor 1 and Train the Trainer Firefighter 1 and 2 Instructor or Fire Service Instructor 2 certification can be awarded credit for FST 135, which will substitute for this course. See course descriptions or program head for more details.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

TITLE

FST 110

5

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Firefighter, Fire Officer, Fire Protection Specialist, Fire/Emergency Instructor, Fire or Building Inspector, Fire Investigator, Rescue Service, Emergency Medical Service, Hazardous Materials Services, Emergency Manager, Occupational or Industrial Safety and Risk Management, and related occupations.

COURSE

ENG 115

Technical Writing

3

0

3

FST 112

Hazardous Materials Chemistry

3

0

3

FST 115

Fire Prevention

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

2

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

1

Approved Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

18

0

18

MTH 120 ___ ___ TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Certificate in Fire Science 

35

03.11.15 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 2

 Students planning to attend a four-year institution are recommended to take MTH 151, 170, or 163 in place of MTH 120. Students should check with their transfer institution to determine which mathematics course to take.  

Horticulture Technology Associate of Applied Science PURPOSE: The Horticulture Technology program is designed to prepare students for a wide range of horticulture careers. Training is available for those who seek to begin a career track, and those who are changing careers. Individuals already in the green industry are invited to improve or upgrade their skills and knowledge with appropriate courses. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The program offers handson laboratory work and classroom instruction in the design-

115

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE install-maintain aspects of landscaping, in floral design, and in production of horticultural materials. Many of our graduates own and operate their own businesses, while others are employed by corporate, commercial, or governmental entities.

1

___ ___ TOTAL

PROGRAM NOTES: Students in the Horticulture Technology program must complete a basic core of specified horticulture technology and general education courses. In addition, the students will select technical courses which match with their career objectives, in consultation with the program head.

CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB.  CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

MTH 103 or MTH 120

Applied Technical Mathematics or  Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

1

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

1

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

2

Practical Horticulture

0

2

1

Principles of Horticulture

3

0

3

16

2

17

___ ___ ___ ___ HRT 106 HRT 110

2

TOTAL College Composition II

3

0

3

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

1

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

2,3

Chemicals in Horticulture

2

2

3

2

Horticultural Botany

2

2

3

HRT 127

116

2

3

HRT___

4

Approved HRT Elective

2-3

0-2

3

HRT___

4

Approved HRT Elective

2-3

0-2

3

HRT___

4

Approved HRT Elective

2-3

0-2

3

HRT___

4

Approved HRT Elective

2-3

0-2

3

10-14 2-10 15

HRT 202

Landscape Plant Materials II

2

2

3

HRT___

4

Approved HRT Elective

2-3

0-2

3

HRT___

4

Approved HRT Elective

2-3

0-2

3

HRT___

4

Approved HRT Elective

2-3

0-2

3

HRT___

4

Approved HRT Elective

2-3

0-2

3

Coordinated Internship

0

10

2

HRT 2,5

290

TOTAL

10-14 12-2017

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Horticulture

66

03.13.15 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics/science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 2

 Course is required of all Horticulture Technology AAS students.

3

 Credit will be given for HRT 125, Chemicals in Horticulture, upon evidence of a valid Commercial Pesticide Applicator Certificate (with an endorsement in 3-A and 3-B) issued from VDACS or completion of HRT 199, Training for Commercial Pesticide Application.  Approved HRT electives are listed below according to focus areas in the field of horticulture. 5

ITE 115

HRT 125

2

4

ENG 112

___ ___

Landscape Plant Materials I

2

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once.

0-4 2

2

TOTAL

Students who already have a two-year, four-year, or graduate degree should request that their transcripts be sent to the college registrar if transfer credit is desired. It is strongly recommended that students meet with the program head or counselor either before registering or early in their first semester of study.

0-2

13-15 4-8 17

HRT 201

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

CURRICULUM SEQUENCE: The curriculum sequence that follows is one example of how courses may be completed. Students should work with their program advisor to determine the most appropriate sequence.

Personal Wellness Elective

 Coordinated Internship will be waived on evidence of five or more years’ experience in the green industry. An approved HRT elective will be substituted.

Following is a list of approved Horticulture electives that is organized according to focus areas within the green industry.  In consultation with their HRT advisor, students will select a total of 24 credits of HRT electives from this list that are consistent with students’ career objectives.  Horticulture electives in the SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE focus HRT 130 Introduction to Biointensive Mini-Farming (3 cr.) HRT 134 Four Season Food Production (3 cr.) HRT 238 Growing for Market Mini-Farming (3 cr.)

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS HRT 239 Complete Diet Mini-farming (3 cr.)

Associate of Applied Science

Horticulture electives in the LANDSCAPE DESIGN focus

PURPOSE: The Hospitality Management program provides a specialized business education and is intended to lead to management employment in the hospitality industry.

HRT 120 History of Garden Design (3 cr.) HRT 150 Theory of Landscape Design (3 cr.)

HRT 235 Landscape Drawing (3 cr.)

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The Hospitality Management degree prepares graduates to contribute leadership at manager and director levels in hotels, resorts, restaurants, catering operations, non-commercial food service operations, and a variety of retail businesses, including business development and ownership.

HRT 244 Computer-Aided Drafting and Design (CADD) for Landscape Designers (3 cr.)

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

HRT 249 Perennial Plants (3 cr.)

PROGRAM NOTES: The Hospitality Management AAS degree requires that students have the following competencies: (1) competency in Math Essentials MTE 1-3 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent, and (2) competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of a college-level composition course. Students needing to complete developmental studies courses in English or mathematics may take those courses concurrently with HRI courses, if approved by the program head.

HRT 231 Planting Design I (3 cr.) HRT 232 Planting Design II (3 cr.)

HRT 275 Landscape Construction and Maintenance (3 cr.) Horticulture electives in the PLANT PRODUCTION focus HRT 115 Plant Propagation (3 cr.) HRT 121 Greenhouse Crop Production I (3 cr.) HRT 122 Greenhouse Crop Production II (3 cr.) HRT 225 Nursery and Garden Center Management (3 cr.) HRT 226 Greenhouse Management (3 cr.) VEN 100 Introduction to Viticulture (3 cr.) Horticulture electives in the FLORAL DESIGN focus HRT 260 Introduction to Floral Design (3 cr.) HRT 266 Advanced Floral Design (3 cr.) HRT 268 Advanced Floral Design Applications (3 cr.) Horticulture electives in the LANDSCAPE and TURF MANAGEMENT focus HRT 119 Irrigation Systems for Turf and Ornamentals (3 cr.) HRT 126 Home Landscaping (3 cr.) HRT 199 Training for Commercial Pesticide Application (3 cr.) HRT 205 Soils (3 cr.)

Faculty provide advising to enhance student success. All students wishing to enroll in Hospitality Management must attend an advising session. Once enrolled, students must meet with their advisor every semester to review their scheduling strategy and status toward graduation. Information about advising and enrolling in classes is available at http://www.reynolds.edu/ get_started/programs/business/culinary_and_hospitality/ admission.aspx. Students who earn a final grade lower than “C” in any HRI course must obtain permission from their advisor to continue the major in Hospitality Management. Students will be required to repeat courses in their major when grades lower than “C” are earned. The competency-based nature of the curriculum allows students with previous educational studies or training experience to be evaluated for advanced standing. Students who believe they are eligible for such consideration are required to meet with their advisor to discuss eligibility for evaluation and possible advanced standing.

HRT 295 Sports Turf Management (3 cr.)

The purpose of the associate of applied science (AAS) degree curriculum is to prepare students for immediate employment upon graduation. Four-year college and university transfer opportunities for associate of applied science degrees, if existing, are usually very specific in nature. Students may, however, substitute some courses in the AAS degree curriculum with courses that generally transfer to senior institutions. Students should consult their advisor at the earliest possible date for further guidance and are advised to get assurances in writing in advance from the institution to which they wish to transfer.

Hospitality Management

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing HRI 159.

HRT 227 Professional Landscape Management (3 cr.) HRT 249 Perennial Plants (3 cr.) HRT 259 Arboriculture (3 cr.) HRT 269 Professional Turf Care (3 cr.) HRT 275 Landscape Construction and Maintenance (3 cr.)

College Catalog 2016-2017

117

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE CURRICULUM SEQUENCE: The courses listed below are required for degree completion, but do not reflect a prescribed sequence. Recommended sequences can be viewed at http:// www.reynolds.edu/get_started/programs/business/ culinary_and_hospitality/hospitalitysequence.aspx.

3

3

HLT 100

First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

2

0

2

4

18

8

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AAS degree in  Hospitality Management 

67

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

College Success Skills

1

0

1

06.19.15

College Composition I

3

0

3

1

Approved Elective

2

0

2

Principles of Hospitality Management

3

0

3

A list of approved electives is provided here, as well as on the Hospitality website: reynolds.edu/get_started/ programs/ business/culinary_and_hospitality/ hospitalitysequence.aspx

2

Approved Elective

3

0

3

HRI 115 -- Food Service Managers Sanitation Certification

12

0

12

HRI 119 -- Applied Nutrition for Food Service

2

Approved Elective

3

0

3

3

Marketing of Hospitality Services 3

0

3

3

Human Resources Management and Training for Hospitality and Tourism

3

0

3

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

12

0

12

Essentials of Accounting

3

0

3

3

Introduction to Hospitality Industry Computer Systems

2

2

3

3

Training and Development for the Hospitality Industry

3

0

3

4

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

11

2

12

1

ENG 111 _______ HRI 154

2

3

_______ TOTAL _______ HRI 235

HRI 255

MTH 120 TOTAL ACC 117 HRI 159

HRI 242 ______ TOTAL

Supervision in the Hospitality Industry

3

0

3

3

Food and Beverage Cost Control I

3

0

3

3

Catering Management

3

0

3

3

Hospitality Law

3

0

3

12

0

12

Approved Elective

2

0

2

3

Food and Beverage Service Management

2

3

3

3

Strategic Lodging Management

3

0

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

10

3

11

0

15

3

HRI 257

HRI 275 TOTAL

_______ HRI 134

2

HRI 270

_______

4

TOTAL 3

HRI 290

Coordinated Internship

SDV must be taken in the student’s first semester.

2

HRI 190 (HRI advisor approval) -- Coordinated Internship HRI 224 (prerequisite HRI 251) -- Recipe and Menu Management BUS 111 -- Principles of Supervision I BUS 116 -- Entrepreneurship Foreign Language (3-4 credits) 3

Students enrolled in HRI classes will be permitted into those classes only when wearing approved uniforms. Specifications may be obtained at reynolds.edu/get_started/programs/ business/culinary_and_hospitality/uniformsnew.aspx or from program faculty. 4

3

HRI 241

118

2

TITLE

SDV 100

HRI 251

Seminar and Project in Hospitality Management

3

CURRICULUM: COURSE

HRI 298

A list of approved general education electives humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

Human Services Associate of Applied Science PURPOSE: The two-year associate degree in Human Services is designed to prepare students with the requisite professional knowledge, skills, and values to obtain entry-level positions in a diverse, pluralistic, and ever-changing, public, private, and nonprofit human services delivery system. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Employment opportunities include, but are not limited to, the following types of employers: social service agencies; childcare agencies; hospitals; mental retardation and rehabilitation agencies; mental health settings; juvenile and adult corrections; private, non-profit, and for-profit agencies; and geriatric settings. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to the general college curricular admission requirements, an interview with the program head is recommended. While a face-to-face interview is preferable, an interview can also be conducted via telephone or electronic conference. The curriculum provides students with the requisite knowledge, skills, professional values, and attitudes necessary to practice in a diverse client and service delivery system. The program is also designed to enhance the professional knowledge, skills, and marketability of persons already employed in human services. Students should consult their faculty advisor or a counselor to discuss educational goals and objectives, employment opportunities, course electives, internship requirements, and potential sites for internships.

HMS 100

Introduction to Human Services

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

MEN 101

Mental Health Skill Training I

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

16

0

16

All students in the program should take the core curriculum courses in sequence as listed in the catalog. Students who receive a final grade lower than “C” in any of the core courses should repeat the course before taking further courses in the core curriculum. Students who are having academic difficulty should discuss their academic progress with a counselor or faculty advisor.

TOTAL

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

SOC 200

Principles of Sociology

3

0

3

College Catalog 2016-2017

College Composition II

3

0

3

HMS 121

Basic Counseling Skills I

3

0

3

HMS 141

Group Dynamics I

3

0

3

HMS 236

Gerontology

3

0

3

MEN 102

Mental Health Skill Training II

3

0

3

15

0

15

Introduction to Drug Use and Abuse

3

0

3

HMS 226

Helping Across Cultures

3

0

3

HMS 122

Basic Counseling Skills II

3

0

3

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

HMS 227

The Helper as Change Agent

3

0

3

HMS 142

Group Dynamics II

3

0

3

18

0

18

TOTAL HLT 121

A coordinated internship in a human service agency is required in the fourth semester of the curriculum. Students should discuss the internship course with the program head, as well as select, interview, confirm a placement supervisor and site, and complete all required internship documents the semester prior to registering for HMS 290: Coordinated Internship. Students can select from a directory of internship sites maintained by the program head or select and interview in a human services agency of their choice that formally agrees to provide the required learning experiences and supervision for 130-clock hours. Students are expected to provide their own transportation to the agency. The purpose of the associate of applied science (AAS) degree curriculum is to prepare students for employment upon graduation. Four-year college and university transfer opportunities for associate of applied science degrees, if existing, are usually very specific in nature. Students may, however, substitute some courses in the AAS degree curriculum with courses that generally transfer to senior institutions. Students should consult their program advisor at the earliest possible date for further guidance and are advised to get assurances in writing, in advance, from the institution to which they wish to transfer.

ENG 112

1

MTH 120

2

TOTAL CST 110

Introduction to Speech Communication

3

0

3

PSY 230

Developmental Psychology

3

0

3

HMS 225

Functional Family Intervention

3

0

3

HMS 266

Counseling Psychology

3

0

3

___ ___3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

HMS 290

Coordinated Internship in Human Services

0

15

3

15

15

18

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Human Services

67

03.13.15 1 

An approved personal wellness elective may be substituted for this course. A list of approved general education electives (humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics/ science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 2 

Students may substitute either a transfer math course or BIO 101 for MTH 120. Students wishing to substitute a transfer math course should consult their advisor and transfer institution for further guidance. 3 

A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics/science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

119

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Information Systems Technology Associate of Applied Science Specializations: Computer Programmer Internet Applications Development (Web Design) Microcomputer Applications (Administrative/Office Applications) Microcomputer Technical Support (Networking) PURPOSE: The purpose of the Information Systems Technology AAS degree is to develop and/or enhance the information technology skills and knowledge of students by providing training in the latest technology that businesses demand. This program is for students who seek employment in business information systems, who desire to update their information technology skills for their current job, and who desire to improve their technology skills in order to enhance their non-information technology major. TRANSFER INFORMATION: Four-year college and university transfer opportunities for AAS degrees, if existing, are usually very specific in nature. A transfer opportunity in IT Management at the University of Richmond's School of Professional and Continuing Studies exists for students in the Information Systems Technology degree. Students interested in this transfer opportunity or transferring in general should consult their faculty advisor upon program entry for further guidance. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The Computer Programmer specialization provides knowledge and skills in computer programming and application software development that includes occupations, such as computer programmer, applications programmer, programmer/analyst, internet programmer, and related computer programming occupations. The Microcomputer Technical Support (Networking) specialization provides technical knowledge and skills in computer hardware and operating systems and network operating systems, such as Microsoft and Linux. Occupations include hardware and software support technician, network specialist, help desk specialist, and related networking occupations. The Internet Applications Development (Web Design) specialization provides knowledge and skills for web page design for occupations, such as web page designer, webmaster, and related web-design occupations. The Microcomputer Applications (Administrative/Office Applications) specialization provides knowledge and skills in support of office, business, or administrative procedures that include occupations, such as administrative and office support specialist, information center specialist, and related office applications occupations. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students must attain the grade of “C” or higher in IT courses taken for this degree. Students must get approval from the appropriate IT program head or their academic advisor in choosing program electives or substitutions. Students should complete SDV 100 during their first semester of study at the college. NOTE FOR STUDENTS IN THE COMPUTER PROGRAMMER SPECIALIZATION: Students should consult their academic

120

advisor prior to beginning the degree. Students should take ITP 136 in the first semester in order to complete the programming sequence of courses (ITP 136, ITP 236, ITP 244, ITP 298) in the four semesters. Students could take ACC 117 in the second semester in order to take ITP 136 in the first semester. All new students should take the English and mathematics placement tests immediately after applying to the college. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by successfully passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ACC 117

Essentials of Accounting

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

College Composition I

3

0

3

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

ITE 221

PC Hardware and OS Architecture

4

0

4

17

0

17

1

ENG 111 MTH 120

2

TOTAL   CURRICULUM: Computer Programmer Specialization COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

Applied Business Mathematics

3

0

3

Database Fundamentals

4

0

4

C# Programming I

4

0

4

Approved Information Systems Elective

3-4

0

3-4

BUS 125

2

ITD 130 ITP 136 IT ___

3

6

TOTAL

17-18 0

17-18

AST 205

Business Communications

3

0

3

ITN 101

Introduction to Network Concepts

4

0

4

ITP 236

C# Programming II

4

0

4

ITP 244

ASP.Net-Server Side Programming

4

0

4

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS ITP 251

Systems Analysis and Design

TOTAL

3

 

18

0

18

CURRICULUM:

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

4

Humanities/Fine Arts Electives

3

0

3

5

Survey of Economics

3

0

3

Introduction to Business Statistics

3

0

3

Seminar and Project: Capstone Course

4

0

4

___ ___

BUS 220 IT_ 298

0

4

___ ___

ECO 120

3

7

TOTAL

Microcomputer Applications (Administrative/Office Applications) Specialization TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

Applied Business Mathematics

3

0

3

AST 141

Word Processing I

3

0

3

ITN 101

Introduction to Network Concepts

4

0

4

Spreadsheet Software

3

0

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

BUS 125

13-14 0-2 14

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Information Systems Technology, Computer Programmer Specialization

COURSE

66

2

ITE 140 4

___ ___  

TOTAL

CURRICULUM:

ECO 120

Internet Applications Development (Web Design) Specialization COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

Applied Business Mathematics

3

0

3

ITD 110

Web Page Design I

3

0

3

ITD 130

Database Fundamentals

4

0

4

Survey of Economics

3

0

3

16

0

16

BUS 125

2

ECO 120

5

TOTAL

16-17 0-2 17 Survey of Economics

3

0

3

ITE 130

Introduction to Internet Services

3

0

3

ITE 150

Desktop Database Software

3

0

3

ITD 110

Web Page Design I

3

0

3

ITP 251

Systems Analysis and Design

3

0

3

15

0

15

5

TOTAL ___ ___

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

AST 205

Business Communications

3

0

3

BUS 220

Introduction to Business Statistics

3

0

3

Approved Information Technology or Administrative Support Technology Elective

3-4

0

3-4

Seminar and Project: Capstone Course (IT or AST)

4

0

4

4

6

AST 205

Business Communications

3

0

3

BUS 220

Applied Business Statistics

3

0

3

IT___  or  AST__

ITN 101

Introduction to Network Concepts

4

0

4

___298

ITD 212

Interactive Web Design

4

0

4

TOTAL

ITD 210

Web Page Design II

4

0

4

18

0

18

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Information Systems Technology, Microcomputer Applications (Administrative/Office Applications) Specialization

TOTAL

7

16-17 0

___ __

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

ITP 251

Systems Analysis and Design

3

0

3

 

Approved Information Technology Elective

3-4

0

3-4

CURRICULUM:

Seminar and Project: Capstone Course

4

0

4

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

5

IT___  

6

IT_ 298

7

4

___ ___ TOTAL

13-14 0-2 14-15

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Information Systems Technology, Internet Applications Development (Web Design) Specialization

College Catalog 2016-2017

65

16-17 65

Microcomputer Technical Support (Networking) Specialization COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

Applied Business Mathematics

3

0

3

ITN 171

UNIX I

3

0

3

ITN 101

Introduction to Network Concepts

4

0

4

BUS 125

2

121

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ECO 120

5

Survey of Economics

TOTAL

3

0

3

Management

16

0

16

Associate of Applied Science

BUS 220

Introduction to Business Statistics

3

0

3

ITP 251

Systems Analysis and Design

3

0

3

Client Operating System (Windows 8)

4

0

4

Server Administration (Server 2012)

4

0

4

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

8

ITN 110

8

ITN 111

4

___ ___ TOTAL

14-15 0-2 15

___ ___

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

AST 205

Business Communications

3

0

3

ITN 260

Network Security Basics

4

0

4

Approved Information Technology Elective

3-4

0

3-4

Seminar and Project: Capstone Course

4

0

4

4

IT_  

6

IT__298

7

TOTAL

17-18 0

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Information Systems Technology, Microcomputer Technical Support (Networking) Specialization

17-18 65

02.02.16 1

ACC 211 may be substituted for ACC 117.

2

Students considering transfer to a four-year college should take a transfer mathematics sequence (consult advisor). 3

Students in the Computer Programmer specialization should take ITP 136 (C# Programming I) in the first semester in order to complete the sequence of ITP 136, ITP 236, ITP 244, ITP 298 in the four semesters. See program note above for programming specialization. 4

A list of approved general education electives (humanities/fine arts and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 5

ECO 201 may be substituted for ECO 120.

6

One IT elective can come from any of the program areas (ITP, ITN, ITD, and ITE). Networking majors should take ITN 254 (Virtual Infrastructure) as their IT elective. 7

Should the capstone course not run in the spring semester and students are ready to graduate, this course could be substituted with an upper-level IT elective with approval from the academic advisor or IT program head. 8

Students in the Networking specialization should take ITN 110 in the first 8-week session and ITN 111 in the second 8-week session.

122

SPECIALIZATIONS:  Retail Management Small Business Management PURPOSE: The Management degree program is designed to serve the needs of individuals presently employed in businesses and those who are interested in ownership or management of businesses. Additionally, the program is designed for those who may be seeking a promotion and have the potential for supervisory and management positions. Students will gain a solid foundation in key business areas and management. Students will develop critical thinking skills and practices to address business issues and skills in strategic management and retail. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES:  Small Business Management – Small businesses represent the majority of businesses in the United States and can be started at a low cost and on a part-time basis. This specialization will prepare students for self-employment and careers in small business. It directly focuses on the practical aspects of small business and business ownership. At the completion of the Small Business Management Specialization, students will have newly developed knowledge and skills to operate a successful business, such as a franchise, restaurant, day care center, sporting goods store, computer service business, bridal store, clothing store, printing service, or any micro-business. Retail Management – Retailing is a dynamic industry. Every successful retail store has a manager or team of managers. This specialization focuses on preparing students for a career in either store management or sales. Retail managers must make important decisions on a daily basis, such as buying, pricing, advertising, staffing, and logistics. Students learn to direct staff and operations on a sales floor. Students also learn how to make sales, manage customer service, and maintain records. Students may obtain entry-level positions as store managers, sales managers, department managers, or assistant account representatives. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission COORDINATED INTERNSHIPS: All students in the Management degree program are required to complete a coordinated internship that provides on-the-job training. The internship provides students with practical exposure to many facets of management and retailing. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM:

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Small Business Management Specialization

MKT 201 1

Introduction to Marketing

3

0

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-2

0-4 2

College Success Skills

1

0

COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

__ __

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

TOTAL

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

BUS 100

Introduction to Business

3

0

3

BUS 111

Principles of Supervision

3

0

3

MKT 201

Introduction to Marketing

3

0

3

MTH 120

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

Personal Wellness Elective

0-2

0-4 2

BUS 205

Human Resource Management

3

0

3

College Success Skills

1

0

MKT 215

Sales and Marketing Management

3

0

3

Merchandise Buying and Control

3

0

3

__ __

1

SDV 100 TOTAL

SDV 100

1

1

13-15 0-4 15

13-15 0-4 15

MKT 227

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

TOTAL

18

0

18

BUS 111

Principles of Supervision

3

0

3

ECO 120

Survey of Economics

3

0

3

MTH 120

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

MKT 220

Principles of Advertising

3

0

3

BUS 205

Human Resource Management

3

0

3

AST 205

Business Communication

3

0

3

MKT 215

Sales and Marketing Management

3

0

3

MKT 216

Retail Organization and Management

3

0

3

FIN 215

Financial Management

3

0

3

__ __

Marketing or Business Elective

3

0

3

18

0

18

Coordinated Internship

0

15

3

TOTAL ECO 120

Survey of Economics

3

0

3

BUS 125

Applied Business Mathematics

3

0

3

AST 205

Business Communication

3

0

3

BUS 165

Small Business Management

3

0

3

BUS 240

Introduction to Business Law

3

0

3

Business or Marketing Elective

3

0

3

18

0

18

__ __

2

TOTAL

2

MKT 290 TOTAL

15

15

18

ACC 117

Essentials of Accounting

3

0

3

MKT 260

Customer Service Management

3

0

3

MKT 271

Consumer Behavior

3

0

3

MKT 298

Seminar and Project

3

0

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

15

0

15

__ __

1

TOTAL

ACC 117

Essentials of Accounting

3

0

3

MKT 260

Customer Service Management

3

0

3

BUS 260

Planning for Small Business

3

0

3

Coordinated Internship

0

15

3

03.13.15

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

1

12

15

15

3

BUS 290 __ __

1

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Management, Small Business Management Specialization 

66

3

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Management, Retail Management Specialization 

66

A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 2

A list of approved business and marketing electives is available in the School of Business office.

 

3

MKT 290 is an equivalent course for BUS 290 for Retail Management Majors.

CURRICULUM: Retail Management Specialization COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Medical Laboratory Technology

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

Associate of Applied Science

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

BUS 100

Introduction to Business

3

0

3

PURPOSE: The Medical Laboratory Technology major is designed to prepare students for certification and employment as Medical Laboratory Technicians.

College Catalog 2016-2017

123

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Positions for Medical Laboratory Technicians are available in hospitals, private laboratories, physicians’ offices, health departments, and industrial medical laboratories. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission ADDITIONAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: Students interested in the Medical Laboratory Technology program must submit an application to the program director for consideration prior to the deadline for acceptance in the corresponding semester. Students should first enroll in the Pre-Medical Laboratory Technology (MDL) Career Studies Certificate (CSC) to complete the prerequisite courses. In order to be officially accepted into the MDL program, applicants will need to fulfill certain prerequisites included in the CSC and complete and submit an MDL application packet to the program director for consideration. Admission to the MDL program is competitive, and only a limited number of students will be accepted. Fully-qualified students will be ranked according to GPA, prior degrees achieved, and a completed application packet. (See the program application packet for full explanation of ranking of applicants.) A minimum GPA of 2.5 is required for consideration. Completion of the Pre-Medical Laboratory Technology CSC does not guarantee admission to the AAS degree. See the following links for additional material:

transfusion medicine, microbiology, urine and body fluid analysis, and laboratory operations.  The level of analysis ranges from waived and point of care testing to complex testing encompassing all major areas of the clinical laboratory. The medical laboratory technician will have diverse functions in areas of pre-analytical, analytical, and postanalytical processes. The medical laboratory technician will have responsibilities for information processing, training, and quality control monitoring wherever clinical laboratory testing is performed.  STUDENT OUTCOMES FOR THE MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY AAS DEGREE: The educational experiences in the Reynolds Medical Laboratory Technology program are designed to ensure that students are well prepared to enter the profession of medical laboratory technology and continue to learn throughout their professional career. At career entry, the medical lab technician will be proficient in performing a wide range of tests in areas, such as hematology, clinical chemistry, immunohematology, microbiology, serology/ immunology, coagulation, and urinalysis. At the completion of the Reynolds program, graduates will be able to 1. Exhibit patient confidentiality within HIPAA parameters. 2. Demonstrate consistent safe practice within industry level safety standards 3. Demonstrate job entry level precision and accuracy in performing procedures. 4. Formulate accurate reports within industry level reporting parameters. 5. Analyze and record test and quality control data within industry level accuracy standards. 6. Distinguish reportable vs. not reportable test results using established industry criteria. 7. Troubleshoot non-reportable test results 8. Discuss laboratory testing in terms of theory, technique, quality control, and interpretation. 9. Perform routine testing of adult, infant, and geriatric patient samples in specified rotations.

Medical Laboratory Technology Application packet: reynolds.edu/ _onlinecatalog/documents/MDL-Application-Packet.pdf Medical Laboratory Technology Student Handbook 2015-2016: reynolds.edu/_onlinecatalog/documents/MLTStudent-Handbook-2015-2016.pdf PROGRAM NOTES: Students admitted to this program will be approved for entry into major/clinical courses (MDL 101 and higher) when they have satisfied the following: 1. Students must meet all Essential Skills Requirements. 2. Completion (or near completion) of the Pre-Medical Laboratory Technology CSC is required. Transfer students must declare the Pre-Medical Laboratory Technology CSC as their major. 3. A criminal background check, drug screen, and documentation of immunizations are required prior to placement for clinical rotations. 4. Official transcripts from all previously attended colleges must be submitted to Central Admissions and Records. 5. The program application form must be submitted. 6. The program is open to qualified students who provide evidence of interest, aptitude, and motivation in the areas of both medical laboratory science and direct patient contact. 

ANNUAL PROGRAM STATISTICS:   ASCP BOC

124

2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 3-YEAR AVG.

83%

86%

80%

Available 83% 2016

---

24%

11%

0%

18

27

23

15

1

Exam

Attrition

12%

2

Rate

# Graduated

25

3

 

The National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Science Standards for Accreditation, proving the following set of entrylevel competencies (p. 17, Standards for Accreditation):  Description of Entry-Level Competencies for the Medical Laboratory Technician: The medical laboratory technician will possess the entry-level competencies necessary to perform routine clinical laboratory tests in areas, such as clinical chemistry, hematology/hemostasis, immunology, immunohematology/

2011-12



Graduation Rate

 

76%

Graduate Placement Rate

 

89%

89% 4

87%

5

100%

88%

6

90%

93%

st

Pass within 1  year of program completion

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 2 

Based on year 2



11 to graduate Summer/Fall 



2 not looking/1 status unknown; 100% when this is discounted 



3 status unknown;100% when this is discounted



1 status unknown; 100% when this is discounted

ESSENTIAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS: Students entering the MDL program must possess the following skills: •



• • • •



• •

Sufficient eyesight, including color vision, to observe microscopic cells and features within cells, read records, manipulate equipment, and visually read procedures, graphs, and test results. Sufficient hearing to communicate with patients and members of the health care delivery team, monitor patients using electronic equipment, and hear necessary sounds during operation of equipment. Satisfactory speaking, reading, and writing skills to effectively communicate in English in a timely manner. Sufficient gross and fine motor coordination to exhibit excellent eye-hand coordination and dexterity to manipulate equipment. Sufficient ability to lift, stoop, or bend in the delivery of safe laboratory testing. Satisfactory physical strength and endurance to be on feet for extended periods and to move heavy equipment and supplies. Sitting, walking, bending, and reaching motions are also requirements of most positions. Satisfactory intellectual, emotional, and psychological health and functioning to ensure patient safety and to exercise independent judgment and discretion in performing assigned tasks. Satisfactory time management of multiple priorities and stimuli to operate in fast-paced environments. Sufficient analysis, synthesis, and comprehension skills to follow detailed instructions and effectively operate in a laboratory setting.

Upon satisfactory completion of the five-semester program, the graduate will be eligible to take the Medical Laboratory Technology registry examinations (e.g., ASCP, AMT, or equivalent) for national certification. This exam is not a requirement for graduation; however, it is strongly recommended and may be required for employment, depending upon the employer. The MDL classes may be taken for retraining by certified technologists who have been out of the field for a period of time. Permission of the program head is required prior to registration. Courses in the program are offered on campus as well as via distance learning with an in-person or proctor required. Students in the distance program must attend mandatory laboratory classes offered at the distance learning sites. Tests may be taken at an approved testing center as determined by the faculty member and the program head. PROGRESSION THROUGH THE PROGRAM: The college offers this program in affiliation with the healthcare agencies and practitioners in the communities the college serves. The college relies on its community affiliates to provide clinical education opportunities for its students, expert clinical preceptors, and course instructors for many courses. The often rapid changes in healthcare law, standards of practice, technology, and content of credentialing examinations increasingly necessitate sudden changes in the program’s course content, policies, procedures, and course scheduling. As a result, the college cannot guarantee every student continuous and uninterrupted clinical and course instruction as outlined in the printed catalog curriculum for this program. Circumstances beyond the control of the college may necessitate the postponement of course offerings or changes in the sequencing and/or location of scheduled courses or clinical assignments. Additionally, the college may have to change the instructor for courses after instruction has started. Financial Requirements: In addition to the regular college tuition and fees, the Medical Laboratory program requires the items listed below:

The program provides opportunities for advanced placement based on evaluation of transcripts, clinical work experience, and training in other accredited medical laboratory education programs. Individuals interested in advanced placement should confer with the program head. Students may be required to retake all MDL courses if a delay in the completion of the program is encountered. All students must pass a clinical practicum prior to placement in clinical rotations. Attendance during one summer session may be required.

Books and Supplies (varies):

$2,000.00

Uniforms and Shoes:

$200.00

Lab Tests and Immunizations (varies):

$150.00 - $300.00

Laboratory Coat:

$25.00

Background Check (varies):

$45.00

Drug Screen (varies):

$25.00

Any student who receives a final grade lower than “C” in any core course (MDL prefix) must repeat the course. Students failing to obtain “C” or better in any two MDL prefix courses will not be able to progress in the MDL program. Courses with the MDL prefix must be completed successfully prior to entering the final coordinated internship courses.

Travel to Clinical Affiliates

Variable

Note: An additional fee for the national registry examination is not a requirement for graduation and is not included above. The fee is approximately $200.00.

Malpractice insurance coverage will be furnished by the college. It is recommended that the student have appropriate health insurance. The student is responsible for covering the cost of medical care required while in the clinical setting. Students are responsible for securing any uniforms and lab coats required by the clinical site.

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit

College Catalog 2016-2017

125

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once.

MDL 281

Clinical Correlations (online course)

1

0

1

PROGRAM ACCREDITATION AND ADMINISTRATION: The Medical Laboratory Technology program is accredited by the National Accreditation Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, 5600 N River Rd, Suite 720, Rosemont, IL 60018 (773-714-8880 and [email protected]). The program director is D. Gayle Melberg, MS, MT (ASCP), an experienced medical laboratory scientist and Certified Medical Technologist.

MDL

Coordinated Practice in Blood Bank/Transfusion Medicine

0

8

2

Coordinated Practice in Clinical Chemistry

0

8

2

Coordinated Practice in Hematology

0

8

2

CURRICULUM:

MDL

Coordinated Practice in Microbiology

0

8

2

Coordinated Practice in Urinalysis/Serology/Coagulation

0

3

1

1

35

10

COURSE

TITLE

SDV 100* MTH 126 or MTH

1*

8

5,9

290

MDL 5,9

290

MDL 5,9

290

5,9

290

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

MDL 5,9

College Success Skills

1

0

1

290

Introduction to Mathematics for Allied Health

3

0

3

TOTAL

General Chemistry or College Chemistry I

3

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Medical Laboratory Technology

1*

163

2*

CHM 101 or CHM

3

4

2*

111

*

General Biology I

3

3

4

*

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

MDL 101

Introduction to Medical Laboratory Techniques

2

3

3

15

9

18

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

College Composition II

3

0

3

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

4

Clinical Hematology I

2

3

3

4

Clinical Microbiology I

2

4

3

BIO 101

TOTAL ITE 115

*

*

ENG 112

3*

___ ___ MDL 125 MDL 251

3*

___ ___

Personal Wellness Elective

TOTAL

0-2

0-4 2

MDL 190

Coordinated Practice in Phlebotomy

0

8

2

MDL 210

Immunology and Serology

2

3

3

___ ___ *

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

MDL 110

Urinalysis and Body Fluids

2

3

3

7

14

11

3

TOTAL 6

Blood Banking

2

5

4

7

Clinical Hematology II

2

3

3

7

Clinical Microbiology II

2

3

3

8

Clinical Chemistry and Instrumentation II

3

3

4

9

14

14

MDL 216

MDL 225 MDL 252

MDL 262 TOTAL

126

02.04.16

* This course is included in the Pre-Medical Laboratory Technology Career Studies Certificate. 1

MTH 126 meets the graduation requirement for the AAS degree in Medical Laboratory Technology. Students planning to pursue a four-year degree should take MTH 163. 2

CHM 101 meets the graduation requirement for the AAS degree in Medical Laboratory Technology. Students planning to pursue a four-year degree should take CHM 111. 3

A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 4

This course is offered only in the spring term.

5

13-15 7-11 17 5

70

For actual student contact laboratory hours per week for MDL 190 and MDL 290 courses, please refer to the course descriptions. 6

MDL 210 is a prerequisite or co-requisite for MDL 216.

7

This course is offered only in the fall term.

8

CHM 101 or CHM 111 is a prerequisite or co-requisite for MDL 262.

9

The final semester consists of clinical rotations with area hospitals or clinics.

Nursing Associate of Applied Science PURPOSE: The program in Nursing is designed to provide individuals from diverse backgrounds with a lifelong commitment to learning the nursing skills and knowledge needed to serve as a member of the interdisciplinary healthcare team. Upon satisfactory completion of the program, the student is eligible to apply for the licensing examination (NCLEX-RN) required to become a Registered Nurse.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Include registered nurse positions in hospitals, extended care facilities, physicians’ offices, and other comparable healthcare facilities and agencies ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission, and program-specific criteria PROGRAM NOTES: 1.

2. 3.

4.

5.

The State Board of Nursing has the authority to deny licensure to any applicant who has violated any of the provisions of 54.1-3007 of the Code of Virginia. Any student entering the Nursing program who has committed any illegal offenses other than minor traffic violations should discuss these matters with the coordinator of the Nursing program prior to admission for clarification. A background check is required to apply for the NCLEX-RN licensure exam. A criminal background check and drug screen are required of all entering students and, depending on the facility, random drug screens may occur. Inability of a student to be placed in a clinical site due to a negative background check or drug screening may result in an inability to progress in the nursing course and removal from the program. Students who have a break in their enrollment at the college need to meet the currently published admission requirements as well as the courses identified in the current curriculum. Students are recommended to meet with a nursing advisor. A non-break in enrollment is defined as enrollment in at least one course each spring and fall for continuous progression. The program will be transitioning to a Virginia Community College System common nursing curriculum in Fall 2017.  The revised curriculum (1) will be scheduled predominantly in 16-week format; (2) may result in changes in general education course requirements; (3) may result in changes to the application process and criteria; and (4) may eliminate any summer nursing course offerings. It is critical that prospective students monitor the program’s web page available through the Reynolds.edu site.

Student Outcomes for the Nursing AAS Degree:

6. Implement sound clinical judgment based on knowledge and science, critical thinking, and evidence-based practice to achieve positive client outcomes. 7. Design client, family, and community education that incorporates effective teaching and learning principles and promotes positive client outcomes. 8. Collaborate with the interdisciplinary healthcare team to promote continuity of care and improve client outcomes. 9. Apply leadership and management principles to provide cost-effective care and promote quality improvement. 10. Synthesize the use of information and technology to communicate, manage knowledge, and support decisionmaking. Admission to the Nursing program is competitive, and only a limited number of students will be accepted. Fully-qualified students will be ranked according to Kaplan Nursing Admission Test achievement and a complete application. Due to the high demand for nurses, budget constraints, and faculty shortage, there are a limited number of seats, and the program routinely receives more applications than can be accepted. For this reason, it is imperative that applications be complete, that all procedures be followed, and that applicants prepare themselves academically to be competitive in the review process.  Application requirements are the following: 1. 2. 3. 4.

5.

Students who complete the Nursing AAS degree will be expected to 1. 2.

3. 4. 5.

Practice within the legal, ethical, and regulatory boundaries of professional nursing, assuming accountability for the quality of nursing care provided to individuals and families. Demonstrate commitment to excellence by maintaining professional integrity and competency through reflection, self-assessment, self-care, and lifelong learning as a professional nurse, healthcare team member, and citizen. Advocate for and deliver holistic client-centered nursing care based on principles of the therapeutic relationship. Apply the nursing process to meet the health needs of diverse individuals, families, and groups across the life span in structured settings. Minimize client harm and promote safe care through individual performance and system integrity.

College Catalog 2016-2017

6.

7.

8.

Submission of official high school transcript, GED, or certificate of completion of home schooling, and college (if applicable) transcripts to Central Admissions and Records. Completion of one unit of high school biology with a grade of “C” or better; BIO 1 at Reynolds is the high school equivalent course. Completion of one unit of high school chemistry with a grade of “C” or better; CHM 1 at Reynolds is the high school equivalent course. Completion of one unit of high school or college algebra with a grade of “C” or better. Applicants who do not have high school algebra with a grade of "C" or above can complete this requirement by passing MTE modules 1 through 6 at Reynolds. Completion of Reynolds’ English and mathematics placement tests and all required developmental courses based on the test results. MTE 3 on the math placement test is required for enrollment in MTH 126. Please see the information titled Placement Test Waivers in the Admission and Enrollment section of the College Catalog for other waiver criteria. Receipt of a “C” grade or better in general education courses taken at Reynolds and any college courses transferred from another institution to meet the Nursing AAS degree’s curriculum requirements. Completion of the Kaplan Nursing Admission Test with a reading score of at least 73 percent, math score of at least 75 percent, science score of at least 50 percent, and a writing score of at least 45 percent. Dates and times are provided at reynolds.edu/get_started/programs/snah/ announcements.aspx. The Kaplan Nurse Admission Test may be repeated once.  A two-year interval is required once the test has been taken twice. Cumulative GPA of 2.5.

127

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 9. Students must participate in an information session within six (6) months of applying to the program. These mandatory information sessions are scheduled periodically throughout the semester. Dates and times are provided at reynolds.edu/get_started/programs/snah/ announcements.aspx. 10. Admission will be ranked based on Kaplan admission scores. The required math score is weighted 30 percent, the reading score is weighted 30 percent, the science score is weighted 30 percent, and the writing score is weighted 10 percent. 11. Students must have completed 11 credits of general education courses with a grade of “C” or above: BIO 141, ENG 111, SDV 100, and MTH 126. 12. Students are eligible for progression to the next semester at the conclusion of each course in the program based on successful completion of the prerequisite and co-requisite courses. 13. Non-nursing courses must be completed prior to or concurrent with the approved curriculum sequence. 14. Once admitted, PSY 230, BIO 142, ITE 115, SOC 200, and a humanities/fine arts elective must be completed prior to or within the identified semester with the co-requisite nursing courses. 15. A minimum grade of “C” is required in each course within the program of study. Students receiving less than “C” in a general education course will be unable to continue in the Nursing program until the grade requirement is met. Qualified applicants who were not admitted may reapply for admission to the Nursing AAS degree.

Transfer students from other nursing programs may be accepted on a space available basis. 1.

The Nursing Admission and Transfer Committee will review these applications. Applicants must demonstrate that nursing courses, with corresponding credits, were completed within the previous 12 months. 2. Nursing transfer applicants must have a written statement indicating that they are in good standing and eligible to return to the previous institution. EXPECTATIONS: The student is required to complete a sequence of courses and learning experiences provided at the college and selected community agencies, such as acute care (hospitals) or long-term care facilities, clinics, or comparable agencies and facilities. During these experiences, the nursing faculty will observe, monitor, and evaluate the student’s ability to achieve program outcomes through direct patient care. CLINICAL CONTRACTS: Individual contracts are in effect with each affiliate clinical agency, and these contracts differ in requirements for students. In general, contracts include the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

FUNCTIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS: Students entering the Nursing program must possess the following functional skills: • •

• • • • •

Sufficient eyesight to observe patients, read records, manipulate equipment, and visually monitor patients in dim light. Sufficient hearing to communicate with patients and members of a healthcare delivery team, monitor patients using electronic equipment, hear necessary sounds during operation of equipment, and hear a patient whispering. Satisfactory speaking, reading, and writing skills to effectively communicate in English in a timely manner. Sufficient bilateral finger dexterity to manipulate equipment. Ability to lift, stoop, or bend in the delivery of safe nursing care. Satisfactory physical strength and endurance to be on one’s feet for extended periods and to move immobile patients. Satisfactory intellectual and emotional functioning to ensure patient safety and to exercise independent judgment and discretion in performing assigned tasks.

Application Deadlines for Full-time Day Option: • •

Fall start: 3rd Monday in May Spring start: 3rd Monday in September

TRANSFER OPTIONS: Applicants seeking to transfer into the Nursing AAS program are required to meet all admission requirements.

128

6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

Clinical agencies reserve the right to dismiss a student from their agency at any time with due cause. This will be done with advance notice except in an emergency. Student must wear the proper uniform. Student must follow published hospital policies. Student must meet health and immunizations requirements. Student releases the facility, its agents, and its employees from any liability for any injury or death to self or damage to personal property arising out of the clinical agreement or use of the facility. (Assessment of Risk document is signed and on file once the student is accepted into the program.) Student is financially responsible for any medical care required while in the clinical setting. Student must have a current American Heart Association CPR BLS for Health Care Provider Certification. Student must complete a criminal background check and drug screen, which may be repeated during the program of study. Student must attend healthcare agency orientation as scheduled to remain enrolled in a clinical nursing course. Student must submit required clinical documents with each clinical rotation. A student who does not meet published deadlines for submission forfeits his/her enrollment. If a student is dismissed by a clinical facility, alternate placement may require disclosure of information related to the dismissal.  The student must consent to disclosure.

Contracts for each agency are available in the School of Nursing and Allied Health Office in the Division Office and may be reviewed by students upon request. FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS: In addition to the regular college tuition and fees, the Nursing program requires the following: Uniforms, Shoes, and Stethoscope

$340.00

Special Testing

$500.00

Books and Supplies

$1,500.00

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Physical (student’s own physician) -- varies depending on health insurance coverage

$500.00

NCLEX-RN Application

$400.00

Background Check (CORI), Drug Screening, and Rechecks

$165.00

These costs are approximate and subject to change. The student should also consider transportation and parking costs for clinical assignments. NURSING STUDENT HANDBOOK: Please see http:// www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/documents/RN-StudentHandbook.pdf to view the Nursing Student Handbook. PROGRESSION THROUGH THE PROGRAM: Reynolds offers this program in affiliation with the healthcare agencies and practitioners in the communities the college serves and relies on its community affiliates to provide clinical education opportunities for its many courses. The rapid changes in healthcare law, standards of practice, technology, content of credentialing examinations, and availability of qualified faculty increasingly necessitate sudden changes in the program’s course content, policies, procedures, and course scheduling. As a result, the college cannot guarantee every student continuous and uninterrupted clinical and course instruction as outlined in the printed catalog curriculum for this program. Circumstances beyond the control of the college may necessitate the postponement of course offerings or changes in the sequencing and/or location of scheduled courses or clinical assignments. Additionally, the college may have to change the instructor for courses after instruction has started. If a student is dismissed by a clinical facility, alternate placement may require disclosure of information related to the dismissal.  The student must consent to disclosure.    CONTINUATION IN THE PROGRAM: • • • •

• • •

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0. Students must achieve a course grade of at least “C” (80) in each nursing course and at least “C” in each non-nursing course to progress through the Nursing AAS degree. The clinical portion of designated nursing courses is evaluated as "Pass/Fail." A student who does not meet the clinical learning outcomes will fail the course. Students may take some general education courses with nursing courses. Students are eligible for progression to the next semester at the conclusion of each course in the program based on successful completion of the prerequisite and co-requisite courses. Students who fail any two nursing courses or are not successful after two attempts (withdraw or fail) in the same course may not continue in the Nursing program. Students may enroll in only one clinical nursing course at a time. Students who fail clinical based on any aspect of professional behavior will not be eligible for re-admission. Application to the Reynolds Practical Nursing program may be at risk.

College Catalog 2016-2017

PROGRESSION STATUS: Reynolds has entered into an implied contract with all accepted Nursing program students via the Reynolds catalog. The catalog indicates that once accepted into the Nursing program a student can complete the program within two years, assuming the student attends four consecutive semesters. (Summer is a session, not a semester.) Continuation in the program is conditional upon those factors identified in the “Progression through the Program” statement. Progression 1 students are those who have never failed, dropped, withdrawn, or taken a leave of absence for any reason. Progression 1 students may register for any available space in a course for which they are eligible during the assigned registration period. Progression 2 students are those who have withdrawn, failed, or taken a leave of absence. These students have stopped program progress and will be enrolled based on a random lottery drawing for available seats. Progression 2 students will not participate in the online registration process. The Nursing AAS degree’s Promotion and Graduation Committee will place these students via a random lottery drawing into available seats. Progression 2 students will return to Progression 1 status after successful completion of the course from which they withdrew or failed. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by successfully passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. Either the course or competency exam must be completed prior to enrollment in Level III courses. NCLEX-RN Licensure Examination Pass Rates for Reynolds Nursing AAS Graduates: Reynolds Nursing Graduates' pass rates for the NCLEX-RN licensure examination are provided below for 2009 - 2015.  Year

Program Yearly Pass Rates

 

AAS in Nursing (traditional)

LPN- AAS in Nursing (traditional)

Part-Time LPN-AAS in Nursing

2011

95.08

NA*

NA*

2012

96.21

NA*

NA*

2013

81.00

100

92.00

2014

88.04

NA*

87.50

2015 (1/1/15 – 9/30/15)

92.54

66.67

NA*

*NA = No graduates in this category tested that year PROGRAM ACCREDITATION: The program is

129

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE • •

approved by the Virginia State Board of Nursing, 9960 Mayland Drive, Suite 300, Henrico, VA 23233-1463, (804) 367-4515, and accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). The Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing may be contacted at 3343 Peachtree Rd. NE, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA 30326, (404) 975-5000. 

TOTAL

COURSE

TITLE

15

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Nursing

15 69

* This course is included in the Pre-Nursing Career Studies Certificate. 1

CURRICULUM:

10

Students are encouraged to pursue a higher-level math to meet

this curriculum requirement that will also meet the requirement

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Prerequisites for Application

for a BSN degree.  MTH 146, MTH 163, MTH 166, or MTH 240 can be substituted for MTH 126.  MTH 146 or MTH 240 are the more commonly required courses for a BSN degree.  Math placement

MTH 126*

Mathematics for Allied Health

3

0

3

levels or prerequisites must be satisfied for enrollment in higher-

ENG 111*

College Composition

3

0

3

level math courses.

SDV 100*

College Success Skills

1

0

1

2

4

met by one of the following:  high school biology and chemistry

1

BIO 141*

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 I

2

TOTAL

10

3

within the past seven (7) years, or achievement of a score

3

11

Semester 1 BIO 142* 3,4

NUR 111

Pre-requisites for BIO 141 for Pre-Nursing CSC students can be

of 45% or higher on the science section of the TEAS Test, or completing BIO 101 with a grade of C or above. CPR certification (American Heart Association, “BLS for the

3

Nursing I

5

9

8



8

12

12

requirement.

TOTAL

4

3

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 II

Health Care Provider”) is required prior to NUR 111.

Semester 2



NUR 111 fulfills the general education personal wellness

See the list of approved general education electives

PSY 230*

Developmental Psychology

3

0

3

(humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics,

NUR 226

Health Assessment

2

3

3

science, and personal wellness) provided in the General

NUR 108

Nursing Principles and Concepts I

3

6

5

NUR 245

Maternal/Newborn Nursing

2

6

4

10

15

15

TOTAL Semester 3 SOC 200*

General Sociology

3

0

3

ITE 115*

Introduction to Computer Concepts and Applications

3

0

3

NUR 109

Nursing Principles and Concepts II

3

9

6

NUR 247

Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing

2

6

4

11

15

16

TOTAL Semester 4 _____*

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

NUR 246

Parent/Child Nursing

2

6

4

NUR 208

Acute Medical-Surgical Nursing

3

9

6

NUR 254

Dimensions of Professional Nursing

1

0

1

Seminar and Project: Leadership and Preparation for Practice

1

0

1

5

NUR 298

130

6

Education section of the College Catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design or see faculty advisor. 6

NUR 298 must be taken as a final course in the Nursing

program.

Nursing - LPN to Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing PURPOSE: The LPN to AAS degree in Nursing is designed to provide LPNs the opportunity to earn an AAS degree in Nursing. Upon satisfactory completion of the program outcomes, the graduate will be eligible to make application to take the NCLEXRN licensure exam to become a Registered Nurse. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission, and program-specific criteria. PROGRAM NOTES: 1.

The State Board of Nursing has the authority to deny licensure to any applicant who has violated any of the provisions of 54.1-3007 of the Code of Virginia. Any student entering the Nursing program who has committed any illegal offenses other than minor traffic violations should discuss these matters with the coordinator of the Nursing program prior to admission for clarification. A background check is required for NCLEX-RN application.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 2. A criminal background check and drug screen are required of all entering students and, depending on the facility, random drug screens may occur. 3. Inability of a student to be placed in a clinical site due to a negative background check or drug screening may result in an inability to progress in the nursing course and removal from the program. 4. Students who have a break in their enrollment at the college need to meet the currently published admission requirements as well as the courses identified in the current curriculum. It is recommended that students meet with a nursing advisor. A non-break in enrollment is enrollment in at least one course each spring and fall for continuous progression. 5. The program will be transitioning to a Virginia Community College System common nursing curriculum in Fall 2017.  The revised curriculum will: (1) be predominantly scheduled in 16 week courses; (2) may result in changes in general education course requirements; (3) may result in changes to the application process and criteria; and (4) may eliminate any summer nursing course offerings. It is critical that prospective students monitor the program’s web page available through the reynolds.edu site. Reynolds offers part-time evening/weekend and full-time LPN to AAS in Nursing degree options. •



The full-time option is offered during the day and typically admits students in the spring and fall if a sufficient qualified applicant pool is identified. This option is designed for students who do not have to work full-time and can be completed in two academic years (four semesters). The part-time evening/weekend option anticipates an admission cycle each spring. The evening/weekend option is structured for a student to progress sequentially over 29 months. This option was established to facilitate the student who has family and employment obligations and seeks a student commitment of approximately 10 to 14 hours per week of class and clinical experiences.

Student Outcomes for Nursing AAS Degree (LPN to AAS in Nursing):

6. Implement sound clinical judgment based on knowledge and science, critical thinking, and evidence-based practice to achieve positive client outcomes. 7. Design client, family, and community education that incorporates effective teaching and learning principles and promotes positive client outcomes. 8. Collaborate with the interdisciplinary healthcare team to promote continuity of care and improve client outcomes. 9. Apply leadership and management principles to provide cost-effective care and promote quality improvement. 10. Synthesize the use of information and technology to communicate, manage knowledge, and support decisionmaking. Application requirements are the following: 1. 2. 3. 4.

5.

6.

7.

Students who complete the Nursing AAS degree will be expected to 1. 2.

3. 4. 5.

Practice within the legal, ethical, and regulatory boundaries of professional nursing, assuming accountability for the quality of nursing care provided to individuals and families. Demonstrate commitment to excellence by maintaining professional integrity and competency through reflection, self-assessment, self-care, and lifelong learning as a professional nurse, healthcare team member, and citizen. Advocate for and deliver holistic client-centered nursing care based on principles of the therapeutic relationship. Apply the nursing process to meet the health needs of diverse individuals, families, and groups across the life span in structured settings. Minimize client harm and promote safe care through individual performance and system integrity.

College Catalog 2016-2017

8. 9. 10.

11.

Submission of official high school transcript, GED, or certificate of completion of home schooling, and college (if applicable) transcripts to Central Admissions and Records. Completion of one unit of high school biology with a grade of “C” or better; BIO 1 at Reynolds is the high school equivalent course. Completion of one unit of high school chemistry with a grade of “C” or better; CHM 1 at Reynolds is the high school equivalent course. Completion of one unit of high school or college algebra with a grade of “C” or better. Applicants who do not have high school algebra with a grade of “C” or better can complete this requirement by passing MTE modules 1 through 6 at Reynolds. Completion of Reynolds’ English and mathematics placement tests and all required developmental courses based on the test results. MTE 3 on the math placement test is required for MTH 126. Please see the information titled Placement Test Waivers in the Admission and Enrollment section of the College Catalog for other waiver criteria. A minimum grade of “C” is required in all courses. Students receiving less than “C” in a general education course will be unable to continue in the Nursing program until the grade requirement is met. Completion of the Kaplan Nursing Admission Test with a reading score of at least 73 percent, math score of at least 75 percent, science score of at least 50 percent, and a writing score of at least 45 percent. The Kaplan Nurse Admission Test may be repeated once.  A two-year interval is required once the test has been taken twice. Cumulative GPA of 2.5. Unencumbered/unrestricted license as a Practical Nurse in the state of Virginia. This status must be maintained throughout the student’s enrollment in the program. Students must participate in an information session within six (6) months of applying to the program. These mandatory information sessions are scheduled periodically throughout the semester. Dates and times are provided at reynolds.edu/get_started/programs/snah/ announcements.aspx. Admission will be ranked on Kaplan admission scores. The required math, reading, and science scores are each weighted 30 percent.  The writing score is weighted 10 percent.

131

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 12. Students must have completed 11 credits of general education courses with a grade of "C" or above: BIO 141, ENG 111, SDV 100, and MTH 126. 13. Students are eligible for progression to the next semester at the conclusion of each course in the program based on successful completion of the prerequisite and co-requisite courses. 14. Non-nursing courses must be completed prior to or concurrent with the approved curriculum sequence. 15. Once admitted, PSY 230, BIO 142, ITE 115, SOC 200, and a humanities/fine arts elective must be completed prior to or within the identified semester with the co-requisite nursing courses. Qualified applicants who were not admitted may reapply for admission to the Nursing AAS degree program. FUNCTIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS: Students entering the LPN to AAS degree in Nursing must possess the following functional skills: • •

• • • • •

Sufficient eyesight to observe patients, read records, manipulate equipment, and visually monitor patients in dim light. Sufficient hearing to communicate with patients and members of a healthcare delivery team, monitor patients using electronic equipment, hear necessary sounds during operation of equipment, and hear a patient whispering. Satisfactory speaking, reading, and writing skills to effectively communicate in English in a timely manner. Sufficient bilateral finger dexterity to manipulate equipment. Ability to lift, stoop, or bend in the delivery of safe nursing care. Satisfactory physical strength and endurance to be on one’s feet for extended periods and to move immobile patients. Satisfactory intellectual and emotional functioning to ensure patient safety and to exercise independent judgment and discretion in performing assigned tasks.

CLINICAL CONTRACTS: Individual contracts are in effect with each affiliate clinical agency, and these contracts differ in requirements for students. In general, contracts include the following: • • • • •

• • • • • •

Clinical agencies reserve the right to dismiss a student from their agency at any time with due cause. This will be done with advance notice except in an emergency. Student must wear the proper uniform. Student must follow published hospital policies. Student must meet health and immunizations requirements. Student releases the facility, its agents, and its employees from any liability for any injury or death to self or damage to personal property arising out of the clinical agreement or use of the facility. (Assessment of Risk document is signed and on file once accepted into the program.) Student is financially responsible for any medical care required while in the clinical setting. Student must have a current American Heart Association CPR BLS for Health Care Provider Certification. Student must complete a criminal background check and drug screen which may be repeated during the program of study. Student must attend healthcare agency orientation as scheduled to remain enrolled in a clinical nursing course. Student must submit required clinical documents with each clinical rotation. A student who does not meet published deadlines for submission forfeits his/her enrollment. If a student is dismissed by a clinical facility, alternate placement may require disclosure of information related to the dismissal.  The student must consent to disclosure.

Contracts for each agency are available in the School of Nursing and Allied Health Office in the Division Office and may be reviewed by students upon request. FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS: In addition to the regular college tuition and fees, the Nursing program requires the following: Uniforms, Shoes, and Stethoscope

$340.00

Note: If applying to more than one program, a separate application is required.

Special Testing

$500.00

Books and Supplies

$1,500.00

Full-time Day

Physical (student’s own physician) -- varies depending on health insurance coverage

$500.00

NCLEX-RN Application

$400.00

Background Check (CORI), Drug Screening, and Rechecks

$165.00

Application Deadlines for LPN to AAS in Nursing:

• •

Fall start: 3rd Monday in May Spring start: 3rd Monday in September

Part-time Evening and Weekend •

Spring start: 3rd Monday in September

EXPECTATIONS: The student is required to complete a sequence of courses and learning experiences provided at the college and selected community agencies, such as acute care (hospitals), rehabilitation or long-term care facilities, clinics, or comparable agencies and facilities. During these experiences, the Nursing faculty will observe, monitor, and evaluate the student’s ability to achieve program outcomes through direct patient care experiences.

132

These costs are approximate and subject to change. The student should also consider transportation and parking costs for clinical assignments. PROGRESSION THROUGH THE PROGRAM: Reynolds offers this program in affiliation with the healthcare agencies and practitioners in the communities the college serves and relies on its community affiliates to provide clinical education

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS opportunities for its many courses. The rapid changes in healthcare law, standards of practice, technology, content of credentialing examinations, and availability of qualified faculty increasingly necessitate sudden changes in the program’s course content, policies, procedures, and course scheduling. As a result, the college cannot guarantee every student continuous and uninterrupted clinical and course instruction as outlined in the printed catalog curriculum for this program. Circumstances beyond the control of the college may necessitate the postponement of course offerings or changes in the sequencing and/or location of scheduled courses or clinical assignments. Additionally, the college may have to change the instructor for courses after instruction has started. CONTINUATION IN THE PROGRAM: • • • •

• • •

Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0. Students must achieve a course grade of at least “C” (80) in each nursing course and at least “C” in each non-nursing course to progress through the Nursing AAS degree. The clinical portion of designated nursing courses is evaluated as “Pass/Fail.” A student who does not meet the clinical learning outcomes will fail the course. Students may take some general education courses with nursing courses. Students are eligible for progression to the next semester at the conclusion of each course in the program based on successful completion of the prerequisite and co-requisite courses. Students who fail any two nursing courses or are not successful after two attempts (withdraw or fail) in the same course may not continue in the Nursing program. Students may enroll in only one clinical nursing course at a time. Students who fail clinical based on any aspect of professional behavior will not be eligible for re-admission. Application to the Reynolds Practical Nursing program may be at risk.

PROGRESSION STATUS: Reynolds has entered into an implied contract with all accepted Nursing program students via the Reynolds catalog. The catalog indicates that once accepted into the Nursing program a student can complete the program within two years, assuming the student attends four consecutive semesters. (Summer is a session, not a semester.) Continuation in the program is conditional upon those factors identified in the “Progression through the Program” statement. Progression 1 students are those who have never failed, dropped, withdrawn, or taken a leave of absence for any reason. Progression 1 students may register for any available space in a course for which they are eligible during the assigned registration period. Progression 2 students are those who have withdrawn, failed, or taken a leave of absence. These students have stopped program progress and will be enrolled based on a random lottery drawing for available seats. Progression 2 students will not participate in the online registration process. The Nursing AAS degree’s Promotion and Graduation Committee will place these students via a random lottery drawing into available seats. Progression 2 students will return to Progression 1 status after successful completion of the course from which they withdrew or failed.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by successfully passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. Either the course or competency exam must be completed prior to enrollment in Level III courses. NCLEX-RN Licensure Examination Pass Rates for Reynolds Nursing AAS Graduates: Reynolds Nursing Graduates' pass rates for the NCLEX-RN licensure examination are provided below for 2009 - 2015. Year

Program Yearly Pass Rates

 

AAS in Nursing (traditional)

LPN- AAS in Nursing (traditional)

Part-Time LPN-AAS in Nursing

2011

95.08

NA*

NA*

2012

96.21

NA*

NA*

2013

81.00

100

92.00

2014

88.04

NA*

87.50

2015 (1/1/15 – 9/30/15)

92.54

66.67

NA*

*NA = No graduates in this category tested that year PROGRAM ACCREDITATION: The program is • •

approved by the Virginia State Board of Nursing, 9960 Mayland Drive, Suite 300, Henrico, VA 23233-1463, (804) 367-4515; and accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). The Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing may be contacted at 3343 Peachtree Rd. NE, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA 30326, (404) 975-5000.

CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Prerequisites for Application MTH 126*

Mathematics for Allied Health

3

0

3

ENG 111*

College Composition

3

0

3

SDV 100*

College Success Skills

1

0

1

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 I

3

4

3

11

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 II

3

4

LPN in Transition

0

3

1

BIO 141*

2

TOTAL

10

Semester 1 BIO 142* NUR 115

3

3

133

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE NUR 226

Health Assessment

TOTAL

2

3

3

8

6

10

6

NUR 246 must be taken after successful completion of NUR 247. 7

NUR 298 must be taken as a final course in the Nursing program.

Semester 2

8

PSY 230*

Developmental Psychology

3

0

3

NUR 108

Nursing Principles and Concepts I

3

6

5

NUR 245

Maternal/Newborn Nursing

2

6

4

8

12

12

General Sociology

3

0

3

ITE 115*

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

COURSE

NUR 109

Nursing Principles and Concepts II

3

9

6

Prerequisites for Application

Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing

2

6

4

11

15

16

TOTAL

Students having an unrestricted license as an LPN in Virginia will receive five (5) credits by able for NUR 111.

  CURRICULUM SEQUENCE: The part-time curriculum sequence is presented in the table below. CURRICULUM:

Semester 3 SOC 200* 4

NUR 247 TOTAL

TITLE

MTH 126*

Mathematics for Allied Health

3

0

3

ENG 111*

College Composition

3

0

3

SDV 100*

College Success Skills

1

0

1

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 I

3

4

3

11

1

BIO 141*

Semester 4

2

5

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

6

Parent/Child Nursing

2

6

4

NUR 208

Acute Medical-Surgical Nursing

3

9

6

 

NUR 254

Dimensions of Professional Nursing

1

0

1

PART-TIME CURRICULUM SEQUENCE ONCE ACCEPTED:

Seminar and Project: Leadership and Preparation for Practice

1

0

1

COURSE

10

15

15

Semester 1 (Fall)

___ ___* NUR 246

NUR 298 TOTAL

7

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Nursing 

TOTAL

8

69

* This course is included in the Pre-Nursing Career Studies Certificate. 1 

10

BIO 142* NUR 115

3

NUR 226

TITLE

3

4

LPN in Transition

3

0

3

Health Assessment

2

3

3

8

6

10

TOTAL

2

Pre-requisites for BIO 141 for Pre-Nursing CSC students can be met by one of the following:  high school biology and chemistry within the past seven (7) years, or achievement of a score of 45% or higher on the science section of the TEAS Test, or completing BIO 101 with a grade of C or above.

Semester 2 (Fall)

3

TOTAL

CPR certification (American Heart Association, BLS for the Health Care Provider) is required prior to NUR 115. CSC 155 can be taken to meet this requirement.

5

See the list of approved general education electives (humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) provided in the General Education section of the College Catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

134

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 II

Students are encouraged to pursue a higher-level math to meet this curriculum requirement that will also meet the requirement for a BSN degree.  MTH 146, MTH 163, MTH 166, OR MTH 240 can be substituted for MTH 126.  MTH 146 or MTH 240 are the more commonly required courses for a BSN degree.  Math placement levels or prerequisites must be satisfied for enrollment in higherlevel math courses.

4

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Summer Session PSY 230*

Developmental Psychology

3

0

3

NUR 245

Maternal/Newborn Nursing

2

6

4

5

6

7

TOTAL NUR 108

Nursing Principles and Concepts I

3

6

5

SOC 200*

General Sociology

3

0

3

6

6

8

Semester 3 ITE 115*

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

NUR 109

Nursing Principles and Concepts II

3

9

6

6

9

9

4

TOTAL

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS and fitting of eyeglasses and contact lenses: surfacing, finishing, eyeglass dispensing, contact lens fitting, and dispensing.

Summer Session NUR 247 ___ ___*

5

Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing

2

6

4

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

5

6

7

Parent/Child Nursing

2

6

4

Dimensions of Professional Nursing

1

0

1

3

6

5

Acute Medical-Surgical Nursing

3

9

6

Seminar and Project: Leadership and Preparation for Practice

1

0

1

TOTAL

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Graduation from the program may lead to one of the following occupational goals: Optician, Private Practitioner, Ophthalmic Dispenser, Optical Laboratory Manager, Contact Lens Technician, Branch Manager, Optical Laboratory Technician, Ophthalmic Sales Representative, and Ophthalmic Research Technician.

Semester 4 (Fall) NUR 246

6

NUR 254 TOTAL

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students admitted into this program will be approved for entry into major/clinical courses (Optical Theory I or higher) when they have satisfied the following requirements:

Semester 5 (Spring) NUR 208 NUR 298

7

TOTAL

• •

4

9

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Nursing 

7 8

02.02.16 * This course is included in the Pre-Nursing Career Studies Certificate. 1

Students are encouraged to pursue a higher-level math to meet this curriculum requirement that will also meet the requirement for a BSN degree.  MTH 146, MTH 163, MTH 166, or MTH 240 can be substituted for MTH 126.  MTH 146 or MTH 240 are the more commonly required courses for a BSN degree.  Math placement levels or prerequisites must be satisfied for enrollment in higherlevel math courses. 2

 Pre-requisites for BIO 141 for Pre-Nursing CSC students can be met by one of the following:  high school biology and chemistry within the past seven (7) years, or achievement of a score of 45% or higher on the science section of the TEAS Test, or completing BIO 101 with a grade of C or above. 3

CPR certification (American Heart Association, “BLS for the Health Care Provider”) is required prior to NUR 115. 4

CSC 155 can be taken to meet this requirement.

5

See the list of approved general education electives (humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) provided in the General Education section of the College Catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 6

NUR 246 must be taken after successful completion of NUR 247. 7

NUR 298 must be taken as a final course in the Nursing program. 8

Students having an unrestricted license as an LPN in Virginia will receive five (5) credits by able for NUR 111.

Opticianry Associate of Applied Science PURPOSE: The Opticianry program is designed to prepare individuals in the art and science of all phases of the making

College Catalog 2016-2017



69

Completion of one unit of high school algebra with a grade of “C” or better or its equivalent (Reynolds MTE 3). Completion of all developmental coursework prescribed as a result of Reynolds placement tests. In order to be fully accepted into the Opticianry program, applicants must meet with the program head to review their records and to discuss the requirements of the program and a career in Opticianry.

It is also recommended, but not required, that students have completed one unit each of high school biology and physics. Students acquire direct patient-related practical skills by taking eyeglass and contact lens clinical coursework at clinical sites assisting customers. All students must complete an Assumption of Risk agreement prior to taking any clinical courses. Courses in the program are offered on campus as well as via distance learning with in-person or proctor required. Students in the distance program must attend mandatory clinical classes offered at an approved distance learning site. Exams must be taken at an approved testing center as determined by the program head. Students who receive a final grade lower than “71” in any of the Opticianry courses must obtain permission from the program head to continue the major in Opticianry. Graduation from this program prepares one for the licensing examination and contact lens fitting endorsement given by the Virginia State Board of Opticians. This accredited program is also approved by other states. PROGRAM OBJECTIVES FOR OPTICIANRY AAS DEGREE: Students who complete the Opticianry AAS degree will be expected to 1.

Demonstrate theoretical and technical optical knowledge at a level of a licensed optician in the state of Virginia and other states requiring accreditation with similar requirements. 2. Demonstrate clinical optical skills at a level of a licensed optician in the state of Virginia and other states requiring accreditation with similar requirements. 3. Demonstrate clinical competency in basic contact lens fitting. 4. Demonstrate entry-level business skills for the opticianry profession.

135

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS: In addition to the regular college tuition and fees, the following expenses may be required for the Opticianry program: • • • • • • • •

Eye examination (by the 4th semester) | $35-85 Personal pair of safety glasses | $15-50  (Non-Rx safety eyewear is available for on-campus labs.) White laboratory coat | $20-45 Name badge | $8-10 USB headset (for all online lecture courses) | $25-75 Mailing costs (for distance clinical courses only) | $ varies by location* Testing center fees (for distance clinical courses only) | $ varies by location Optical tools or equipment (for distance clinical courses only) | $ varies by location**

* Distance learning students are required to take proctored exams and complete projects to be sent back to the college throughout the curriculum. Students must have an approved proctor, and, if there is a fee, students are required to pay for the services they decide to use. **Distance learning students in a clinical setting must have access to specific optical tools and equipment in order to successfully complete coursework. Dependent upon the clinical site, students using off-campus locations may need to purchase tools or equipment if they do not have access to them at their approved location. NOTE: The above costs are approximate, clinical site dependent, and subject to change. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Those students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. This requirement must be satisfied by the end of the second semester to continue in the program. PROGRESSION THROUGH THE PROGRAM: The college offers this program in affiliation with the healthcare agencies and practitioners in the communities the college serves. The college relies on its community affiliates to provide clinical education opportunities for its students, expert clinical preceptors, and course instructors for many courses. The often rapid changes in healthcare law, standards of practice, technology, and content of credentialing examinations increasingly necessitate sudden changes in the program’s course content, policies, procedures, and course scheduling. As a result, the college cannot guarantee every student continuous and uninterrupted clinical and course instruction as outlined in the printed catalog curriculum for this program. Circumstances beyond the control of the college may necessitate the postponement of course offerings or changes in the sequencing and/or location of scheduled courses or clinical assignments. Additionally, the college may have to change the instructor for courses after instruction has started.

136

ANNUAL PERFORMANCE DATA FOR OPTICIANRY GRADUATES: The following table presents the pass rates on first attempt for certification/licensure exams and employment rates for Reynolds opticianry graduates for 2009-2015:  

2009 2010 2011

2012 2013 2014 2015

American Board of Opticianry (ABO)

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

National Contact Lens Examiners (NCLE)

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

Virginia State Board for Opticians

100% 100% 100% 100% 75%

Employment

70% 100% 95%

80% 88%

100% 100% 93%

100%

  ACCREDITATION: The Opticianry program is accredited by the Commission on Opticianry Accreditation, PO Box 592, Canton, NY 13617; [email protected]; 703-468-0566 voice. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB.  CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

MTH 126

Mathematics  for Allied Health

3

0

3

1

Optical Theory I

3

0

3

OPT 150

Optical Laboratory Theory I

3

0

3

OPT 152

Optical Laboratory Clinical I

0

6

3

10

6

13

OPT 121

TOTAL ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

OPT 122

Optical Theory II

3

0

3

OPT 151

Optical Laboratory Theory II

3

0

3

OPT 153

Optical Laboratory Clinical II

0

6

3

12

6

15

TOTAL ___ ___

Personal Wellness Elective

0-1

0-2

1

OPT 160

Optical Dispensing Theory I

3

0

3

OPT 165

Optical Dispensing Clinical I

0

4

2

OPT 273

Contact Lens Theory I

3

0

3

6-7

4-6 9

2

TOTAL ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

OPT 105

Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology of the Eye

3

0

3

OPT 260

Optical Dispensing Theory II

3

0

3

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS OPT 271

Optical Dispensing Clinical II

0

12

3

OPT 274

Contact Lens Theory II

3

0

3

TOTAL

12

12

15

OPT 154

Optical Business Management

3

0

3

OPT 280

Contact Lens Clinical

0

6

3

OPT 272

Optical Dispensing Clinical III

0

12

3

2

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

9

18

15

___ ___ ___ ___ TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Opticianry

67

02.02.16 1

 Math 126 is a prerequisite or co-requisite for OPT 121.

2

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog unde

Paralegal Studies Associate of Applied Science Specializations: General Practice Litigation PURPOSE: There is a need in the greater Richmond area and throughout Virginia for paralegals. There is a need to train those who are presently employed in legal secretarial or legal assistant positions who wish to become paralegals. The Paralegal Studies Associate of Applied Science degree is designed to meet these educational needs by preparing individuals to perform as legal assistants or paralegals under the supervision of an attorney. The program is approved by the American Bar Association. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Paralegal for private law firms, administrative agencies, other governmental agencies, mortgage companies, title insurance companies, and corporations ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: It is strongly recommended that students meet with the program head before registering for classes, or as early as possible in their first semester of enrollment. Students with developmental studies course recommendations resulting from the English placement test must complete those courses prior to admission to any Paralegal Studies (LGL) course. Students placed in co-requisites ENF 3 and ENG 111 must complete those courses either prior to or concurrently with LGL 110. Any student who receives a final grade lower than “C” in any of the courses in the Paralegal Studies curriculum must obtain permission from the program head to continue as a student in the Paralegal Studies program. Students will be required by

College Catalog 2016-2017

the program head to repeat LGL-prefix courses and ENG 111-112 courses where grades below “C” are received. Legal assistants, paralegals, and other non-lawyers are prohibited from practicing law without a license. Paralegals and legal assistants may not provide legal services directly to the public, except as permitted by law. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115, Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts. Students can also meet this requirement by successfully passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. TRANSFER OF LEGAL SPECIALTY COURSES: The Paralegal Studies program accepts the transfer of legal specialty course credits completed at other institutions as long as such institution is accredited by the appropriate regional accrediting body, such as the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. A legal specialty course is a course that (1) covers substantive law or legal procedures or process, (2) has been developed for paralegals, (3) emphasizes practical paralegal skills, and (4) meets other guidelines of the American Bar Association. The following courses are legal specialty courses: LGL 117 - Family Law, LGL 125 - Legal Research, LGL 126 - Legal Writing, LGL 216 - Trial Preparation and Discovery Practice, LGL 221 - E-Practice, LGL 222 - Information Technology for the Paralegal, LGL 226 - Real Estate Abstracting, LGL 228 - Real Estate Settlement Practicum, LGL 235 - Legal Aspects of Business Organizations, LGL 225 - Estate Planning and Probate, and LGL 238 - Bankruptcy.  Credits from another institution for legal specialty courses will only be awarded if delivered in a traditional format, meet the guidelines of a legal specialty course as defined by the American Bar Association, and approved by the Paralegal Studies program head. Students may have to submit their work product before approval will be granted. In all cases, the grade for such course must be “C” or better, and no such credit will be given to any courses awarded at an institution outside of the United States. No credit by examination or portfolio is allowed for legal specialty coursework, and no more than fifty percent (50%) of legal specialty credits required by the Paralegal Studies program shall be accepted for transfer credit. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

LGL 110

Introduction to Law and the Paralegal

3

0

3

LGL 117

Family Law

3

0

3

LGL 125

Legal Research

3

0

3

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

1

___ ___

137

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE 1

___ ___

Personal Wellness Elective

TOTAL

0-1

0-2

1

16-17 0-2 17

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

LGL 126

Legal Writing

3

0

3

LGL 218

Criminal Law

3

0

3

LGL 235

Legal Aspects of Business Organizations

3

0

3

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

18

0

18

1

___ ___ ITE 115

2

TOTAL

LGL 215

Torts

3

0

3

LGL 216

Trial Preparation and Discovery Practice

3

0

3

MTH 120

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

15

0

15

E-Practice

3

0

3

Administrative Practice and Procedure

3

0

3

LGL 290

Coordinated Internship

0

12

3

LGL 200

Ethics for the Paralegal

1

0

1

CST 100 or  CST 110

Principles of Public Speaking or Introduction to Speech Communication

3

0

3

Elective

3

0

3

13

12

16

TOTAL LGL 221

6

LGL 220 4

 

5

___ ___

CURRICULUM: General Practice Specialization COURSE

TOTAL

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

LGL 222

Information Technology for the Paralegal

3

0

3

MTH 120

Introduction to Mathematics

3

0

3

LGL 210

Virginia and Federal Procedure

3

0

3

LGL 228

Real Estate Settlement Practicum

3

0

3

CST 100 or  CST 110

Principles of Public Speaking or Introduction to Speech Communication

3

0

3

3

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Paralegal Studies, Litigation Specialization

66

02.02.16 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 2

 Keyboarding skills are a prerequisite for ITE 115.

3

 LGL 125 and ITE 115 are prerequisites for this course.

15

0

15

4

 Must be taken at the end of the program; approval of the program head is required.

LGL 225

Estate Planning and Probate

3

0

3

LGL 226

Real Estate Abstracting

3

0

3

Bankruptcy

3

0

3

LGL 290

Coordinated Internship

0

12

3

LGL 200

Ethics for the Paralegal

1

0

1

 Prior to selecting an elective, students planning to seek a bachelor’s degree should acquaint themselves with the requirements for the major at the college or university to which transfer is intended. Students in the Litigation Specialization should consider taking HLT 143, Medical Terminology, as their approved elective.

Elective

3

0

3

6

13

12

16

LGL 238 4

5

___ ___ TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for AAS Degree in Paralegal Studies, General Practice Specialization

66

5

 LGL 210 and LGL 216 are prerequisites for LGL 221.

Practical Nursing Certificate

  CURRICULUM: Litigation Specialization COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

LGL 222

Information Technology for the Paralegal

3

0

3

LGL 210

Virginia and Federal Procedure

3

0

3

3

138

PURPOSE: The Practical Nursing Certificate is designed to prepare a nurse who participates as an integral member of the nursing or health care team involved in health promotion and maintenance activities for the client. The practical nurse provides direct care for individual clients experiencing common, welldefined health problems with predictable outcomes, in structured health care settings with supervision. Upon satisfactory completion of the program, the student will be eligible to take the national examination for licensure as a Practical Nurse (LPN).

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Licensed Practical Nurse positions in long-term care, hospitals, physicians’ offices, and other comparable structured health care facilities and agencies ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students must have a high school diploma, GED, or certificate of completion of home schooling to apply to the Practical Nursing Certificate program. The following steps must be completed as part of the first stage of the application process: 1. 2. 3.

4.

5.

6.

Submit official high school transcript, GED, or certificate of completion of home schooling to Central Admissions and Records. Select the Pre-Practical Nursing Career Studies Certificate (plan code 221-157-02) as the choice of curriculum plan on the Application for Admission to the college. Submit official college transcripts, if applicable, to Central Admissions and Records. Courses taken at other colleges that contain equivalent content and credits may transfer to satisfy a program requirement. If a student has attended another VCCS college, a Request for an Evaluation of a VCCS Transcript form (#11-3006) must be submitted with the Application for Admission to the College. This form can be found under student forms on reynolds.edu. Complete Reynolds placement tests in English and mathematics and all developmental coursework prescribed as a result of the placement tests. The Practical Nursing program requires that students have the following competencies: (1) competency in BSK 1 and math essentials, MTE 1-3, as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent, and (2) competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of a college-level composition course. Attend an information session within eight (8) months of applying to the Practical Nursing Certificate. This is the only way to obtain an Application to the Practical Nursing program. Information session dates are posted online at http://www.reynolds.edu/get_started/programs/snah/ announcements.aspx. Submit a completed application to the Practical Nursing Admission Specialist. The application deadline for Fall 2016 is May 16, 2016. Students accepted will be notified of a mandatory orientation session to be scheduled during the summer. This class will begin the Practical Nursing curriculum in August 2016.

For applications to the Practical Nursing Certificate to be considered, the following requirements must be met: 1.

Completion of all required developmental courses based on placement test results. 2. Completion of BIO 141 and SDV 100 with a grade of “C” or above: While it is advisable that students complete all general education courses prior to applying for the Practical Nursing program, this is not required. Students are advised to evaluate their learning style, lifestyle, and family

College Catalog 2016-2017

and other commitments to determine the number of credits they can complete successfully in a given semester. 3. Successful completion of the Kaplan Pre-Admission Exam: Students must have a minimum score of 45 in reading and math and a minimum score of 35 in the science and writing areas to be eligible to apply to the program. Students who do not meet the minimum application Kaplan score on their first attempt are encouraged to meet with the program head. The program head will recommend remedial courses that may assist in the preparation for a second testing attempt. All applicants are limited to two (2) attempts on the Kaplan pre-admission test. A two-year interval is required before repeating this test. 4. Achievement of a minimum cumulative 2.5 GPA. Students must provide documentation of American Heart Association BLS Certification for Health Care Providers prior to beginning PNE 161, Nursing in Health Changes. HLT 105 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation meets this requirement. This training is also provided by several community providers. LEGAL REQUIREMENTS: The Virginia Board of Nursing has the authority to deny licensure to an applicant who has violated any of the provisions of 54-367.32 of the Code of Virginia. Any student entering the program who has committed illegal offenses other than minor traffic violations should discuss these matters with the program head for clarification prior to admission. Criminal background checks are required of all applicants to the Practical Nursing program. Inability of a student to be placed in a clinical site due to a negative background check will result in removal from the program. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF CLINICAL FACILITIES: Clinical facilities used by the program have additional requirements for students that include updated immunizations, dress codes, and compliance with professional standards. In general, contracts include the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8.

Clinical agencies reserve the right to dismiss a student from their agency at any time with due cause. This will be done with advance notice except in an emergency. Proper uniform must be worn. Published hospital policies must be followed. Immunizations must be current. The student releases the facility, its agents, and its employees from any liability for any injury or death to self or damage to personal property arising out of the clinical agreement or use of the facility. (Assumption of Risk document is signed and on file once the student is accepted into the program.) The student is financially responsible for any medical care that may be required while in the clinical setting. The student must have a current American Heart Association BLS Certification for Health Care Providers. A criminal background check and drug screen are required of all entering students and may be repeated during the program of study.

PRE-ENTRANCE HEALTH REQUIREMENT: Accepted students will receive copies of the required health forms during the mandatory orientation. Students must be free of any physical or mental condition that might adversely affect their performance in

139

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE clinical courses or as nurses. Required immunizations must be documented. Health forms must be completed and submitted on the first day of class. Validation of freedom from tuberculosis is required annually of all practical nursing students through skin testing or chest x-ray. Students who do not submit required health forms or do not meet the identified health standards or functional skills will lose their seat in the program.

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: All applicants to the Practical Nursing program must either pass the computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers at each campus, or successfully complete ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. Students who do not pass the exam after retaking it once must then complete ITE 115 or CSC 155.

FUNCTIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS: Students entering the Practical Nursing program must possess the following functional skills:

ESTIMATED PROGRAM COST:

1. 2.

3. 4. 5. 6.

Sufficient eyesight to observe patients, read records, manipulate equipment, and visually monitor patients in dim light. Sufficient hearing to communicate with patients and members of a health care delivery team, monitor patients using electronic equipment, and hear necessary sounds during operation of equipment. Satisfactory speaking, reading, and writing skills to effectively communicate in English in a timely manner. Sufficient bilateral finger dexterity to manipulate equipment. Ability to lift, stoop, or bend in the delivery of safe nursing care. Satisfactory intellectual and emotional functioning to ensure patient safety and to exercise independent judgment and discretion in performing assigned tasks.

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE POLICY: 1.

A minimum grade of "C" is required for all courses in the Practical Nursing curriculum.  A "C" is equal to 80% in courses carrying a PNE prefix. 2. Students must obtain permission from the program head to continue in the program under the following conditions: • repeating a nursing course with a grade below "C" • withdrawing form a nursing course for any reason 3. In accordance with VCCS policy, a student is limited to two attempts of the same course. 4. Additional policies for the program are listed in the Practical Nursing Student Handbook, which is given to students at the mandatory orientation. PROGRESSION THROUGH THE PROGRAM: The college offers this program in affiliation with the health care agencies and practitioners in the communities the college serves. The college relies on its community affiliates to provide clinical education opportunities for its students, expert clinical preceptors, and course instructors for many courses. The often rapid changes in health care law, standards of practice, technology, and content of credentialing examinations increasingly necessitate sudden changes in the program’s course content, policies, procedures, and course scheduling. As a result, the college cannot guarantee every student continuous and uninterrupted clinical and course instruction as outlined in the printed catalog curriculum for this program. Circumstances beyond the control of the college may necessitate the postponement of course offerings or changes in the sequencing and/or location of scheduled courses or clinical assignments. Additionally, the college may have to change the instructor for courses after instruction has started.

140

Tuition (46 credits @ 155.10/ credit)*

$7134.60

Books, equipment, supplies

800.00

Uniforms and shoes

220.00

Required standardized test (HESI)

350.00

Health requirements

100.00 – 400.00

CORI, Drug screening

165.00

Licensure applications

400.00

Travel to clinical sites

Variable

TOTAL

$9169.60 – 9469.60

 *Please note that tuition may change.   NCLEX-PN LICENSURE EXAMINATION PASS RATES:  The pass rates for Reynolds Practical Nursing graduates on the NCLEX-PN licensure examination for Licensed Practical/Vocational Nurses are provided below for 2010 – 2014: 2014 - 82.76% 2013 - 75% 2012 - 81.58% 2011 - 85.19% 2010 - 76.92% PRACTICAL NURSING PROGRAM OUTCOMES: The Practical Nursing program prepares students to practice in a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic community as demonstrated by the college and community demographic data.  And, upon successful completion of the program, a student will be able to 1.

Use the nursing process to meet common health needs of individuals, families, and the community across the life span in a variety of health care settings and utilize information technology appropriate to the facility; 2. Provide safe nursing care based on application of values and principles from natural, scientific, humanities, and nursing theories that will lead to achievement of an optimum level of wellness; 3. Provide individualized caring interventions to multi-cultural, multi-ethnic clients with multiple bio-psycho-social-spiritual needs; 4. Demonstrate therapeutic communication in the delivery of care to clients across the life span and documentation of client responses through appropriate channels while maintaining confidentiality;

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 5. Assist with nursing care in a collaborative, interdisciplinary environment through planning, coordination, and effective communication; 6. Implement a multifaceted, multisensory approach to the principles of teaching and learning in providing health education to clients across the life span; 7. Utilize the nursing process, critical thinking strategies, and Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs to prioritize nursing care along the health/illness continuum throughout the life span; 8. Integrate critical thinking and evidence-based practice in clinical decision-making for clients in a variety of health care settings; 9. Assume responsibility for lifelong learning and personal development as a professional nurse, member of the health care team, and a contributing citizen within the community; 10. Demonstrate the application of legal and ethical values and principles and regulatory boundaries of the practical nurse; 11. Meet the criteria to take the NCLEX-PN exam; and 12. Meet prospective employer criteria to assume an entry-level position as a practical nurse. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please seewww.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_157.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM:

 Students must be certified in Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers through the American Heart Association prior to the first PNE course. 2

 Students satisfactorily completing PNE 161 and enrolled in PNE 173 will be eligible to take the CNA Exam. 3

 CSC 155 will substitute for ITE 115.

Respiratory Therapy Associate of Applied Science PURPOSE: The degree in Respiratory Therapy is designed to prepare students for roles as contributing members of the modern health care team concerned with treatment, management, and care of patients with breathing, cardiovascular, and sleep abnormalities.  OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Occupational objectives include employment opportunities as respiratory therapy practitioners in hospitals, clinics, research facilities, home care agencies, and alternate care sites. The respiratory therapy practitioner will be able to administer gas therapy, humidity therapy, aerosol therapy, and hyperinflation therapy; assist with mechanical ventilation, special therapeutic and diagnostic procedures, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and airway management techniques; and follow therapeutic protocols. The respiratory therapy practitioner works under the supervision of a physician. 

COURSE

TITLE

BIO 141

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 I

3

4

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission 

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

4

3

5

BIO 142

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 II

3

4

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

PNE 116

Normal Nutrition

1

0

1

Nursing in Health Changes I

4

9

7

11

12

15

Nursing in Health Changes II

6

15

11

PROGRAM NOTES: The Respiratory Therapy program offers courses in both traditional and distance learning formats. All distance learning courses within the curriculum are classified as distance learning with in-person or proctor requirements. This means that most of the instruction for the course is delivered online and that students will be required to make a limited number of trips to a campus site for labs, presentations, and other class activities or to a community site for clinicals or internships. Also, some courses may require proctored testing that can be done at Reynolds’ testing centers, testing sites at other VCCS colleges, or an approved site outside the state of Virginia. 

PNE 173

Pharmacology for Practical Nurses

2

0

2

PSY 230

Developmental Psychology

3

0

3

11

15

16

TOTAL

PNE 161

1,2

TOTAL PNE 162 1,2

TOTAL

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

1

PNE 163

Nursing in Health Changes III

5

9

8

PNE 296

On-Site Training

1

3

2

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

9

12

13

ITE 115

3

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Certificate in Practical Nursing

49

In order to complete the Respiratory Therapy program, students will be required to attend both day and evening classes.  Student Outcomes for the Respiratory Therapy AAS Degree:  Upon completion of the Respiratory Therapy AAS degree, students will be expected to •



Demonstrate competence in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains of respiratory care practice as performed by registered respiratory therapists (RRTs) through the NBRC Self-Assessment Exams and program clinical evaluations; Apply critical thinking to the practice of respiratory care as measured by the NBRC Therapist Multiple-Choice SelfAssessment Exam with a score of 94 or higher;

02.02.16

College Catalog 2016-2017

141

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE •



Synthesize theory and clinical practice as measured by the NBRC Clinical Simulation Self-Assessment Exam with a combined score of 212 or higher on decision making and information gathering; and Demonstrate awareness of credentialing, job placement, interviewing, licensure, and professionalism within the field of respiratory care by completing RTH 227-Integrated Respiratory Therapy Skills II.

MENTORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES: There is a mentorship in association with clinical courses for qualifying students on a space-available basis.  FUNCTIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS: Students entering the Respiratory Therapy program must possess the following functional skills: •

APPLYING TO THE PROGRAM: Applicants must complete the following: •

• •

Fulfill all prerequisites included in the Pre-Respiratory Therapy CSC by the end of the spring semester in the year the student is applying for acceptance into the associate degree Submit a portfolio by February 1 to include a completed Respiratory Therapy program application and official transcript. Meet with the program director or director of clinical education.

ACCEPTANCE INTO THE PROGRAM: Students are accepted into the Respiratory Therapy AAS degree based on completion of the Pre-Respiratory Therapy CSC with a minimum GPA of 2.5 or higher (not to include SDV 100, ITE 115, or Math as part of the GPA calculation) and competitive ranking of their Pre-Respiratory Therapy Career Studies Certificate GPAs. The program director will notify students by the middle of June regarding acceptance.  NON-ACCEPTANCE INTO THE PROGRAM: Students not accepted into the program must reapply by the February 1 deadline. Previously submitted portfolios will not be carried over to the next year’s applicant pool.  ACCEPTANCE INTO CLINICAL COURSES: Students who have been accepted into the program must secure transportation to and from facilities used for clinical experiences. Students enrolled in programmatic clinical rotations shall not receive any form of remuneration in exchange for their work.  In addition, students shall not be substituted for paid staff and/or used simply as back-ups in the absence of appropriate paid staff during clinical rotations.  Students will be placed in clinical courses (RTH 190 or higher) when they have submitted the following (at the student's expense): • • •

142

Completed physical examination form provided by the program, which includes a yearly PPD and flu vaccination, as well as an immunization schedule. Documentation of a current CPR Healthcare Provider Certification (American Heart Association), with biennial recertification. Certified background check and drug screening. (Applicants who do not pass the background check and/ or drug screening will not be allowed to enroll in any Respiratory Therapy clinical course. Without completing the clinical component of the program, students will not be eligible for employment as a student or RCP, or for curriculum completion.   



• •





• •

Sufficient eyesight, including color vision, to observe patients, perform and visualize patient assessments, manipulate equipment, and visually read patient records, graphs, and test results. Sufficient hearing to communicate with patients and members of the health care delivery team, monitor patients using electronic equipment, and hear necessary sounds during operation of equipment. Satisfactory speaking, reading, and writing skills to effectively communicate in English in a timely manner. Sufficient gross and fine motor coordination to exhibit excellent eye-hand coordination and dexterity to manipulate equipment, lift, stoop, and bend in the delivery of safe patient care. Satisfactory physical strength and endurance to be on one’s feet for extended periods and move heavy equipment, patients, and supplies. Sitting, walking, bending, and reaching motions are also requirements for respiratory therapists. Satisfactory intellectual, emotional, and psychological health and functioning to ensure patient safety and to exercise independent judgment and discretion in performing assigned tasks. Time management of multiple priorities, multiple stimuli, and fast-paced environments. Analysis and critical-thinking skills. 

PROGRESSION THROUGH THE PROGRAM: The college offers this program in affiliation with the health care agencies and practitioners in the communities the college serves. The college relies on its community affiliates to provide clinical education opportunities for its students, expert clinical preceptors, and course instructors for many courses. The often rapid changes in health care law, standards of practice, technology, and content of credentialing examinations increasingly necessitate sudden changes in the program’s course content, policies, procedures, and course scheduling. As a result, the college cannot guarantee every student continuous and uninterrupted clinical and course instruction as outlined in the printed catalog curriculum for this program. Circumstances beyond the control of the college may necessitate the postponement of course offerings or changes in the sequencing and/or location of scheduled courses or clinical assignments. Additionally, the college may have to change the instructor for courses after instruction has started.  CONTINUATION IN THE PROGRAM: A student must obtain permission from the program head to continue in the Respiratory Therapy program under the following conditions:  (1) a grade below “C” is earned in any major course; (2) overall GPA falls below a 2.0 average in any one semester.  RE-ENTRY INTO THE PROGRAM: Should a student leave the program for any reason and subsequently wish to be readmitted, a new application must be submitted. The student’s new

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS application will be reviewed under the competitive admissions process. If a student is readmitted into the program, an objective evaluation will be used to determine placement within the curriculum based on evaluated didactic and laboratory competencies. Students who leave the program for more than two semesters will be required to repeat the program in its entirety, including the background check, drug screen, immunization boosters, physical examination, and a two-step TB test or T-Spot blood test.  ADVANCED PLACEMENT STUDENTS: Certified Respiratory Therapists (CRTs) or Registered Respiratory Therapists (RRTs) who are interested in obtaining an Associate of Applied Science degree in Respiratory Therapy must • • • •

Apply at www.reynolds.edu; Be a current CRT or RRT; Hold a Virginia RCP License; and Currently work as a CRT or RRT in a critical care unit.

• • •

• • •

FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS:

Students must also complete a minimum of 18 curriculum credits through the college to meet the residency requirement.  Required Respiratory Therapy Courses: Only offered during the fall semester RTH 223 (2 credits) RTH 226 (2 credits) Only offered during the spring semester RTH 236 (3 credits) *RTH 290 ACC/NPCC III (2 credits) *RTH 290 ACC/NPCC IV (1 credit) Only offered during the summer semester RTH 227 (2 credits) *RTH 290 ACC/NPCC Internship (2 credits) Total = 14 credits

Published hospital policies must be followed. Immunizations must be current. The student releases the facility, its agency, and employees from any liability for any injury or death to self or damage to personal property arising out of the clinical agreement or use of the facility. The student is financially responsible for any medical care required while in the clinical setting. The student must have a current American Heart Association or American Red Cross CPR certification at the BLS level for health care provider. A criminal background check and drug screening are required of all entering students. 

Books and Supplies

$850 first semester; $100 per subsequent semester

Miscellaneous Fees:

 

ACLS DataArc Self-Assessment Exit Exams Seminar

$180 $70 $300 $300

Identification Badge

$15

Uniform/Shoes/Stethoscope

$175

Background Check and Drug Screening

$90

Physical Examination

Varies

Immunizations and Titers

Varies

Note: The above costs are approximate and subject to change.

 

The remaining four (4) credits can include a course(s) in the program (see the curriculum table).

PROGRAM EXIT EXAMS: Every student is required to pass comprehensive exit exams before being added to the National Board for Respiratory Care’s electronic eligibility database. The cost of the exams is added as a course fee.

General education courses completed at another college/ university can be reviewed for transferability by requesting an official transcript to be sent to Central Admissions and Records.

 *2014 CoARC Programmatic Outcomes Data

*Clinical must be completed through the program’s arranged clinical rotation schedule. Clinical cannot be completed during work hours or during any other time while under the auspices of a CRT or RRT.

ATTRITION JOB CRT PLACEMENT SUCCESS

RRT SUCCESS

ON-TIME GRAD RATE

17.4%

63%

100%

83.3%

93.9%

All students must contact the program director by May 1 for course availability.

*The most current CoARC Programmatic Outcomes Data

 

Attrition Threshold:  Less than 40% of the total number of students in the enrollment cohort (three-year average)

CLINICAL CONTRACTS: Individual contracts are in effect with each affiliate clinical agency, and these contracts differ in requirements for students. The general stipulations are as follows: • •

Clinical agencies reserve the right to dismiss a student from their agency at any time with due cause. This will be done with advanced notice except in an emergency. Proper uniform must be worn.

College Catalog 2016-2017

Job Placement Threshold:  Greater than 70% positive placement (three-year average)CRT Success Threshold:  Greater than 80% of total number of graduates obtaining NBRC CRT credential (three-year average)RRT Success:  No threshold requirement

 

2011 Cohort

2012 Cohort

2013 Cohort

143

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Enrolled

Graduation

94 (merging of two programs) 51 (actual enrollment)

47

38

33

49

BIO 141

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 I

TOTAL

2

37

   PROGRAM ACCREDITATION AND PRACTITIONER CERTIFICATION: The Respiratory Therapy program is accredited through the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care, 1248 Harwood Road, Bedford, TX 76021-4244, (817) 283-2835. Graduates of the AAS program are eligible to take the Therapist Multiple-Choice Examination administered by the National Board for Respiratory Care, Inc. Successful completion of the Therapist Multiple-Choice Examination will award graduates the CRT (Certified Respiratory Therapist) credential and the possibility of becoming eligible to take the Clinical Simulation Examination. Successful completion of the Clinical Simulation Examination will award graduates the RRT (Registered Respiratory Therapist) credential. 

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

RTH 102

Integrated Sciences for Respiratory Care

3

0

3

RTH 110

Fundamental Theory and Procedures for Respiratory Care

2

6

4

RTH 121

Cardiopulmonary Science I

3

0

3

Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures I

1

3

2

Pharmacology for Respiratory Care I

1

0

1

College Composition I

3

0

3

College Success Skills

1

0

1

14

9

17

RTH 135

1

RTH 145 2

ENG 111

SDV 100

2

TOTAL RTH 112

Pathology of the Cardiopulmonary System

3

0

3

RTH 131

Respiratory Care Theory and Procedures I

3

3

4

RTH 190

Coordinated Practice in Respiratory Therapy-NCC I

0

10

2

RTH 190

Coordinated Practice in Respiratory Therapy-NCC II

0

10

2

144

9

26

15

Respiratory Care Theory and Procedures II

3

3

4

RTH 222

Cardiopulmonary Science II

3

0

3

RTH 190

Coordinated Practice in Respiratory Therapy-NCC Internship

0

10

2

BIO 142

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 II

3

4

RTH 215

Pulmonary Rehabilitation

1

0

1

10

16

14

TOTAL RTH 265

Current Issues in Respiratory Care

2

0

2

RTH 290

Coordinated Practice in Respiratory Therapy-ACC/NPCC I

0

10

2

RTH 290

Coordinated Practice in Respiratory Therapy-ACC/NPCC II

0

10

2

RTH 223

Cardiopulmonary Science III

2

0

2

RTH 226

Theory of Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care

2

0

2

2,3

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

2,3

Humanities/Fine Arts Electives

3

0

3

12

20

16

______

CURRICULUM: COURSE

4

RTH 132

2

After obtaining the minimum CRT credential, graduates must apply for a license in the state they are seeking employment. State licensure is a process overseen by the Board of Medicine. Graduates are therefore responsible for licensure requirements and fees for that state. It is also the responsibility of graduates to maintain their credentials (CRT or RRT) through the National Board for Respiratory Care, Continuing Competency Program.

3

______ TOTAL

RTH 236

Critical Care Monitoring

2

3

3

RTH 290

Coordinated Practice in Respiratory Therapy-ACC/NPCC III

0

10

2

RTH 290

Coordinated Practice in Respiratory Therapy-ACC/NPCC IV

0

5

1

TOTAL

2

18

6

RTH 227

Integrated Respiratory Therapy Skills II

2

0

2

RTH 290

Coordinated Practice in Respiratory Therapy-ACC/NPCC Internship

0

10

2

2

10

4

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits Required for AAS Degree in Respiratory Therapy

72

02.02.16 1

 RTH 135 fulfills the general education personal wellness requirement.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 2

 This course is included in the Pre-Respiratory Therapy Career Studies Certificate. 3

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

College Catalog 2016-2017

145

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Career Studies Certificates

146

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS  

ACC 215

Computerized Accounting

3

0

3

Accounting

ACC 240

Fraud Examination

3

0

3

Career Studies Certificate

ACC 134

Small Business Taxes (includes Payroll Accounting)

3

0

3

12

0

12

PURPOSE: This program will provide students with the accounting courses needed to meet the requirements of the Virginia Board of Accountancy to sit for the Certified Public Accountancy (CPA) examination.

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Accounting

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: These accounting courses may also meet accounting requirements of various government and private sector positions. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students entering this program must have successfully completed Principles of Accounting I and II (ACC 211-212). Since the CPA exam is computer-based, students should be proficient with computers, including the ability to work with Windows, Word, and Excel. To meet the educational requirements to sit for the Virginia CPA exam, a candidate must obtain the following from one or more accredited institutions: • • •

At least 120 semester hours of college courses; Baccalaureate or higher degree; and Accounting concentration or equivalent.

Course requirements include the following: • •

A minimum of 24 semester hours of accounting courses, to include courses in auditing, financial accounting, management accounting, and taxation; and A minimum of 24 semester hours of business courses.  As many as six hours of accounting courses (not included in the 24 hours of accounting courses) may be considered for the business course requirement.

*Principles of Accounting courses (ACC 211-212) or introductory accounting courses cannot be considered in determining whether a person has obtained the minimum of 48 semester hours or equivalent required for an accounting concentration.

24

01.28.16 1 

Required for the Accounting Career Studies Certificate.  ACC 221 is a prerequisite for ACC 222.

Advanced Medical Coder (Health Information Management) Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program is designed to provide the technical knowledge and skills needed for employment as an advanced medical coder. The coursework for the advanced level will equip students to work in medical records and offer an opportunity for existing coders to further their management, supervisory, auditing, or alternative coding skills. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Advanced medical coders work in hospitals, doctors’ offices, insurance companies, and government agencies. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: To be accepted into the Advanced Medical Coder program, students must have a professional certification from AHIMA (CCA or CCS) or AAPC (CPC) as a certified coder.

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program must meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam.

ACC 221

Intermediate Accounting I

3

0

3

CURRICULUM:

ACC 231

Cost Accounting I

3

0

3

ACC 261

Principles of Federal Taxation I

3

0

3

ACC 241

Auditing I

3

0

3

12

0

12

CURRICULUM:

COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

HIM 229

Performance Improvement in Healthcare Settings

1

2

2

Four of the five courses listed below must be taken to meet the 24-credit requirement.

HIM 295

Topics in HIM: Alternative Coding

5

0

5

COURSE

HIM 220

Health Statistics

3

0

3

Fundamentals of Health Information Systems II

3

0

3

TOTAL

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ACC 222

Intermediate Accounting II

3

0

3

ACC 217

Analyzing Financial Statements

3

0

3

1

College Catalog 2016-2017

HIM 142

1

147

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE HIM 249

Supervision and Management Practices

TOTAL

3

0

3

GE_Info_221-640-01.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.

15

2

16

CURRICULUM:

Total Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Advanced Medical Coder

16

01.28.16

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ASL 100

Orientation to Acquisition of ASL as an Adult

2

0

2

ASL 101

American Sign Language I

3

2

4

ASL 102

American Sign Language II

3

2

4

ASL 115

 Fingerspelling and Number Use in ASL

 2

 0



ASL 125

History and Culture  of the Deaf Community I

3

0

3

ASL 295

Topics in ASL: American Sign Language III

3

0

3

ASL 295

Topics in ASL: American Sign Language IV

3

0

3

1

Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English

 3

 0

 3

2

ASL Elective or INT Elective

2

0

2

24

 4

26

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in American Sign Language

 26



To enroll in HIM 220, students must have a math placement recommendation of MTH 146 and Algebra I or equivalent.

American Sign Language-English Interpretation Career Studies Certificate

1

PURPOSE: This curriculum prepares individuals to communicate in American Sign Language (ASL), primarily with persons who are deaf or hard of hearing. Students also study the U.S. deaf community from a cultural perspective.

ASL 220

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The American Sign Language Career Studies Certificate (CSC) leads to employment opportunities primarily as a classroom aide or teacher assistant in “Deaf and Hard of Hearing” or “Hearing Impaired” K-12 programs. The content learned and skills attained may also form a foundation for further study in numerous careers, including the following: sign language interpretation, teacher of “Deaf and Hard of Hearing” children, American Sign Language instructor, linguistics, and Deaf studies.  Preparation to become a sign language interpreter, as opposed to engaging in direct communication using ASL, is facilitated through completion of the American Sign Language – English Interpretation AAS degree.  Completion of the ASL CSC by May along with placement in ENG 111 satisfies the prerequisites to begin the ASL - English Interpretation AAS in spring/summer annually. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students must take ASL 100, Orientation to Acquisition of ASL as an Adult, during the first semester of study. Students must also begin language study with ASL 101 (ASL I), unless placed into a more appropriate level by the ASL and IE coordinator via the ASL placement test. Students must attain a grade of “C” or better as a final grade in a prerequisite ASL course before enrolling in a more advanced ASL course. The ASL CSC is a five-semester program of part-time study designed to develop intermediate fluency in conversational ASL and a working understanding of Deaf people as a cultural group. Designed to begin in fall with ASL 100 and ASL 101, the first four semesters are each comprised of two courses (6 credits) leading to completion in 21 months during the spring semester when successful students may begin Interpreter Education coursework, while completing the final ASL/INT elective (2 credits). Gainful Employment Disclosure Information: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/

148

ASL ___ or INT ___

2

TOTAL

03.09.15 1

 ASL 295 - American Sign Language III and placement in ENG 111 (or approval of the ASL&IE coordinator) are the prerequisites for ASL 220. 2 

Students may choose from a variety of ASL and INT courses to satisfy the ASL or INT elective.  For details please see the ASL&IE coordinator.

Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This career studies certificate is designed to train individuals for employment in express service light repair and maintenance positions at dealerships and independent repair shops. The curriculum covers both theory and shop training with an emphasis on service and minor repair. As a result of instruction, students will be able to describe the purpose and function of each vehicle system and identify the parts involved and how they work. Additionally, students will learn how to perform basic diagnosis with the end goal of determining if a system is working as designed or if further service is required.  OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Auto Mechanic, Service Advisor, Maintenance Technician, Parts Clerk, and Service Writer 

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission  PROGRAM NOTES: Students are required to meet with the program head either before registering for their first semester or early in their first semester of study. 

Computer-Aided Drafting Applications or Utilizing Surveying Software

2

2

3

DRF 233

Computer-Aided Drafting III

2

2

3

General Education Elective

3

0

3

16

10

21

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Computer-Aided Design Specialist

21

1

___ ___

CURRICULUM:

TOTAL

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

AUT 101

Introduction to Automotive Systems

2

AUT 241

Automotive Electricity I

2

3

3

AUT 111

Automotive Engines I

3

3

4

AUT 265

Automotive Braking Systems

2

3

3

AUT 266

Automotive Alignment, Suspension, and Steering

1

6

3

10

17

16

Total Credits for Career Studies Certificate Automotive Maintenance and Light Repair

16

TOTAL

ARC 211  or  CIV 270

2

3 03.11.15 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. Students may also take ENG 111.

Criminal Justice Career Studies Certificate

Computer-Aided Design Specialist Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: The rapidly evolving field of computer technology has had a dramatic impact on the architectural/engineering professions. The Computer-Aided Design Specialist Career Studies Certificate was created to meet the contemporary graphic needs of architectural and industrial design firms. This program provides the student with thorough training in twoand three-dimensional computer graphics, including studies in visualization and animation. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: CAD Technician, Forensic Computer Technician, Presentation (Rendering) Graphics Specialist, and possibly CAD Manager

PURPOSE: This program provides an overview of criminal justice and basic police officer training. It is designed for those who have an interest in understanding societal issues associated with crime and the work performed by criminal justice professionals. The curriculum examines various approaches to understanding crime. Topics include maintaining law and order, police-citizen conflict, crime prevention, collecting evidence, conducting criminal investigations, the juvenile justice system, and the interface between police and other criminal justice agencies. Issues pertaining to criminal justice and law enforcement in a modern society are addressed. Students completing this career studies certificate may apply the courses completed to the Administration of Justice AAS degree. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The Criminal Justice Career Studies Certificate prepares students for entry-level careers with general law enforcement responsibilities. This career studies certificate may lead to civilian and sworn positions, including dispatchers, police officers, correctional officers, or security personnel.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-729-01.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM:

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Certain illegal activities and/or convictions may prohibit employment in law enforcement. Employing agencies may require additional training, such as completion of a police academy for some positions. Employing agencies may have minimum age requirements for some positions and may require a physical examination.

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

CSC 155

Computer Concepts and Applications

3

0

3

DRF 231

Computer-Aided Drafting I

2

2

3

DRF 232

Computer-Aided Drafting II

2

2

3

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see http://www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful %20Employment/GE_Info_221-400-45.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.

DRF 238

Computer-Aided Modeling and Rendering

2

2

3

CURRICULUM:

College Catalog 2016-2017

149

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

GE_Info_221-117-02.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

CURRICULUM:

ADJ 100

Survey of Criminal Justice

3

0

3

ADJ 105

The Juvenile Justice System

3

0

3

ADJ 228

Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs

3

0

ADJ 128

Patrol Administration and Operations

3

CST 100

Principles of Public Speaking

TOTAL

COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

3

DNL 110

Dental Laboratory Materials

2

3

3

0

3

DNL 140

3

6

5

3

0

3

Dental Anatomy, Physiology, and  Principles of Occlusion

18

0

18

Introduction to Complete Dentures or  Introduction to Removable Partial Dentures or  Introduction to Fixed Prosthodontics or Introduction to Dental Ceramics

6

18

12

Comprehensive Review in Dental 2 Laboratory Technology

0

2

General Education Elective

3

0

3

16

27

25

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Dental Laboratory Technology

25

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Criminal Justice

1

DNL 130   or 

18

1

DNL 135 or 

1

DNL 138   or 

03.12.15

DNL 220

Dental Laboratory Technology

(choose two)

Career Studies Certificate

DNL 240

PURPOSE: This program provides basic job skills training designed for employees of dental laboratories. The program concentrates on current acceptable techniques and their application. Specific studies deal with anatomy and physiology, dental materials, complete dentures, partial dentures, crown and bridge, and ceramics. Individuals involved in the field should consider this program as a means to advance their careers and develop their job skills. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Dental Laboratory Technology Career Studies Certificate (CSC) graduates have employment opportunities in commercial dental laboratories, private dental offices, hospital dental clinics, military base dental laboratories, and dental products manufacturers as technical researchers and technical sales representatives. In addition, dental laboratory technology graduates have the opportunity to own and operate commercial dental laboratory businesses. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to meeting the requirements for general college curricular admission, those interested in entering this program must be engaged in work in a dental laboratory. Courses in the program are offered on campus as well as via distance learning with in-person or proctor required. Students in the distance learning program must attend mandatory laboratory classes offered at the distance learning sites. Tests may be taken at an approved testing center as determined by the faculty member and the program head.

1

2

___ ___ TOTAL

03.12.15 1

 Students in the Dental Laboratory Technology CSC are required to complete two of these dental technology specialty courses (12 credits). Selection requires approval of the program head. 2

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. Students may also take ENG 111.

Early Childhood Education Career Studies Certificate

PROGRAM ACCREDITATION: The Dental Laboratory Technology CSC is not accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. Courses can be transferred into the Dental Laboratory Technology AAS degree (plan code 117), which is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation.

PURPOSE: This program is designed to provide students with the basic skills needed in the care and development of young children in a variety of child care settings. The program provides training appropriate for persons entering the field of early childhood education, as well as in-service training for persons presently working in the field who wish to upgrade their skills. The program also offers a well-organized course of study for parents who wish to increase their understanding of child development.

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION:Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Employment opportunities include preparation or upgrading skills for positions as child

150

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS care center assistant directors, teachers or assistant teachers, aides, playroom attendants, home-based providers or day care workers, camp directors, and before- and after-school teachers in the following types of facilities: child day care centers, nursery schools, family day care homes, Head Start programs, recreational before- and after-school programs, hospital-based child care programs, pre-school at-risk programs, and prekindergarten church-sponsored programs. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to the general college curricular admission requirements, a personal interview with the program head is recommended. Students must attain a grade of “C” or higher in all courses completed in this program with CHD, EDU, and PSY course prefixes. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS.  HRS. HRS. CRE.

CHD 120

Introduction to Early Childhood Education

3

0

3

CHD 145

Teaching Art, Music, and Movement to Children

2

2

3

CHD 205

Guiding the Behavior of Children 3

0

3

EDU 235

Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education

3

0

3

General Education Elective

3

0

3

14

2

15

1

___ __ TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Early Childhood Education

15

also offers a well-organized course of study for parents who wish to increase their understanding of child development. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Employment opportunities include preparation or upgrading skills for positions as child care center assistant directors, teachers or assistant teachers, aides, playroom attendants, home-based providers or day care workers, camp directors, and before- and after-school teachers in the following types of facilities: child day care centers, nursery schools, family day care homes, Head Start programs, recreational before- and after-school programs, hospital-based child care programs, pre-school at-risk programs, and prekindergarten church-sponsored programs. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to the general college curricular admission requirements, those interested in entering the Early Childhood Education – Advanced Career Studies Certificate should hold the Early Childhood Education Career Studies Certificate or be approved by the program head. A personal interview with the program head is recommended. Students must attain a grade of “C” or higher in all courses with CHD and PSY prefixes. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

CHD 118

Language Arts for Young Children

2

2

3

CHD 146

Math, Science, and Social Studies for Children

2

2

3

CHD 210

Introduction to Exceptional Children

3

0

3

PSY 235

Child Psychology

3

0

3

10

4

12

03.12.15

TOTAL

1

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Early Childhood Education – Advanced

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. Students may also take ENG 111.

 

Early Childhood Education – Advanced Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program is designed to provide students with the additional early childhood skills needed in the care and development of young children in a variety of child care settings. The program provides training appropriate for persons presently working in the field who wish to continue to upgrade their knowledge and skills in child development and care. The program

College Catalog 2016-2017

12

03.12.15

Early Childhood School-Age Child Care Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This career studies certificate is designed to train students who want to work with school-age children, ages 6-12, in before- and after-school programs. The curriculum also offers an organized course of study for those who wish to increase their knowledge and understanding of child development. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Employment opportunities for graduates include positions as teachers, teacher aides, and program leaders in settings that provide before- and after-school

151

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE care for school-age children, including day care centers, schools, churches and synagogues, youth organizations, and camps.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-251-01.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.

PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to the general college curricular admission requirements, a personal interview with the program head is recommended. Students must attain a grade of “C” or higher in all courses with CHD, HLT, and PSY course prefixes. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-636-07.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

ITD 110

Web Page Design I

3

0

3

ITD 210

Web Page Design II

4

0

4

MKT 201

Introduction to Marketing

3

0

3

MKT 271

Consumer Behavior

3

0

3

MKT 281

Principles of Internet Marketing

3

0

3

MKT 282

Principles of eCommerce

3

0

3

Social, Ethical, and Legal Issues in eCommerce

3

0

3

28

0

28

CHD 220

Introduction to School-Age Child Care

3

0

3

CHD 225

Curriculum Development for School-Age Child Care

3

0

3

CHD 230

Behavior Management for School-Age Child Care

3

0

3

MKT 283

CHD 235

Health and Recreation for School-Age Child Care

3

0

3

TOTAL

___ ___

Approved General Education Elective

3

0

3

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in eCommerce

HLT 105

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

1

0

1

HLT 106

First Aid and Safety

2

0

2

18

0

18

1

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Early Childhood School-Age Child Care

18

03.12.15 1

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. Students may also take ENG 111 or CST 100.

Ecommerce Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This career studies certificate is designed to meet the needs of employed persons desiring to extend their knowledge of Internet marketing concepts, as well as those seeking training to prepare for employment in the marketing industry and eCommerce. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Advertising Manager, Media Buyer, Salesperson, Internet Retailer, Web Designer, Marketing Manager, Retail Manager, and Marketing Consultant

152

28

03.13.15

Emergency Medical Services Emergency Medical Technician Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program prepares students to become Emergency Medical Technicians at the entry level. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Certified Emergency Medical Technician ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to the general college curricular admission requirements, students must have a current CPR card for either the American Heart Association Healthcare Provider or the American Red Cross Professional Rescuer.  Students without a current CPR card are encouraged to complete HLT 105 (CPR). For students who cannot obtain a CPR card prior to registering for their first EMS course, a CPR class will be offered prior to the first day of class for EMS 111 or EMS 112.  Students desiring to further their emergency medical training and capabilities should consider the Emergency Medical Services - Intermediate Career Studies Certificate or Emergency Medical Services - Paramedic Associate of Applied Science degree after completing this career studies certificate.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS:  In addition to the regular college tuition and fees, the EMS program requires the items listed below. These costs are subject to change.  

CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Emergency Medical Technician – Basic or Emergency Medical Technician – Basic I and Emergency Medical Technician – Basic II

5 3 2

4 2 2

7 4 3

Emergency Medical Technician – Basic Clinical

0

2

1

4

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 I

3

4

4

Textbook and Workbook Fees

$198.00

Background Check and Drug Testing

$81.00

EMS 111 or 

FISDAP Scheduler

$30.00

Uniforms (boots, belt, pants, Reynolds EMS program shirt)

$143.00

EMS 112 and  EMS

Testing Fees:

 

ODEMSA

$50.00

EMS 120

National Registry Paramedic Cognitive Examination

$70.00

BIO 141

Medical Check Up

varies according to student’s doctor fees

BIO 142

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 II

3

4

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

12

12

17

1,3

113

1,2

1,2,3

3

 

Total

To determine current tuition and fees, visit www.reynolds.edu/ pay_for_college/tuition.aspx or call the School of Nursing and Allied Health office at (804) 523-5375.  The instructor will inform students of the textbooks and other required learning materials needed in the syllabus for each course.

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Emergency Medical Services - Emergency Medical Technician

CONTINUATION IN THE PROGRAM:  To continue in the program, students must achieve a course grade of at least "B" (80) in each EMS course. FUNCTIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS: The functional skills listed below apply to students entering the EMS – Emergency Medical Technician CSC, EMS – Intermediate CSC, EMS – Paramedic CSC, and EMS – Paramedic AAS degree. Students entering these programs must have the ability to • • • • • • • •

Verbally communicate in person, via telephone and telecommunications using the English language; Hear spoken information from co-workers, patients, physicians, and dispatchers and sounds common to the emergency scene; Lift, carry, and balance a minimum of 125 pounds equally distributed (250 pounds with assistance), a height of 33 inches, and a distance of 10 feet; Read and comprehend written materials under stressful conditions; Use a prescribed format to document patient information in writing or by entry into a computer program; Demonstrate manual dexterity and fine motor skills, with ability to perform all tasks related to quality patient care in a safe manner; Bend, stoop, crawl, and walk on even surfaces; and Meet minimum vision requirements to operate a motor vehicle within the state.

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see http://www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ ge_info_221-146-01.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.

College Catalog 2016-2017

17

03.11.15 1

 EMS 111 is a one semester certification course. EMS 112 and 113 are taken over two semesters. EMS 111 is equivalent to taking both EMS 112 and EMS 113. 2

 EMS 112 is a prerequisite for EMS 113.

3

 EMS 120 must be taken concurrently with EMS 111 and EMS 113.

4

 BIO 141 is a prerequisite for BIO 142.

Emergency Medical Services Intermediate Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program prepares students to become an entrylevel Intermediate EMS provider at both the national and the state level. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Certified National Registry Intermediate ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Applicants must have completed the Emergency Medical Services EMT Career Studies Certificate or hold a current Commonwealth of Virginia EMT Certification and hold a valid CPR card. Students desiring to further their emergency medical training and capabilities should consider the EMS Paramedic Associate of Applied Science degree after completing this career studies certificate. 

153

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS:  In addition to the regular college tuition and fees, the EMS program requires the items listed below. The costs listed are subject to change. Textbooks and Workbook

$408.00

Background Check and Drug Testing

$81.00

FISDAP Scheduler and Final Exams

$115.00

Uniforms (boots, belt, pants, two Reynolds EMS program shirts)

$178.00

Testing Fees:

 

ODEMSA

$250.00

National Registry Paramedic Cognitive Examination

$110.00

Medical Check Up

varies according to student’s doctor fees

CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

EMS 151

Introduction to Advanced Life Support

3

2

4

EMS 170

ALS Internship I

0

3

1

EMS 153

Basic ECG Recognition

2

0

2

EMS 157

ALS – Trauma Care

2

2

3

EMS 155

ALS – Medical Care

3

2

4

EMS 159

ALS – Special Populations

2

2

3

EMS 172

ALS Clinical  Internship II

0

3

1

EMS 173

ALS Field Internship II

0

3

1

12

17

19

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Emergency Medical Services - Intermediate

19

TOTAL

To determine current tuition and fees, visit www.reynolds.edu/ pay_for_college/tuition.aspx, or call the School of Nursing and Allied Health office at (804)523-5375. The instructor will inform students of the textbooks and other required learning materials needed in the syllabus for each course.

 03.11.15

CONTINUATION IN THE PROGRAM: To continue in the program, students must achieve a grade of at least "B" (80) in each EMS course.

Career Studies Certificate

FUNCTIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS: The functional skills listed below apply to students entering the EMS – Emergency Medical Technician CSC, EMS – Intermediate CSC, EMS – Paramedic CSC, and EMS – Paramedic AAS degree. Students entering these programs must have the ability to • • • • • • • •

Verbally communicate in person, via telephone and telecommunications using the English language; Hear spoken information from co-workers, patients, physicians, and dispatchers and sounds common to the emergency scene; Lift, carry, and balance a minimum of 125 pounds equally distributed (250 pounds with assistance), a height of 33 inches, and a distance of 10 feet; Read and comprehend written materials under stressful conditions; Use a prescribed format to document patient information in writing or by entry into a computer program; Demonstrate manual dexterity and fine motor skills, with ability to perform all tasks related to quality patient care in a safe manner; Bend, stoop, crawl, and walk on even surfaces; and Meet minimum vision requirements to operate a motor vehicle within the state.

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-146-03.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.

154

Emergency Medical Services Paramedic PURPOSE: This program provides a bridge from the Intermediate level to the entry-level paramedic certification and offers registered nurses with experience in critical care an opportunity to meet the requirements to become a paramedic. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: National Registry Paramedic ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Applicants must have completed the Emergency Medical Services Intermediate Career Studies Certificate or hold a current Virginia or NREMT – Intermediate certification and hold a current CPR card. Students desiring to further their emergency medical training and capabilities should consider the EMS Paramedic Associate of Applied Science degree after completing this career studies certificate. FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS: In addition to the regular college tuition and fees, the EMS program requires the items listed below. Costs listed are subject to change. Textbooks, Workbook, and Certification Fees (CPR, ACLS, PHTLS, EPC, and AMLS)

$830.00

Background Check and Drug Testing

$81.00

FISDAP Scheduler and Final Exams

$115.00

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

EMS 205

Advanced Pathophysiology

4

0

4

EMS 207

Advanced Patient Assessment

2

2

3

$250.00

EMS 242

ALS Clinical Internship III

0

3

1

National Registry Paramedic Cognitive Examination

$110.00

EMS 243

ALS Field Internship III

0

3

1

EMS 201

EMS Professional Development

3

0

3

Medical Check Up

varies according to student’s doctor fees

EMS 209

Advanced Pharmacology

3

2

4

EMS 211

Operations

1

2

2

EMS 244

ALS Clinical Internship IV

0

3

1

EMS 245

ALS Field Internship IV

0

3

1

13

18

20

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Emergency Medical Services - Paramedic 

20

Uniforms (boots, belt, pants, two Reynolds EMS program shirts)

$178.00

Testing Fees:

 

ODEMSA

To determine current tuition and fees, visit www.reynolds.edu/ pay_for_college/tuition.aspx, or call the School of Nursing and Allied Health office at (804)523-5375. The instructor will inform students of the textbooks and other required learning materials needed in the syllabus for each course. CONTINUATION IN THE PROGRAM:  Students must achieve a course grade of at least "B" (80) in each EMS course with the exception of EMS 205, which requires a minimum grade of at least "C" (70). FUNCTIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENTS: The functional skills listed below apply to students entering the EMS – Emergency Medical Technician CSC, EMS – Intermediate CSC, EMS – Paramedic CSC, and EMS – Paramedic AAS degree. Students entering these programs must have the ability to • • • • • • • •

Verbally communicate in person, via telephone and telecommunications using the English language; Hear spoken information from co-workers, patients, physicians, and dispatchers and in sounds common to the emergency scene; Lift, carry, and balance a minimum of 125 pounds equally distributed (250 pounds with assistance), a height of 33 inches, and a distance of 10 feet; Read and comprehend written materials under stressful conditions; Use a prescribed format to document patient information in writing or by entry into a computer program; Demonstrate manual dexterity and fine motor skills, with ability to perform all tasks related to quality patient care in a safe manner; Bend, stoop, crawl, and walk on even surfaces; Meet minimum vision requirements to operate a motor vehicle within the state.

RN TO PARAMEDIC BRIDGE PROGRAM:  Registered nurses with two years’ experience in a critical care setting (ICU, CCU, ER) may contact the EMS program head at 804-523-5768 to obtain information regarding completion of the EMS - Paramedic CSC to become a paramedic. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-146-05.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.  CURRICULUM:

College Catalog 2016-2017

TOTAL

03.11.15

Entrepreneurship in Small Business Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program is designed for persons who wish to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to organize and manage a small business. This program addresses management concerns unique to small businesses, including organizational structure, marketing plans, financial analysis, tax requirements, legal issues, and computer applications. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: This program trains students to own, operate, and manage a small business with 100 or fewer employees. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-212-10.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

BUS 100

Introduction to Business

3

0

3

BUS 116

Entrepreneurship

3

0

3

BUS 165

Small Business Management

3

0

3

ACC 117

Essentials of Accounting

3

0

3

AST 205

Business Communications

3

0

3

FIN 215

Financial Management

3

0

3

MKT 215

Sales and Marketing Management

3

0

3

155

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

TOTAL

3

0

3

24

0

24

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Entrepreneurship in Small Business

24

of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. Students may also take ENG 111.

Geospatial Technologies Career Studies Certificate

03.13.15 

Floral Design Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program is intended primarily for students who are seeking employment in the floral design business or who are presently employed in this field and wish to upgrade or enhance their skills. The program is also available for those who wish to establish credentials to demonstrate their expertise for exhibiting and judging. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Careers include serving as an owner/operator of an independent florist business; a floral department manager/staff in a supermarket or garden center; and a floral designer in partnership with a caterer, wedding coordinator, or corporate client. There is also tremendous growth in production, sale, and display of cut flowers at farmers’ markets. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students need good manual dexterity skills to fulfill job requirements in almost all applications of floral design training. In addition, an eye for color and an appreciation for design elements are very helpful.

PURPOSE: This program is designed to prepare students for entry-level positions in technologies using geographic information and positioning systems and provides a strong foundation for continued study in this field. Geographic information and positioning systems use computer technology for collecting, analyzing, and displaying digital geographic data. Fields included in this discipline are spatial analysis, remote sensing, global positioning systems, and cartography (mapmaking). Applications for this area of technology are vast with a wide-ranging career potential for the student in both the public and private sectors. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Geographic Information Systems Technicians, Remote-Sensing Technicians, Geodetic Surveyors, Mapping and Surveying Technicians, and Cartographers ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see reynolds.edu/curriculum/gainful-employment/ ge_info_221-719-71.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS.  HRS. HRS. CRE.

Computer Concepts and Applications

3

0

3

DRF 231

Computer-Aided Drafting I

3

0

3

GIS 200

Geographical Information Systems I

2

2

3

GIS 201

Geographic Information Systems 2 II

2

3

Approved GIS Elective

0-2

4

CSC 155

All courses required for completion of this certificate can be applied to the AAS degree in Horticulture Technology. CURRICULUM:

1

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

HRT 260

Introduction to Floral Design

2

2

3

HRT 266

Advanced Floral Design

2

2

3

GIS __

HRT 268

Advanced Floral Design Applications

2

2

3

TOTAL

Principles of Horticulture

3

0

3

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Geospatial Technologies

Approved General Education Elective

3

0

3

12

6

15

HRT 110 1

___ ___ TOTAL

2

3-4

13-14 4-6 16 16

03.01.16 1

03.13.15

 Students can also meet this requirement by successfully passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for CSC 155. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once.

1

2

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Floral Design

15

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section

156

Students should take one of the following GIS electives: GIS 205, GIS 215, GIS 255, or other GIS elective as approved by the program head.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Health Care Technician (CNA/PCA)



Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: The Health Care Technician Career Studies Certificate is designed to provide entry-level training for nurse aides and occupational progression to advanced nurse aide employment. Coursework includes preparation for employment and career mobility from patient care assistant (PCA), to nurse aide (CNA), and ultimately to advanced nurse aide.  This program prepares students for the Virginia Board of Nursing's occupational exams for nurse aide. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The program includes basic and advanced training for persons seeking to become nurse aides or home health aides working in private homes, residential living facilities, nursing homes, retirement and life care communities, and hospitals. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES:  • •





• • • • • •

To become a patient care assistant (PCA), a student must satisfactorily meet the requirements of the Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS). To become a certified nurse aide (CNA), a student must satisfactorily complete HCT 101 and HCT 102 and pass a national exam that includes both written and practical components.  The CNA Information Pack may be accessed at http://reynolds.edu/curriculum/documents/ Certified_Nursing_Aide_Packet.pdf . To become certified as an advanced nurse aide, the student must have the CNA credential for at least three (3) years, a recommendation from a licensed nursing professional (LPN or RN), evidence of no restrictions on CNA certification by the Virginia Board of Nursing for the last five (5) years; and a recommendation for advanced certification from a licensed nurse who has supervised the applicant in providing direct patient care for at least six (6) months within the past year. The State Board of Nursing has the authority to deny certification to any applicant who has violated any of the provisions of 54.1-3007 of the Code of Virginia. Any student entering the nursing aide course who has committed any illegal offenses other than minor traffic violations should discuss these matters with the program head prior to admission for clarification (see information above). Students must have an the following: American Heart Association CPR BLS for the Healthcare Professional certification; Ability to pass a background check and drug screen (see the Program Information Packet for additional details related to barrier crimes and moral turpitude); and Ability to meet functional health and immunization requirements. Students will be required to repeat any course in which a grade lower than "C" is received. Students will have two (2) attempts to complete a course. Criminal background checks are required of all applicants to the Health Care Technician program.

College Catalog 2016-2017

Inability of a student to be placed in a clinical site due to a negative background check will result in failure in the course.

PROGRESSION THROUGH THE PROGRAM:  Students must have a "C" or better in all courses to progress in the Health Care Technician program.  The college offers this program in affiliation with the health care agencies and practitioners in the communities the college serves. The college relies on its community affiliates to provide clinical education opportunities for its students, expert clinical preceptors, and course instructors for many courses. The often rapid changes in health care law, standards of practice, technology, and content of credentialing examinations increasingly necessitate sudden changes in the program’s course content, policies, procedures, and course scheduling. As a result, the college cannot guarantee every student continuous and uninterrupted clinical and course instruction as outlined in the printed catalog curriculum for this program. Circumstances beyond the control of the college may necessitate the postponement of course offerings or changes in the sequencing and/or location of scheduled courses or clinical assignments.  If a student is dismissed by a clinical facility, alternate placement may require disclosure of information related to the dismissal.  The student must consent to disclosure.  Additionally, the college may have to change the instructor for courses after instruction has started. The Health Care Technician (HCT) CSC includes the following three career pathways: • •



Patient Care Assistant (PCA) -- The PCA can be completed in eight weeks and consists of one course:  NUR 25 (3 credits). Nursing Assistant (CNA) -- The Nursing Assistant pathway can be completed within one semester and consists of the following courses:  HCT 101 and HCT 102.  Both courses must be taken together. Advance Certified Nurse Assistant -- CNAs with three years of full-time CNA experience are eligible for this pathway, which consists of two courses:  NUR 26 and NUR 31.

To receive the Health Care Technician Career Studies Certificate, three (3) additional courses are required:  HLT 105 -Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, BIO 100 -- Basic Human Biology, and HCT 110 -- Therapeutic Communication in the Health Care Setting. PRE-ENTRANCE HEALTH REQUIREMENTS: Applicants must be free of any physical or mental condition that might adversely affect safety and performance as a nurse. Current validation of freedom from tuberculosis is required of all students through skin testing or chest X-ray.  Health care agencies may require vaccination for the flu or use of a mask when providing patient care. PRE-ENTRANCE MATH AND ENGLISH REQUIREMENTS:  Competency in MTE 1 or higher as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by completing MTE 1; competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of ENF 2.

157

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE FUNCTIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENT: Students entering the Health Care Technician program must have the physical ability to 1) aid in the lifting and moving of patients; 2) hear audible alarms and sounds; 3) auscultate certain physical parameters, such as blood pressure and heart and lung sounds; and 4) interact effectively with patients, families, and health care team members. This includes the following: 1.

Sufficient eyesight to observe patients, read records, manipulate equipment, and visually monitor patients in dim light. Sufficient hearing to communicate with patients and members of a health care delivery team, monitor patients using electronic equipment, hear necessary sounds during operation of equipment, and hearing a patient whispering. Satisfactory speaking, reading, and writing skills to effectively communicate in English in a timely manner. Sufficient gross and fine motor coordination to manipulate equipment, lift, stoop, or bend in the delivery of safe nursing care. Satisfactory physical strength and endurance to be on one’s feet for extended periods and to move immobile patients. Satisfactory intellectual and emotional functioning to ensure patient safety and to exercise independent judgment and discretion in performing assigned tasks.

2.

3. 4. 5. 6.

Clinical facilities used by the program may mandate additional requirements for students that include updated immunizations, dress codes, and conformance with professional standards. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see reynolds.edu/curriculum/gainful-employment/ ge_info_221-190-06.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

HLT 105

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

1

0

1

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

2,4

Nursing Assistant (Patient Care Assistant) or

2

4

3

3,4

Health Care Technician I (Nurse Aide I)

3

0

3

 

 

 

1

6

4

1

NUR 25 or

HCT 101 and HCT 3,4

102

and Health Care Technician II (Nurse Aide II)

TOTAL

13-15 13-15 17-219

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Health Care Technician

17

9

02.02.16 1

 Must be American Heart Association BLS level or above.

2

 Students completing HLT 105 (or holding a CPR for the Health Care Provider card) and NUR 25 are eligible to work as a Patient Care Assistant (PCA).  Employment as a PCA means that your employer may receive Medicare Department of Medical Assistance Services (DMAS) reimbursement for your services. 3

 Must be able to pass background check and drug screen; HCT 101 and HCT 102 must be taken concurrently. 4

 NUR 25 is not required to enroll in HCT 101 or HCT 102.

5

 Students enrolling in NUR 26 must have a VBON Certified Nurse Aide Certificate, three (3) years’ experience, and a recommendation from an RN who has supervised them for at least six (6) months. Students who meet these criteria will receive credit-by-able for HCT 101 and HCT 102. 6

 Students enrolled in NUR 26 can take NUR 31 as a co-requisite.

7

 Students enrolled in NUR 26 and NUR 31 must meet with the program head prior to enrollment. 8 

Students enrolled in NUR 31 must have either completed NUR 26 with a “C” or better or be co-enrolled in NUR 26. 9 

Total program credits are variable depending on whether the student completes NUR 25 (3 credits) or HCT 101 and 102 (7 credits).

Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Technology Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This curriculum is designed to meet the need for automotive technicians with education in the advanced technologies used on current vehicles. Such advanced technologies include electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell electric vehicles, as well as the advanced control systems used on these and other advanced vehicles. The program provides instruction on the theory of operation, application, and diagnosis of the systems used in these vehicles.

HCT 110

Therapeutic Communication in the Health Care Setting

3

0

3

BIO 100

Basic Human Biology

3

0

3

NUR

Nursing Assistant (Aide) Advanced

2

3

3

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

Advanced Skills for Nurse Aides

1

6

3

PROGRAM NOTES: To enroll in this program, students must have the following background or the program head’s approval: (1)

26

5,6,7,8

NUR 31

6,7,8

158

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Auto Mechanic, State Safety Inspector, Service Advisor, Maintenance Technician, Parts Clerk, and Service Writer

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS experience in the automotive repair field and (2) completion of AUT 241 – Automotive Electricity I, AUT 242 – Automotive Electricity II, and AUT 245 – Automotive Electronics. Students interested in entering this program are required to meet with the program head before registering for their first semester. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see reynolds.edu/curriculum/gainful-employment/ ge_info_221-909-46.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

AUT 230

Introduction to Alternate Fueled and Hybrid Vehicles

3

0

3

AUT 253

Electric Vehicles

3

3

4

AUT 254

Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles

3

3

4

AUT 243

Automotive Control Electronics

3

3

4

AUT 256

Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles

3

3

4

Humanities/Social Science Elective

3

0

3

18

12

22

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Hybrid and Electric Vehicle Technology

22

1

___ ___ TOTAL

03.13.15 1

 A list of approved electives is available from the program head.

Information Systems Technology Computer Programmer Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: The Computer Programmer Career Studies Certificate is designed to provide knowledge and skills in computer programming and application software development. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Computer Programmer, Applications Programmer, Programmer/Analyst, Internet Programmer, and related computer occupations ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students must attain the grade of “C” or higher in IT courses taken for this certificate. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-299-06.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

College Catalog 2016-2017

HRS. HRS. CRE. ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

ITP 136

C# Programming I

4

0

4

ITP 236

C# Programming II

4

0

4

ITP 251

Systems Analysis and Design

3

0

3

ITD 130

Database Fundamentals

4

0

4

ITP 244

ASP.Net-Server Side Programming

4

0

4

ITP 298

Seminar and Project: Programming Capstone

4

0

4

26

0

26

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Computer Programmer

26

03.13.15

Information Systems Technology Cyber Security Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program provides instruction in Cyber Security and prepares students to recognize and prevent threats to information and information systems, to master techniques for defense against such attacks, and prepares students to sit for the CompTIA Security+ certification exam. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Graduates may seek employment as network security specialists in local businesses, educational institutions, and government agencies. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission ADDITIONAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: The advanced nature of the content requires students to possess a basic understanding of IT networking, PC hardware, operating systems, and application software. This can be demonstrated by completion of the Network Administration CSC or through program head approval. PROGRAM NOTES: This advanced career studies certificate is designed for working professionals with significant networking experience. Students who earn a final grade lower than “C” in any required course must obtain permission from their advisor to continue in this career studies certificate. Additionally, students will be required to repeat any course when grades lower than “C” are earned. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ITN 260

Network Security Basics

4

0

4

LEC.  LAB. CRS.

159

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ITN 261

Network Attacks, Computer Crime, and Hacking

4

0

4

03.13.15

ITN 262

Network Communication, Security, and Authentication

4

0

4

ITN 275

Incident Response and Computer Forensics

3

2

4

Information Systems Technology Microcomputer Applications

15

2

16

 TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Cyber Security

16

03.01.16

Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program is designed to provide microcomputer education and training required by business and industry. Specifically, this includes skills necessary to function in today’s highly technical and computerized environment. Students will use microcomputer application software to develop business applications. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Information Center Microcomputer Specialist, Microcomputer Training Specialist, Microcomputer Sales, and related microcomputer occupations.

Information Systems Technology Internet Application Development (Web Design)

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: The Internet Applications Development (Web Design) Career Studies Certificate provides knowledge and skills for web page design. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Web Page Designer, Webmaster ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

PROGRAM NOTES: Students must attain the grade of "C" or higher in IT courses taken for this certificate. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-299-03.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM:

PROGRAM NOTES: Students must attain the grade of “C” or higher in IT courses taken for this certificate. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-299-18.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM:

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts  

3

0

3

AST 141

Word Processing I

3

0

3

ITE 130

Introduction to Internet Services

3

0

3

ITE 140

Spreadsheet Software

3

0

3

ITE 150

Desktop Database Software

3

0

3

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB.  CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ITE 221

PC Hardware and OS Architecture

4

0

4

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

ITD 110

Web Page Design I

3

0

3

ITE 221

PC Hardware and OS Architecture

4

0

4

ITE 298

Seminar and Project: Microcomputer Applications Capstone

4

0

4

ITD 110

Web Page Design I

3

0

3

TOTAL

26

0

26

ITD 112

Designing Web Page Graphics

3

0

3

ITD 130

Database Fundamentals

4

0

4

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Microcomputer Applications

ITD 212

Interactive Web Design

4

0

4

ITD 210

Web Page Design II

4

0

4

ITD 298

Seminar and Project: Web Design Capstone

4

0

4

29

0

29

TOTAL

0

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Internet Applications Development (Web Design)

160

3

29

26

03.13.15

Information Systems Technology Network Administration

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program provides instruction in beginning networking skills and prepares students to study for the A+ and the Network+ certification exams. The program also prepares students for the Network Engineering Career Studies Certificate. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Hardware Technician, Entry-Level Help Desk Technician, and Entry-Level Technical Support ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students enrolling in this certificate should have a strong foundation in microcomputer applications for word processing, spreadsheet, database, and Windows. Students must attain the grade of “C” or higher in IT courses taken for this certificate.

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Network Administrator, Technical Support Analyst, and Entry-Level Systems Engineer ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students enrolling in this program must have a strong foundation in Computer Concepts, PC Hardware and OS Architecture, and Telecommunications. Students must attain the grade of “C” or higher in IT courses taken for this certificate. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-732-11.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM:

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-732-00.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM:

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ITN 154

Networking Fundamental-Cisco

4

0

4

ITN 155

Introductory Routing-Cisco

4

0

4

ITN 156

Basic Switching and RoutingCisco

4

0

4

WAN Technologies-Cisco

4

0

4

Information Technology Elective

3-4

0

3-4

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ITE 221

PC Hardware  and OS Architecture

4

0

4

ITN 101

Introduction to Network Concepts

4

0

4

ITN 171

UNIX I

3

0

3

ITN 110

Client Operating Systems (Windows 8)

4

0

4

ITN 111

Server Administration (Server 2012)

4

0

4

ITN 260

Network  Security Basics

4

0

4

ITN 254

Virtual Infrastructure: Installation 4 and Configuration

0

4

0

27

Legal Office Technology

27

Career Studies Certificate

TOTAL

27

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Network Administration 09.16.15

Information Systems Technology Network Engineering Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program provides information to enhance the student’s networking skills and prepares the student to study for the Cisco Certified Entry Networking Technician (CCENT) and the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certifications.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ITN 157 1

___ ___ TOTAL

19-200

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Network Engineering

19-20 19

03.13.15 1

 The Information Technology elective can be selected from one of the following areas: Information Technology Design (ITD),  Information Technology Essentials (ITE), Information Technology Networking (ITN), or Information Technology Programming (ITP).

PURPOSE: The Legal Office Technology Career Studies Certificate is designed to prepare students for employment in the legal office and in other offices where legal services are required. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Legal Secretary, Calendar Clerk, Document Processor, Records Clerk, Administrative Assistant, and Court Clerk ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students will be required to repeat English and major courses in which grades lower than “C” are received. Major courses are those with prefixes of LGL or AST.

161

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-260-10.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

LGL 110

Introduction to Law  and the Legal Assistant

3

0

3

LGL 125 or  LGL 210

Legal Research or  Virginia and Federal Procedure

3

0

3

BUS 240

Introduction to  Business Law

3

0

3

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

AST 243

Office Administration I

3

0

3

AST 205

Business Communications

3

0

3

21

0

21

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Legal Office Technology

21

03.13.15

Medical Records Coder (Health Information Management) Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program is designed to provide the technical knowledge and skills, along with the practical experience, needed for employment as a basic medical records coder. Assisted by specialized computer equipment and software, medical records coders analyze and interpret the patient’s record to determine the proper standardized codes that represent the patient’s diagnosis and treatment. These codes may be used to create accurate standardized records, to maintain health statistics, or for billing purposes. The need for medical records coders will continue to increase as the health field continues to address reimbursement challenges and move toward a focus on quality improvement related to health care services. Upon satisfactory completion of the program, students will be eligible to take national accrediting exams offered by the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC). OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Medical records coders work in hospitals, doctors’ offices, insurance companies, and government agencies. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

162

PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to the general college curricular admission requirements, a personal interview with the program head is required for advising prior to enrollment in the first HIM course. Courses need to be taken in the sequence listed. Students will be required to repeat any course in which a grade lower than “C” is received. This program must be completed within two years. This program is not accredited; however, upon completion of this program, students will be prepared to take the national certification exams for coding. Students with significant on-thejob training may be eligible for advanced placement or may receive program head permission to enroll in select courses only. STUDENT OUTCOMES FOR MEDICAL RECORDS CODER CAREER STUDIES CERTIFICATE:  Students who complete the Medical Records Coder Career Studies Certificate will be expected to • •

• •

Recognize and implement professional policies and procedures related to the legal and ethical use of medical information; Interpret health record documentation using knowledge of anatomy, physiology, clinical indicators and disease processes, pharmacology, and medical terminology to identify codeable diagnoses and/or procedures, according to the ICD-10-CM and CPT-4 coding systems; Apply knowledge of major reimbursement systems in the United States to the preparation of universal billing claims; and Demonstrate behaviors and dispositions that are in accord with professional ethics, including integrity, respect for privacy, and commitment to professional growth.

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program must meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which they will receive college credit for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam. Either ITE 115, CSC 155, or the competency test must be completed in the first semester or students may not progress to the second semester. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see http://www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful %20Employment/GE_Info_221-152-06.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

BIO 100

Basic Human Biology

3

0

3

HLT 143

Medical Terminology I

3

0

3

HIM 141

Fundamentals of Health Information Systems I

3

0

3

ITE 115

1

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS HIM 110

FINANCIAL REQUIREMENTS: In addition to the regular college tuition and fees, the following expenses may be required for the Opticians Apprentice program: 

Introduction to Human Pathology

3

0

3

2

Health Classifications Systems I: ICD-9/10-CM

4

0

4

Health Data Classification Systems II: CPT

2

0

2

USB headset (for all distance courses)

$25-75

2

Reimbursement Issues in Medical Practice Management

2

0

2

Testing center fees (for distance clinical courses only)

$ varies by location

HIM 151 HIM 256

Clinical Classification Systems and Reimbursement Methodologies

2

6

5

26

6

29

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-160-04.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.

Total Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Medical Records Coder

29

CURRICULUM:

HIM 250 HIM 255

TOTAL

COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB.  CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

OPT 150

Optical Laboratory Theory I

3

0

3

OPT 151

Optical Laboratory Theory II

3

0

3

OPT 121

Optical Theory I

3

0

3

OPT 122

Optical Theory II

3

0

3

OPT 105

Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology of the Eye

3

0

3

PURPOSE: Successful completion of the Opticians Apprentice Career Studies Certificate will prepare students for employment in the eye care field throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. This program is offered solely to provide the required related instruction component of the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry (DOLI) Opticians Apprentice program.

OPT 160

Optical Dispensing Theory I

3

0

3

18

0

18

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Students who successfully complete this career studies certificate and complete the 6,000 hours of on-the-job training as a Virginia DOLI registered apprentice will be eligible to sit for the licensure examination to become an optician in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

    03.11.15

02.01.16 1

 CSC 155 can be substituted for ITE 115.

2

 These courses require some on-campus meetings.

Opticians Apprentice Career Studies Certificate

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to the general college curricular admission requirements, an interview with the Opticianry program head is required before beginning the curriculum. Students must provide proof that they are registered as an Apprentice Optician with the Virginia Department of Labor and Industry. This career studies certificate may be completed in one to three years. Apprentice students are required to complete 2,000 hours of on-the-job training per year, for a total of 6,000 hours, along with the required courses in this career studies certificate. Students will be required to repeat any OPT course in which a grade lower than “71” is received. The courses in this certificate are offered via distance learning online with weekly virtual meetings.  Computer literacy is required to be successful.  If a student is not prepared to take an online class, we highly recommend taking ITE 115 (or equivalent course) prior to enrolling in this program.  

College Catalog 2016-2017

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Opticians Apprentice

18

Pastry Arts Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: The Pastry Arts program is intended to develop knowledge and skills in modern and classical pastry and baking techniques and products. The curriculum provides technical education in baking, pastry production, confections, and artistic product presentation and leads to employment in a variety of culinary and retail career paths. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: The Pastry Arts Career Studies Certificate prepares graduates to enter the following positions: Baker, Pastry Sous Chef, and Pastry Chef. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: The Pastry Arts Career Studies Certificate requires that students have the following competencies: (1) competency in Math Essentials MTE 1-3 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent, and (2) competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of a college-level composition course.

163

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Students needing to complete developmental studies courses in English or mathematics may take those courses concurrently with HRI courses, if approved by the program head. Faculty provide advising to enhance student success. All students wishing to enroll in Pastry Arts must attend an advising session. Once enrolled, students must meet with their advisor every semester to review their scheduling strategy and status toward graduation. Information about advising and enrolling in classes is available at the following link: http://www.reynolds.edu/ get_started/programs/business/culinary_and_hospitality/ admission.aspx. Students who earn a final grade lower than “C” in any HRI course must obtain permission from their advisor to continue the major in Pastry Arts. Students will normally be required to repeat courses in their major when grades lower than “C” are earned. Exceptions must be approved in writing by the program head. The recommended 2-semester sequence can be viewed at  http://www.reynolds.edu/get_started/programs/business/ culinary_and_hospitality/pastryartssequence.aspx. The competency-based nature of the curriculum allows students with previous educational studies or training experience to be evaluated for advanced standing. Students who believe they are eligible for such consideration are required to meet with their advisor to discuss eligibility for evaluation and possible advanced standing. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-242-04.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM:

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Pastry Arts

26

07.02.15 1

 Students must take HRI 115 during their first semester.

2

 Students enrolled in HRI classes will be permitted into those classes only when wearing approved uniforms. Specifications may be obtained at http://www.reynolds.edu/get_started/

programs/business/culinary_and_hospitality/ uniformsnew.aspx or from program faculty.

Pharmacy Technician Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: The Pharmacy Technician program is designed to prepare students to assist and support licensed pharmacists in providing health care and medications to patients. Students will obtain a broad knowledge of pharmacy practice and be skilled in the techniques required to order, stock, package, prepare, and dispense medications under the supervision of a licensed pharmacist. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Pharmacy technicians work in the following types of pharmacies: hospitals, retail, home health care, nursing homes, clinics, nuclear medicine, and mail order. Pharmacy technicians can be employed with medical insurance companies, pharmacy software companies, drug manufacturing and wholesale companies, food processing companies, and as instructors in pharmacy technician training programs. Currently, hospital, home health care, and retail pharmacies hire the majority of technicians.

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 101

Orientation to Culinary and Pastry Arts

2

0

2

HRI 128

Principles of Baking

2

3

3

HRI 115

Food Service Managers Sanitation Certification

1

0

1

HRI 226

Leadership and Kitchen Management

2

0

2

FIRST SEMESTER TOTAL

7

3

8

HRI 106

Principles of Culinary Arts I

2

3

3

Health-Conscious Baking

2

3

3

Specialty, Spa, and Plated Desserts

2

3

3

6

9

9

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-190-08.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.

Wedding and Specialty Cakes

2

3

3

CURRICULUM:

2

Artisan Breads

2

3

3

2

Chocolate and Sugar Arts

2

3

3

6

9

9

HRI 288 2

HRI 284

SECOND SEMESTER TOTAL 2

HRI 286 HRI 281

HRI 285

THIRD SEMESTER TOTAL

164

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students must complete the English and mathematics placement testing and any required developmental courses based on the placement test results. Students must place at MTE 4 or take MTH 126 for entry into the Pharmacy Technician program. Students choosing to enroll in HLT 290 must have transportation and must be able to complete the 160-hour internship of HLT 290. Students may have to complete hours during the day, evening, or weekend, depending on the internship site. Students must pass HLT 143, HLT 250, and HLT 261 with a “C” or better to advance to HLT 262, HLT 290, or HLT 298.

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

HLT 143

Medical Terminology I

3

0

3

HLT 250

General Pharmacology

3

0

3

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Basic Pharmacy I

3

0

3

HLT 262

Basic Pharmacy II

3

0

3

HLT 298    or  HLT 290

Seminar and Project in Health (Pharmacy Technician) or Coordinated Internship

4 1

0 15

4 4

HLT 261

1

TOTAL

13-16 0-15 16

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Pharmacy Technician

16

03.16.15 1

 AST 101 should be taken if student does not have a keyboarding speed of at least 25 wpm. AST 101 may be taken prior to or concurrently with HLT 261.

Pre-Dental Assisting

at the beginning of a fall semester must have all developmental and prerequisite courses completed by the end of the previous spring semester. Students wishing to enter in the beginning of a spring semester must have all requirements completed by the end of the previous summer semester. After completing all developmental and prerequisite courses, students will need to interview with the program head to be eligible to enter the Dental Assisting Certificate. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Those students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM:

Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: The Pre-Dental Assisting Career Studies Certificate (CSC) is designed to help prepare students for admission to the Dental Assisting Certificate. Students enrolled in this CSC are not yet accepted into the Dental Assisting Certificate, but are completing their developmental (if required) and general education courses.

Students must report to Enrollment Services following placement testing for interpretation of scores and assistance with developing a course schedule to complete the Pre-Dental Assisting CSC. All developmental courses must be completed with a passing grade of “S” and prerequisite courses with a “C” or better. Students wishing to enter the Dental Assisting Certificate

College Catalog 2016-2017

LEC. LAB.  CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

HLT 105

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

1

0

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

Principles of Psychology

3

0

3

11

0

11

1

PSY 200 TOTAL

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

PROGRAM NOTES: This CSC accepts new students in the spring, summer, and fall semesters of each year. Students must declare their plan as Pre-Dental Assisting Career Studies Certificate (plan code 221-120-01) and will be assigned the Dental Assisting Certificate (plan code 120). Enrollment in the Dental Assisting Certificate is limited, so contact with the program head is imperative. Completion of this CSC does not guarantee admission to the Dental Assisting Certificate.

TITLE

ITE 115

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: This CSC is designed to prepare students to succeed in the Dental Assisting Certificate.

ADDITIONAL ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: Students applying to this program must also complete Reynolds placement tests and submit an official high school transcript, GED, or certificate of completion of home schooling and college transcripts (if applicable) to Central Admissions and Records. The transcript must document completion of high school biology and one unit of high school math with a grade of “C” or better, or completion of Reynolds equivalent BIO 1 and MTE 2 with a grade of “S,” or completion of comparable college-level courses with a “C” or better. Students must complete all Reynolds developmental coursework prescribed as a result of placement tests.

COURSE

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Pre-Dental Assisting

11

03.16.15 1

 CSC 155 can be substituted for ITE 115.

Pre-Medical Laboratory Technology Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: The Pre-Medical Laboratory Technology Career Studies Certificate (CSC) is designed to help prepare students for admission to the Medical Laboratory Technology AAS degree. Students enrolled in this CSC are not yet accepted into the Medical Laboratory Technology degree, but are completing their general education and prerequisite courses. After completing this CSC, students will need to apply for admission to the Medical Laboratory Technology AAS degree. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: This program is designed to prepare students to succeed in the Medical Laboratory Technology AAS degree. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

165

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE PROGRAM NOTES: This program takes new students in the spring, summer, and fall semesters of each year. Students must declare their plan as Pre-Medical Laboratory Technology CSC (code 221-151-01) and will be assigned the Medical Laboratory Technology AAS plan (code 151). Students enrolled in this CSC are encouraged to meet with their program advisor during the first semester of courses. Completion of this CSC does not guarantee admission into the Medical Laboratory Technology degree.

4

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once.

PURPOSE: The Pre-Nursing Career Studies Certificate (CSC) is designed to help prepare students for admission to the Nursing AAS degree.

CURRICULUM:

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: This program is designed to help prepare students to succeed in Nursing AAS degree options.

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB.  CRS.  HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

___ ___

Personal Wellness Elective

0-2

0-4 2

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

ENG 112

College Composition II

3

0

3

ITE 115

1

2

BIO 101

General Biology I

3

3

4

3

General Chemistry or College Chemistry I

3

3

4

4

Mathematics for Allied Health or  Pre-Calculus

3

0

3

2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

2

Social/Behavioral Science Electives

3

0

3

CHM 101 or  CHM 111

MTH 126 or  MTH 163 ___ ___ ___ ___ TOTAL

25-276-10 29

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Pre-Medical Laboratory Technology

29

02.04.16

 MTH 120 meets the graduation requirement for the AAS degree in Medical Laboratory Technology. Students planning to pursue a four-year degree should take MTH 163.

Pre-Nursing Career Studies Certificate

Students enrolled in this CSC are not yet accepted into Nursing AAS degree options, but are completing general education and prerequisite courses. Students in this CSC should review the Nursing AAS degree options to determine the best time to apply.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: A student may begin this CSC at any time. Students must declare their plan as Pre-Nursing CSC (code 221-156-02). Students receiving financial aid will also be assigned the AAS in Nursing (code 156). The Nursing program is competitive, and completion of the Pre-Nursing CSC does not guarantee placement in the Nursing AAS degree. Students enrolled in this CSC are encouraged to meet with their program advisor as they begin this program of study. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Those students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

ITE 115

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

2

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

3

Mathematics for Allied Health

3

0

3

BIO 141

4

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 I

3

4

BIO 142

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 II

3

4

PSY 230

Developmental Psychology

3

0

3

SOC 200

Principles of Sociology

3

0

3

1

___ ___

2

MTH 126

 CSC 155 will substitute for ITE 115.

 A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design. 3

 CHM 101 meets the graduation requirement for the AAS degree in Medical Laboratory Technology. Students planning to pursue a four-year degree should take CHM 111.

166

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS TOTAL

25

6

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Pre-Nursing

27 27

for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Those students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM:

01.27.16 1

CSC 155 can be substituted for ITE 115.

COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

HLT 105

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

1

0

1

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

BIO 141

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 I

3

4

BIO 142

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 II

3

4

PSY 230

Developmental Psychology

3

0

3

17

6

19

2

A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

ITE 115

 3

Students are encouraged to pursue a higher-level mathematics course to meet this requirement that will also meet the mathematics requirement for a BSN degree. MTH 146, MTH 163, MTH 166, or MTH 240 can be substituted for MTH 126. MTH 146 or MTH 240 are the more commonly required math courses for a BSN degree.  Math placement levels and prerequisites must be satisfied for enrollment in higher-level math courses.

TOTAL

4

Prerequisites for BIO 141 for Pre-Nursing CSC students can be met by one of the following: high school biology and chemistry within the past seven (7) years, or achievement of a score of 45% or higher on the science section of the TEAS Test, or completing BIO 101 with a grade of C or above.

1

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Pre-Practical Nursing

19

03.16.15 1

Pre-Practical Nursing

 CSC 155 will substitute for ITE 115.

Career Studies Certificate

Pre-Respiratory Therapy

PURPOSE: The Pre-Practical Nursing Career Studies Certificate (CSC) is designed to help prepare students for admission to the Practical Nursing Certificate. Students enrolled in this CSC are not yet accepted into the Practical Nursing Certificate, but are completing their general education and prerequisite courses. After completing the CSC, students will apply for admission to the Practical Nursing Certificate.

Career Studies Certificate

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: This program is designed to prepare students to succeed in the Practical Nursing Certificate. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: Students interested in the Practical Nursing program should review the information on the program in the College Catalog. Students must declare their plan as the PrePractical Nursing Career Studies Certificate (code 221-157-02) and will subsequently be assigned the Practical Nursing Certificate (code 157). Admission to the Practical Nursing Certificate is competitive, and completion of the Pre-Practical Nursing CSC does not guarantee placement in the program. COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit

College Catalog 2016-2017

PURPOSE: The Pre-Respiratory Therapy Career Studies Certificate (CSC) is designed to help prepare students for admission to the Respiratory Therapy AAS degree. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: This program is designed to prepare students to succeed in the Respiratory Therapy AAS degree. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: This program admits new students in the spring, summer, and fall semesters of each year. Students must declare their plan as Pre-Respiratory Therapy CSC (code 221-181-02) and will be assigned the Respiratory Therapy AAS plan (code 181). Declaring the Respiratory Therapy AAS plan code does not mean that the student has been accepted to the program. Students enrolled in this CSC must communicate with their Respiratory Therapy program advisor after completing at least 15 credits of the curriculum. All CSC courses must be in progress or completed by the February 1 application deadline for the fall Respiratory Therapy AAS degree program. Completion of this CSC does not guarantee admission to the Respiratory Therapy AAS degree.

167

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE Students enrolled in the Pre-Respiratory Therapy Career Studies Certificate must do the following:  •



• •

Take the Mathematics Virginia Placement Test (VPT) and complete through MTE 5 if developmental mathematics is required based on placement test results. Students with transferable college algebra with a grade of “C” or better will be exempt from the mathematics placement test. Achieve a grade of “C” or better in BIO 141 and BIO 142. The prerequisites for BIO 141 are high school biology and chemistry completed within five years of registering for the course or BIO 101 (or an equivalent) or advisor approval. Attain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 in ENG 111, Social/Behavioral Science Elective, Humanities/ Fine Arts Elective, BIO 141, BIO 142, RTH 102, and RTH 121. Apply to graduate from the Pre-Respiratory Therapy Career Studies Certificate. (Refer to the Academic Calendar for graduation deadlines.)

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program will meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam, administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which case they will receive college credit for ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC.  LAB.  CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

ITE 115

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts

3

0

3

ENG 111

College Composition I

3

0

3

RTH 102

Integrated Sciences for Respiratory Care

3

0

3

RTH 121

Cardiopulmonary Science I

3

0

BIO 141

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 I

BIO 142

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Real Estate Salespersons, Real Estate Broker, Real Estate Office Manager, Real Estate Sales Manager ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: The Real Estate Agent/Broker Career Studies Certificate satisfies the Virginia Real Estate Commission’s Educational Requirements for Salespersons. For specific information regarding Virginia Real Estate licensing of agents and brokers, students should contact the Virginia Department of Professional and Occupational Regulations (DPOR) at dpor.virginia.gov. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION:  Please see www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful%20Employment/ GE_Info_221-212-70.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: LEC. LAB. CRS.  HRS. HRS. CRE.

REA 100

Principles of Real Estate

4

0

4

REA 110

Real Estate Sales

3

0

3

REA 215

Real Estate Brokerage

3

0

3

REA 216

Real Estate Appraisal

4

0

4

3

REA 217

Real Estate Finance

3

0

3

3

4

REA 245

Real Estate Law

3

0

3

20

0

20

Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 II

3

4

1

Social/Behavioral Science Elective

3

0

3

1

Humanities/Fine Arts Elective

3

0

3

25

6

27

TOTAL

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Pre-Respiratory Therapy

27

03.11.15  A list of approved general education electives (humanities/ fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, mathematics, science, and personal wellness) is provided in the General Education section of the catalog under Curriculum Planning and Design.

168

PURPOSE: The curriculum is designed for persons who seek full-time employment in the real estate field, for those presently in the field who are seeking promotions, for those seeking to improve or acquire knowledge and understanding of essential real estate subjects, and for those seeking recertification.

TITLE

___ ___

1

Career Studies Certificate

COURSE

___ ___

TOTAL

Real Estate Agent/Broker

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Real Estate Agent/Broker

20

03.16.15

Release of Health Information Specialist (Health Information Management) Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: This program is designed to provide the technical knowledge and skills needed for employment as a release of health information specialist. Release of health information specialists assemble, process, and maintain medical records

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS of hospital and clinic patients in a manner consistent with administrative, legal, ethical, and regulatory requirements of the health care system. Duties could include retrieving patient medical records, protecting the security of medical records to ensure that confidentiality is maintained, and releasing information to persons or agencies according to regulations. 

HLT 143

Medical Terminology I

3

0

3

HIM 141

Fundamentals of Health Information Systems I

3

0

3

HIM 130

Healthcare Information Systems

3

0

3

HIM 226

2

0

2

OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Release of health information specialists work in hospitals, doctors’ offices, insurance companies, and government agencies. 

Legal Aspects of Health Record Documentation

HIM 195

1

0

1

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission 

Topics in Health Information Management: Chart Retrieval Services

TOTAL

17

0

17

COMPUTER COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT: Students in this program must meet the college’s computer competency requirement by successfully completing ITE 115 or CSC 155. Students can also meet this requirement by passing the college’s computer competency exam administered in the testing centers on each campus, in which they will receive college credit for ITE 115. Students not passing the computer competency exam may retake the exam only once. Either ITE 115 or the competency test must be completed in the first semester or students may not progress to the second semester. PROGRAM NOTES: Student outcomes for the Release of Health Information Specialist Career Studies Certificate: Students who complete the career studies certificate will be expected to • • • •

Recognize and implement professional policies and procedures related to the legal and ethical use of medical information; Interpret health record documentation using knowledge of anatomy, physiology, clinical indicators and disease processes, pharmacology, and medical terminology; Apply knowledge of major reimbursement systems in the United States to the preparation of universal billing claims; and Demonstrate behaviors and dispositions that are in accord with professional ethics and behavior, including integrity, respect for privacy, and commitment to professional growth.

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION:  Please see reynolds.edu/curriculum/gainful-employment/ ge_info_221-152-02.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

SDV 100

College Success Skills

1

0

1

HLT 195

Topics in Health: Ethics for Health Care Personnel

1

0

1

ITE 115 or  CSC 155

Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts or Computer Concepts and Applications

3

0

3

Total Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Release of Health Information Specialist  02.02.16

Substance Abuse Counseling Education Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: The Human Services program offers a career studies certificate in Substance Abuse Counseling Education designed to prepare students with the requisite professional knowledge, intervention skills, and values for delivering services in substance abuse counseling programs and addictions treatment. Courses in this curriculum can be used to meet the certification requirements of substance abuse counselors and substance abuse counseling assistants designated by the Health Professions Board of Counseling in the Commonwealth of Virginia. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Graduates may be employed in a variety of settings, including, but not limited to, hospital and residential-based treatment programs, community-based treatment programs, group homes, homeless shelters, residential halfway houses, and institutional and community-based juvenile and adult corrections. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission PROGRAM NOTES: In addition to the general college curricular admission requirements, an interview with the Human Services program head is recommended. While a face-to-face interview is preferable, an interview can also be conducted via telephone or electronic conference. Students should see their program advisor for information on the certification requirements of the Virginia Health Professions Board of Counseling for credentialing certified substance abuse counselors and certified substance abuse counselor assistants. GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION:  Please see http://www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/gainful-employment/ ge_info_221-480-30.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program. CURRICULUM: COURSE

College Catalog 2016-2017

17

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS.

169

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE HRS. HRS. CRE.

HRT 130

Introduction to Biointensive Mini-Farming

3

0

3

HRT 134

Four Season  Food Production

3

0

3

3

HRT 238

Growing for Market  Mini-Farming

2

2

3

0

3

HRT 239

0

3

0

3

Complete Diet Mini-Farming

3

3

Treatment Systems

3

0

3

HRT 190

Coordinated Internship

0

5

1

Case Management and Substance Abuse

3

0

3

TOTAL

14

7

16

HMS 266

Counseling Psychology

3

0

3

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Sustainable Agriculture

HMS 290

Coordinated Internship in Human Services

0

15

3

21

15

24

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Substance Abuse Counseling Education

24

ENG 111  or  CST 100

College Composition I or Principles of Public Speaking

3

HLT 121

Introduction to Drug Use and Abuse

3

0

HMS 260

Substance Abuse Counseling

3

HMS 220

Addiction and Prevention

HMS 270 HMS 258

TOTAL

0

3

16

03.16.15

03.16.15

1

 Students who have already completed HRT 290, Coordinated Internship, a requirement for the AAS degree in Horticulture Technology, will be able to substitute that course for HRT 190.

Welding Career Studies Certificate

Sustainable Agriculture Career Studies Certificate PURPOSE: With the rapid growth in planning, production, and marketing of organically produced foods, there is an increasing need for qualified personnel trained in sustainable agriculture and organic food production methods. The Career Studies Certificate in Sustainable Agriculture is designed for persons interested in producing food crops for personal consumption or for sale to the public through farmers’ markets and other direct-to-consumer marketing strategies. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Owner/operator of a food crop production business, including the production of food crops for specialty markets, e.g., restaurants, farmer’s markets, herb producers, and pick-your-own operations; managing entry-level workers at other food production businesses; growing products to create secondary products (value added); and planning and growing food crops to be used for personal consumption ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission

CURRICULUM: COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

HRT 110

Principles of Horticulture

3

0

PURPOSE: Employment opportunities exist for individuals proficient in advanced welding techniques. This program is designed for students with no previous experience in welding, as well as for individuals currently employed in the welding field who wish to upgrade their skills. Individuals entering the Welding Career Studies Certificate (CSC) should consider this program as a means of developing or advancing their job skills over a one-year period of time and as a means of acquiring the skills necessary to test for the various levels of welding certification. OCCUPATIONAL OBJECTIVES: Opportunities for graduates include construction welder, fabrication welder, and welding supply salesperson. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: General college curricular admission GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see http://www.reynolds.edu/curriculum/Gainful %20Employment/GE_Info_221-995-01.aspx to access to access gainful employment information for this program. CURRICULUM:

GAINFUL EMPLOYMENT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION: Please see reynolds.edu/curriculum/gainful-employment/ ge_info_221-335-06.aspx to access gainful employment disclosure information for this program.

170

1

3

COURSE

TITLE

LEC. LAB. CRS. HRS. HRS. CRE.

WEL 120

Fundamentals of Welding

1

3

2

WEL 124

Shielded Metal Arc Welding Advanced

2

3

3

WEL 141

Welder Qualification Tests I

2

3

3

WEL 150

Welding Drawing and Interpretation

2

0

2

College Catalog 2016-2017

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS WEL 160

Gas Metal Arc Welding (MIG and FCAW)

2

3

3

WEL 195

Topics in Welding: Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (TIG)

2

3

3

WEL 195

Topics in Welding: Layout and Fitting for Welders

2

3

3

13

18

19

Total Minimum Credits for Career Studies Certificate in Welding

19

TOTAL

02.24.16

College Catalog 2016-2017

171

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE

172

College Catalog 2016-2017

EXPLANATORY NOTES

EXPLANATORY NOTES Explanatory Notes

College Catalog 2016-2017

174

173

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE  

Explanatory Notes COURSE NUMBERS NUMBERS 1-9 INDICATE DEVELOPMENTAL STUDIES COURSES.  Credits earned in these courses are not applicable toward certificate or associate degree programs. NUMBERS 10-99 INDICATE BASIC OCCUPATIONAL COURSES (EXCEPT FOR ESL COURSES). Credits earned for these courses are applicable toward certificate programs. These credits are not applicable toward an associate degree. NUMBERS 100-199 INDICATE FRESHMAN-LEVEL COURSES.  Credits earned for these courses are applicable toward associate degree and certificate programs. NUMBERS 200-299 INDICATE SOPHOMORE-LEVEL COURSES.  Credits earned for these courses are applicable toward associate degree and certificate programs. COURSE CREDITS The credit for each course is indicated after the title in the course description. One credit is equivalent to one collegiate semesterhour credit. COURSE HOURS The number of lecture hours in class each week (including lecture, seminar, and discussion hours) and/or the number of laboratory hours in each week (including laboratory, shop, supervised practice, and cooperative work experiences) are indicated for each course in the course description. In addition to the lecture and laboratory hours in class each week, students must spend time on out-of-class assignments under their own direction.

Covers new content not covered in existing courses in the discipline. Allows instructor to explore content and instructional methods to assess the course’s viability as a permanent offering. Variable hours. 95-195-295 TOPICS IN Provides an opportunity to explore topical areas of interest to or needed by students. May be used also for special honors courses. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours. 96-196-296 ON-SITE TRAINING  Specializes in career orientation and training program without pay in selected businesses and industry, supervised and coordinated by the college. Credit/work ratio not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours. 97-197-297 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION  Provides on-the-job training for pay in approved businesses, industrial, and service firms. Is applicable to all occupational/ technical curricula at the discretion of the college. Credit/work ratio not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours. 98-198-298 SEMINAR AND PROJECT  Requires completion of a project or research report related to the student’s occupational objective and a study of approaches to the selection and pursuit of career opportunities in the field. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours. 99-199-299 SUPERVISED STUDY  Assigns problems for independent study incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours.

PREREQUISITES AND CO-REQUISITES If any prerequisites are required before enrolling in a course, they will be identified in the course description or by an indication of course sequence. Courses listed as ACC 111-112 and ENG 111-112, for example, must be taken in sequence unless otherwise noted in the course description. Courses in special sequences (usually identified by the numerals I-II or I-II-III) must also be taken in sequence unless otherwise noted in the course description. The prerequisites must be completed satisfactorily before enrolling in a course unless special permission is obtained from the school dean or designee. Co-requisite courses are to be taken simultaneously. GENERAL USAGE COURSES The following “General Usage Courses” apply to multiple curricula and may carry a variety of prefix designations. The descriptions of the courses are normally identical for each different prefix and are as follows: 90-190-290 COORDINATED INTERNSHIP  Provides supervised on-the-job training in selected health agencies, business, industrial, or service firms coordinated by the college. Credit/practice ratio not to exceed 1:5 hours. May be repeated for credit. Variable hours. 93-193-293 STUDIES IN

174

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

College Catalog 2016-2017

175

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE   ACCOUNTING ACC 117 Essentials of Accounting (3 cr.) Covers reading and understanding financial statements, internal control requirements for safeguarding assets, and accounting procedures necessary to complete the entire accounting cycle, including journals, ledgers, and financial statements. Prerequisites: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Competency in Math Essentials MTE 1-3 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests, or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. ACC 134 Small Business Taxes (3 cr.) Introduces taxes most frequently encountered in business. Includes payroll, sales, property, and income tax. Studies the fundamentals of income tax preparation of business taxes for small businesses organized as proprietorships, partnerships, limited liability companies, and S-corporations. Includes income tax preparation related to business assets; business of the home; employment taxes; withholding and estimated taxes; Schedules C, SE and 1040; self-employed retirement plans; tip reporting and allocation rules, etc. Also includes discussion and practice in recording of payroll for a small business. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ACC 212 Principles of Accounting II (3 cr.) Introduces accounting principles with respect to cost and managerial accounting. Focuses on the application of accounting information with respect to product costing, as well as its use within the organization to provide direction and to judge performance. Prerequisite: ACC 211 or equivalent or school approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. ACC 215 Computerized Accounting (3 cr.) Introduces the computer in solving accounting problems. Focuses on operation of computers. Presents the accounting cycle and financial statement preparation in a computerized system and other applications for financial and managerial accounting. Introduces the QuickBooks accounting software program. Prerequisite: ACC 117 or ACC 211, or equivalent, or school approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. ACC 217 Analyzing Financial Statements (3 cr.) Explains the generation and limitations of data, techniques for analyzing the flow of a business's funds, and the methods of selecting and interpreting financial ratios. Offers analytical techniques through the use of comprehensive case studies. Highlights the evolution of financial statement reporting, the conceptual framework, and GAAP analysis. Prerequisite: ACC 211 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ACC 198 Seminar and Project: Accounting Capstone (3 cr.) Provides students an opportunity to integrate skills learned in prior accounting courses and apply those skills to the real-world practice of accounting through a business simulation project. Prepares students to complete the Certified Bookkeeper examination given by the American Institute of Public Bookkeepers (AIPB) using a review course prepared by the AIPB. Prerequisites: ACC 211 and ACC 134. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ACC 221 Intermediate Accounting I (3 cr.) Covers accounting principles and theory, including a review of the accounting cycle and accounting for current assets, current liabilities, and investments. Also addresses wholesaler transactions and inventory, fixed assets, natural resources, and intangible assets. Introduces various accounting approaches and demonstrates the effect of these approaches on the financial statement users. Prerequisite: ACC 212 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ACC 211 Principles of Accounting I (3 cr.) Introduces accounting principles with respect to financial reporting. Demonstrates how decision-makers use accounting information for reporting purposes. Focuses on the preparation of accounting information and its use in the operation of organizations, as well as methods of analysis and interpretation of accounting information. Prerequisites: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Competency in Math Essentials MTE 1-3 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests, or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ACC 222 Intermediate Accounting II (3 cr.) Continues accounting principles and theory with emphasis on accounting for fixed assets, intangibles, corporate capital structure, longterm liabilities, and investments. Consists of an extensive examination of topics for specified balance sheet accounts beyond the scope of a principles course. Focuses on the complex areas of balance sheet and income statement reporting for the corporate entity. Prerequisite: ACC 221 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

176

ACC 231 Cost Accounting I (3 cr.) Studies cost accounting methods and reporting as applied to job order, process, and standard cost accounting systems. Includes cost control, responsibility accounting, capital budgeting, and pricing decisions. Prerequisite: ACC 212 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ACC 240 Fraud Examination (3 cr.) Covers the principles and methodology of fraud detection and deterrence. Provides an introduction to the various ways fraud and occupational abuses occur, methods to identify the risk of exposure to loss from fraud, and appropriate prevention, detection, and investigation approaches. Also, covers recent developments in e-commerce and consumer fraud and the legal options for victims of fraud. Lecture 3 hours per week. ACC 241 Auditing I (3 cr.) Presents techniques of investigating, interpreting, and appraising accounting records and assertions. Studies internal control design and evaluation, evidence-gathering techniques, and other topics. Develops an understanding and appreciation of the philosophy of the audit process and its practice. Focuses on issues relevant to an external auditing professional, such as audit risk analysis, planning of audit engagements, internal controls, and substantive testing. Presents the preparation of audit working papers supporting an examination of the financial records and internal control procedures of an enterprise. Covers the report and opinion of the auditor to management, stockholders, and considers the ethical and legal responsibilities of the auditor. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: ACC 212 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. ACC 261 Principles of Federal Taxation I (3 cr.) Presents the study of federal taxation as it relates to individuals and related entities. Includes tax planning, compliance, and reporting. Covers gross income, deductions, and credits. Includes tax compliance and reporting. Emphasizes personal tax burden minimization and preparation of personal tax returns. Prerequisite: ACC 211 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE ADJ 100 Survey of Criminal Justice (3 cr.) Presents an overview of the United States criminal justice system; introduces the major system components: law enforcement, judiciary, and corrections. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 105 The Juvenile Justice System (3 cr.) Presents the evolution, philosophy, structures, and processes of the American juvenile delinquency system; surveys the rights of juveniles, dispositional alternatives, rehabilitation methods, and current trends. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ADJ 107 Survey of Criminology (3 cr.) Surveys the volume and scope of crime; considers a variety of theories developed to explain the causation of crime and criminality. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 116 Special Enforcement Topics (3 cr.) Considers contemporary issues, problems, and controversies in modern law enforcement. Prerequisite: ADJ 100. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 128 Patrol Administration and Operations (3 cr.) Studies the goals, methods, and techniques of police patrol with focus on the norms which govern work behavior in a police career. Examines the responsibilities of administrators and field supervisors of patrol in the local and state law enforcement agencies. Prerequisite: ADJ 100. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 130 Introduction to Criminal Law (3 cr.) Surveys the general principles of American criminal law, the elements of major crimes, and the basic steps of prosecution procedure. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 159 Physical Security (3 cr.) Studies the various forms of perimeter barriers which impact upon security operations; examines insurance considerations, underwriters licensing certification, fire prevention and fire code regulations, and the general health and safety requirements for all employees and contact persons within the organization. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 161 Introduction to Computer Crime (3 cr.) Provides a basic introduction to the nature of computer crimes, computer criminals, relevant law, investigative techniques, and emerging trends. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 195 Topics in Administration of Justice: Intelligence Analysis and Security Management (3 cr.) Examines intelligence analysis and its indispensable relationship to the security management of terrorist attacks, man-made disasters, and natural disasters. It also explores vulnerabilities of our national defense and private sectors as well as the threats posed to these institutions by terrorists, man-made disasters, and natural disasters. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ADJ 195 Topics in Administration of Justice: Introduction to Homeland Security (3 cr.) Presents students with an overview of the vocabulary and important components of homeland security. Discusses the importance of agencies associated with homeland security and their interrelated duties and responsibilities. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 229 Law Enforcement and the Community (3 cr.) Considers current efforts by law enforcement personnel to achieve an effective working relationship with the community. Surveys and analyzes various interactive approaches of law enforcement agencies and the citizenry they serve. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 195 Topics in Administration of Justice: Transportation and Border Security (3 cr.) Provides an overview of modern border and transportation security challenges and the different methods employed to address these challenges from post 9/11 to the present. Focuses on legal, economic, political, and cultural concerns and impacts associated with transportation and border security. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 233 Digital Crime and Digital Terrorism (3 cr.) Provides instruction in the techniques and practices used to identify incidents of digital crime and digital terrorism, methods of detection of incidents, methods of protection from digital crime and digital terrorism, and the future of digital crime and digital terrorism. Prerequisites: ADJ 100, ADJ 107, or ADJ 201, basic computer literacy, experience using the Internet, or permission of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 201 Criminology (3 cr.) Studies current and historical data pertaining to criminal and other deviant behavior. Examines theories that explain crime and criminal behavior in human society. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 212 Criminal Law, Evidence, and Procedures II (3 cr.) Teaches the elements of proof for major and common crimes and the legal classification of offenses. Studies the kinds, degrees, and admissibility of evidence and its presentation in criminal proceedings with emphasis on legal guidelines for methods and techniques of evidence acquisition. Surveys the procedural requirements from arrest to final disposition in the various American court systems with focus on the Virginia jurisdiction. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 227 Constitutional Law for Justice Personnel (3 cr.) Surveys the basic guarantees of liberty described in the U. S. Constitution and the historical development of these restrictions on government power, primarily through U. S. Supreme Court decisions. Reviews rights of free speech, press, and assembly, as well as criminal procedure guarantees (to counsel, jury trial, habeas corpus, etc.) as they apply to the activities of those in the criminal justice system. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 228 Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (3 cr.) Surveys the historical and current usage of narcotics and dangerous drugs. Teaches the identification and classification of such drugs and emphasizes the symptoms and effects on their users. Examines investigative methods and procedures utilized in law enforcement efforts against illicit drug usage. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADJ 234 Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism (3 cr.) Surveys the historical and current practices of terrorism that are national, transnational, or domestic in origin. Includes biological, chemical, nuclear, and cyber terrorism. Teaches the identification and classification of terrorist organizations, violent political groups, and issue-oriented militant movements. Examines investigative methods and procedures utilized in counter-terrorist efforts domestically and internationally. Prerequisites: ADJ 100 and ADJ 107 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 236 Principles of Criminal Investigation (3 cr.) Surveys the fundamentals of criminal investigation procedures and techniques. Examines crime scene search and collecting, handling, and preserving evidence. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 240 Techniques of Interviewing (3 cr.) Provides the student with essential skills and techniques necessary to obtain quality information from victims, witnesses, and suspects regarding criminal activity. Emphasizes locations and settings for interviews, kinesics, proxemics, and paralinguistics of both the interviewer and interviewee. Prerequisite: Students enrolling in the course must be certified law enforcement personnel currently employed in a police agency. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 246 Correctional Counseling (3 cr.) Presents concepts and principles of interviewing and counseling as applied in the correctional setting. Lecture 3 hours per week. ADJ 290 Coordinated Internship in Administration of Justice (3 cr.) Provides supervised on-the-job training in selected business, industrial, or service firms coordinated by the college. Laboratory 15 hours per week.

177

REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ADJ 295 Topics in Administration of Justice: Use of Force (3 cr.) Focuses on issues related to use of force in law enforcement. Includes court cases, policies and procedures, media and politics, and the tools and techniques used by law enforcement personnel. Prerequisites: ADJ 100 or LGL 110; ADJ 130 or LGL 218. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT TECHNOLOGY AST 101 Keyboarding I (3 cr.) Teaches the alpha/numeric keyboard with emphasis on correct techniques, speed, and accuracy. Teaches formatting of basic personal and business correspondence, reports, and tabulation using a software package. Lecture 3 hours per week. AST 102 Keyboarding II (3 cr.) Develops keyboarding and document production skills with emphasis on preparation of specialized business documents. Continues skill-building for speed and accuracy. Prerequisite: AST 101. Lecture 3 hours per week. AST 107 Editing/Proofreading Skills (3 cr.) Develops skills essential to creating and editing business documents. Covers grammar, spelling, diction, punctuation, capitalization, and other usage problems. Lecture 3 hours per week. AST 137 Records Management (3 cr.) Teaches filing and records management procedures for hard copy, electronic, and micrographic systems. Identifies equipment, supplies, and solutions to records management problems. Lecture 3 hours per week. AST 141 Word Processing I (3 cr.) Teaches creating and editing documents, including line and page layouts, columns, fonts, search/replace, cut/paste, spell/thesaurus, and advanced editing and formatting features of word processing software. Prerequisite: AST 101 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. AST 142 Word Processing II (3 cr.) Teaches advanced software applications. Prerequisite: AST 141 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. AST 190 Coordinated Internship in Administrative Support Technology (3 cr.) Provides supervised on-the-job training in selected business, industrial, or service firms coordinated by the college. Laboratory 15 hours per week. AST 205 Business Communications (3 cr.) Teaches techniques of oral and written communications. Emphasizes writing and presenting business-related materials. Prerequisite: ENG 111 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

178

AST 243 Office Administration I (3 cr.) Develops an understanding of the administrative support role and the skills and knowledge necessary to provide organizational and technical support in a contemporary office setting. Emphasizes the development of critical-thinking, problem-solving, and job performance skills in a business office environment. Prerequisite: AST 101. Lecture 3 hours per week. AST 245 Medical Machine Transcription (3 cr.) Develops machine transcription skills, integrating operation of transcribing equipment with understanding of medical terminology. Emphasizes dictation techniques and accurate transcription of medical documents in prescribed formats with proper grammar and punctuation. Prerequisite or Corequisite: AST 102 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. AST 260 Presentation Software (PowerPoint) (3 cr.) Teaches creation of slides, including use of text, clip art, and graphs. Includes techniques for enhancing presentations with on-screen slide show, as well as printing to transparencies and handouts. Incorporates use of sound and video clips. Lecture 3 hours per week.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE ASL 100 Orientation to Acquisition of ASL as an Adult (2 cr.) Presents a brief introduction to the U.S. Deaf Community, focusing on the differences in language and literature. Introduces many common pitfalls experienced by adults when acquiring ASL as a second language. Provides students with experience bridging spoken English and ASL via use of visual-gestural, nonverbal communication. Introduces students to the various ASL and IE curricular options offered at Reynolds. Lecture 2 hours per week. ASL 101 American Sign Language I (4 cr.) Introduces the fundamentals of American Sign Language (ASL) used by the Deaf Community, including basic vocabulary, syntax, fingerspelling, and grammatical nonmanual signals. Focuses on communicative competence. Develops gestural skills as a foundation for ASL enhancement. Introduces cultural knowledge and increases understanding of the Deaf Community. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

ASL 102 American Sign Language II (4 cr.) Introduces the fundamentals of American Sign Language (ASL) used by the Deaf Community, including basic vocabulary, syntax, fingerspelling, and grammatical nonmanual signals. Focuses on communicative competence. Develops gestural skills as a foundation for ASL enhancement. Introduces cultural knowledge and increases understanding of the Deaf Community. Part II of II. Prerequisite: ASL 101. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week. ASL 115 Fingerspelling and Number Use in ASL (2 cr.) Provides intensive practice in comprehension and production of fingerspelled words and numbers with emphasis on clarity and accuracy. Focuses on lexicalized fingerspelling and numeral incorporation as used by native users of American Sign Language. Prerequisite: ASL 101 or program head placement. Lecture 2 hours per week. ASL 125 History and Culture of the Deaf Community I (3 cr.) Examines the history of the Deaf Community and presents an overview of various aspects of Deaf Culture, including educational and legal issues. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. ASL 208 ASL for Classroom Settings (3 cr.) Provides extensive instruction of vocabulary and concepts used in content areas covered in elementary and high school classrooms. Focuses on comprehension and production of content-related information in American Sign Language with emphasis on sign production clarity and conceptual accuracy. Prerequisite: ASL 102 or program head placement. Lecture 3 hours per week. ASL 210 ASL Storytelling (3 cr.) Focuses on the elements of storytelling in American Sign Language and the techniques that deaf individuals utilize to pass on the histories and traditions of the deaf community. Emphasizes comprehension and production of short stories in American Sign Language with emphasis on sign production clarity and conceptual accuracy. Prerequisite: ASL 295 -Topics in ASL: American Sign Language IV or program head placement. Lecture 3 hours per week. ASL 212 Advanced Fingerspelling and Number Use in ASL (2 cr.) Provides intensive practice in advanced comprehension and production of fingerspelled words and numbers with emphasis on clarity and accuracy. Focuses on lexicalized fingerspelling and numeral incorporation as used by native users of American Sign Language. Prerequisites: ASL 102 and ASL 115 or program head placement. Lecture 2 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ASL 220 Comparative Linguistics: ASL and English (3 cr.) Describes spoken English and ASL (American Sign Language) on five levels: phonological, morphological, lexical, syntactic, and discourse. Compares and contrasts the two languages on all five levels using real-world examples. Documents similarities between signed languages and spoken languages in general. Describes the major linguistic components and processes of English and ASL. Introduces basic theories regarding ASL structure. Emphasizes ASL's status as a natural language by comparing and contrasting similarities and unique differences between the two languages. Prerequisites: ASL 295 -- Topics in ASL: American Sign Language III and ENG 111. Lecture 3 hours per week. ASL 225 Literature of the U.S. Deaf Community (3 cr.) Presents an overview of various aspects of literature common in the U.S. Deaf Community, including those forms written in English and those forms signed in ASL. Applies the recurring themes and metaphors in the context of the history of the U.S. Deaf Community. Prerequisites: ASL 125, ASL 295 -- Topics in ASL: American Sign Language IV, ASL 220, and ENG 111. Lecture 3 hours per week. ASL 261 American Sign Language V (3 cr.) Develops advanced American Sign Language comprehension and production skills. Emphasizes advanced linguistic aspects of ASL. Presents ASL literary forms. Encourages contact with the deaf community. Part I of II. Prerequisite: ASL 295 --Topics in ASL: American Sign Language IV or program head placement. Lecture 3 hours per week. ASL 262 American Sign Language VI (3 cr.) Develops advanced American Sign Language comprehension and production skills. Emphasizes advanced linguistic aspects of ASL. Presents ASL literary forms. Encourages contact with the deaf community. Part II of II. Prerequisite: ASL 295 -- Topics in ASL: American Sign Language IV or program head placement. Lecture 3 hours per week. ASL 295 Topics in ASL: American Sign Language III (3 cr.) Develops vocabulary, conversational competence, and grammatical knowledge with a total immersion approach. Introduces increasingly complex grammatical aspects, including those unique to ASL. Discusses culture and literature. Encourages contact with the Deaf Community to enhance linguistic and cultural knowledge. Part I of II. Prerequisite: ASL 102 or permission of instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ASL 295 Topics in ASL: American Sign Language IV (3 cr.) Develops vocabulary, conversational competence, and grammatical knowledge with a total immersion approach. Introduces increasingly complex grammatical aspects, including those unique to ASL. Discusses culture and literature. Encourages contact with the Deaf Community to enhance linguistic and cultural knowledge. Part II of II. Prerequisite: ASL 295 --Topics in ASL: American Sign Language III. Lecture 3 hours per week. ASL 295 Topics in American Sign Language: Sign Tuning (3 cr.) Provides an opportunity to explore various language elements in ASL, including advanced and colloquial aspects of phonology, morphology, grammar/syntax, semantics, variation, and historical change. Prerequisite: ASL 295 -- Topics in ASL: American Sign Language III. Co-requisites: ASL 125 and ASL 220. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ARABIC ARA 101 Beginning Arabic I (4 cr.) Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and emphasizes basic Arabic sentence structure. Discusses the diversity of cultures in the Arab world. Part I of II. Prerequisite: Students must be functionally fluent in English. Lecture 4 hours per week. ARA 102 Beginning Arabic II (4 cr.) Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and emphasizes basic Arabic sentence structure. Discusses the diversity of cultures in the Arab world. Part II of II. Prerequisites: ARA 101 and functional fluency in English. Lecture 4 hours per week. ARA 201 Intermediate Arabic I (3 cr.) Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills, and emphasizes basic Arabic sentence structure. Discusses the diversity of cultures in the Arab world. Classes are conducted in Arabic. Prerequisite: ARA 102. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ARCHITECTURE ARC 121 Architectural Drafting I (3 cr.) Introduces techniques of architectural drafting, including lettering, dimensioning, and symbols. Requires production of plans, sections, and elevations of a simple building. Studies use of common reference material and the organization of architectural working drawings. Requires development of a limited set of working drawings, including a site plan, related details, and pictorial drawings. Part I of II. Prerequisite: DRF 231 or school approval. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

ARC 122 Architectural Drafting II (3 cr.) Introduces techniques of architectural drafting, including lettering, dimensioning, and symbols. Requires production of plans, sections, and elevations of a simple building. Studies use of common reference material and the organization of architectural working drawings. Requires development of a limited set of working drawings, including a site plan, related details, and pictorial drawings. Part II of II. Prerequisite: ARC 121 or school approval. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. ARC 131 Materials and Methods of Construction I (3 cr.) Covers use of wood as a building material in all phases of construction. Deals with species used, growth characteristics, hygroscopic properties, and applications of lumber and plywood. Includes wood framing systems, premanufactured components, modular systems, windows, doors, cabinets, and flooring. Lecture 3 hours per week. ARC 132 Materials and Methods of Construction II (3 cr.) Studies masonry and concrete materials related to the construction industry: materials, mixtures, handling and placing, finishing and curing, and protection of concrete work. Includes brick and cementitious materials, mortar, and workmanship, and iron, steel, and aluminum as used in construction. Lecture 3 hours per week. ARC 199 Supervised Study in Architectural Design: Architectural Drafting III (3 cr.) Provides fundamental knowledge of the principles and techniques of architectural drawings and procedures. Familiarizes students with design process to provide a better understanding of the relationship between architectural design and structural systems. Computer-aided design/drafting begins to assume a dominant role in the drawing production process. Prerequisites: ARC 122 or equivalent and DRF 231. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ARC 211. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. ARC 201 History of Modern Architecture (3 cr.) Surveys architecture from 19th century to present, with emphasis on philosophy of design, form, and structure. Prerequisite: ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. ARC 211 Computer-Aided Drafting Applications (3 cr.) Utilizes computer hardware and software to create orthographic and pictorial drawings. Requires creation of working drawings by adding the necessary sections, dimensions, and notes to the computer-generated views. Prerequisite: DRF 231 or equivalent. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ARC 212 Architectural Drafting III (3 cr.) Provides fundamental knowledge of the principles and techniques of architectural drawings and procedures. Familiarizes students with the design process to provide a better understanding of the relationship between architectural design and structural systems. Computer-aided design/drafting begins to assume a dominant role in the drawing production process. Prerequisites: ARC 122 or equivalent and DRF 231. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ARC 211. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. ARC 213 Architectural Drafting IV (3 cr.) Requires preparation of complete set of working drawings according to principles and techniques of architectural drawing procedures used in professional firms. CAD is the primary means for drawing production, as well as design presentation, including 3D renderings and animations. Prerequisites: ARC 212 or equivalent and DRF 232. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. ARC 221 Architectural CAD Applications Software I (3 cr.) Teaches the principles and techniques of architectural drawing practices through the use of architecture specific CAD software. Utilizes the commands and features of the software to generate drawings that emphasize architectural design and structural systems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

ARC 299 Supervised Study in Architecture: Architectural Drafting IV (3 cr.) Requires preparation of complete set of working drawings according to principles and techniques of architectural drawing procedures used in professional firms. CAD is the primary means for drawing production, as well as design presentation, including 3D renderings and animations. Prerequisite: ARC 212 or equivalent and DRF 232. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

ART 121 Drawing I (4 cr.) Develops basic drawing skills and understanding of visual language through studio instruction/lecture. Introduces concepts, such as proportion, space, perspective and tone, and composition as applied to still life, landscape, and the figure. Uses drawing media, such as pencil, charcoal, ink wash, and color media. Includes field trips and gallery assignments as appropriate. Part I of II. Lecture 2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

ARTS

ART 122 Drawing II (4 cr.) Develops basic drawing skills and understanding of visual language through studio instruction/lecture. Introduces concepts, such as proportion, space, perspective, tone, and composition as applied to still life, landscape, and the figure. Uses drawing media, such as pencil, charcoal, ink wash, and color media. Includes field trips and gallery assignments as appropriate. Part II of II. Prerequisite: ART 121 or permission of the instructor. Lecture 2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

ART 100 Art Appreciation (3 cr.) Introduces art from prehistoric times to the present day. Describes architectural styles, sculpture, photography, printmaking, and painting techniques. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. ART 101 History and Appreciation of Art I (3 cr.) Presents the history and interpretation of architecture, sculpture, and painting. Begins with prehistoric art and follows the development of western civilization to the present. ART 101 and 102 may be taken out of order. Part I of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ARC 222 Architectural CAD Applications Software II (3 cr.) Uses advanced features of architectural CAD software to teach students to develop working drawings and details that adhere to the practices and techniques of architectural drawing principles. Prerequisite: ARC 221. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

ART 102 History and Appreciation of Art II (3 cr.) Presents the history and interpretation of architecture, sculpture, and painting. Begins with prehistoric art and follows the development of western civilization to the present. ART 101 and 102 may be taken out of order. Part II of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ARC 241 Building Mechanical Systems (3 cr.) Studies components and design for systems in residential and commercial building. Covers plumbing supply and drainage, including storm drainage and private sewage disposal. Requires calculation of overall heat balances for buildings as basis for design of heating and cooling systems. Prerequisite: ARC 122 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ART 105 Art in World Culture (3 cr.) Approaches the visual arts conceptually rather than historically. Develops a nontechnical understanding of spatial arts such as architecture and industrial design. Includes painting, sculpture, and graphics. Prerequisites: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ARC 242 Building Electrical Systems (3 cr.) Studies components and design for lighting and electrical systems, security, fire, and smoke alarms. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ART 106 History of Modern Art (3 cr.) Surveys the history of modern architecture, sculpture, painting, and graphic arts in representational and nonrepresentational forms. Focuses on the periods and movements that influenced the arts of the twentieth century. Emphasizes contemporary art forms, particularly the interaction between art and society, industry, and design. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ARC 295 Topics in Architecture: Building Information Modeling (3 cr.) Teaches advanced operations in buildinginformation-modeling. Prerequisite: ARC 211 or equivalent. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

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ART 125 Introduction to Painting (3 cr.) Introduces study of color, composition, and painting techniques. Places emphasis on experimentation and enjoyment of oil and/or acrylic paints and the fundamentals of tools and materials. This course is intended to be an art elective for students who do not plan to pursue a degree in the visual arts. Lecture 2 hours. Studio instruction 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. ART 131 Fundamentals of Design I (4 cr.) Explores the concepts of two- and threedimensional design and color. May include field trips as required. Part I of II. Lecture 2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week. ART 133 Visual Arts Foundation (4 cr.) Covers tools and techniques, design concepts and principles, color theory, and an introduction to the computer for graphic use. Applies to all fields of Visual Art. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week. ART 138 Figure Drawing (3 cr.) Develops drawing skills for the beginning and experienced students. Explores a broad range of drawing problems dealing with the human figure in costume using various media and techniques. Prerequisite: ART 120 or equivalent course or school approval. Lecture 2 hours. Studio instruction 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ART 217 Electronic Graphic Design I (4 cr.) Focuses on creative concepts of graphic design problem-solving using electronic technology; includes techniques specific to computergenerated publication design and imagery. Required for students pursuing careers in graphic design with emphasis on use of the computer. Part I of II. Prerequisites: ART 131 and passing score on computer competency exam or satisfactory completion of ITE 115 or CSC 155 or equivalent. Lecture 2 hours. Studio Instruction 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week. ART 241 Painting I (4 cr.) Introduces abstract and representational painting in acrylic and/or oil with emphasis on color composition and value. Part I of II. Prerequisite: ART 122 or instructor's approval. Lecture 2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week. ART 242 Painting II (4 cr.) Introduces abstract and representational painting in acrylic and/or oil with emphasis on color composition and value. Part II of II. Prerequisite: ART 122 or instructor's approval. ART 241 and ART 242 must be taken in order except with instructor's approval. Lecture 2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week. ART 243 Watercolor I (3 cr.) Presents abstract and representational painting in watercolor with emphasis on design, color, composition, technique, and value. Prerequisite: ART 131 or instructor's approval. Lecture 1.5 hours. Studio instruction 3.5 hours. Total 5 hours per week. ART 293 Studies in Art: Painting (4 cr.) Provides directed study in painting in the student's chosen medium with emphasis on investigation of personal style and development of portfolio. Prerequisite: ART 242 or instructor's approval. Lecture 2 hours. Studio instruction 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

AUTOMOTIVE AUT 101 Introduction to Automotive Systems (3 cr.) Introduces fundamental systems of automobile, the engine fuel, exhaust, electric, ignition, lubrication, cooling, transmission, steering, brake, and suspension systems. Teaches theory and function of each system. Demonstrates operation. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. AUT 111 Automotive Engines I (4 cr.) Presents analysis of power, cylinder condition, valves, and bearings in the automotive engine to establish the present condition, repairs, or adjustments. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

AUT 112 Automotive Engines II (3 cr.) Continues study of the analysis of power, cylinder condition, valves, and bearings in the automotive engine to establish the present condition, repairs, or adjustments. Prerequisite: AUT 111. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. AUT 126 Auto Fuel and Ignition Systems (5 cr.) Studies automobile ignition and fuel systems and their functions in operation of the engine. Includes carburetors, fuel pumps, ignition systems, troubleshooting, engine testing and adjustment, and tune-up. Prerequisite AUT 242. Lecture 4 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 7 hours per week. AUT 130 Introduction to Auto Mechanics (2 cr.) Introduces auto mechanics, including auto shop safety and tool identification and use. Explains automobile system theory and function. Stresses quality work practices and job opportunities. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 4 hours per week. AUT 136 Automotive Vehicle Inspection (2 cr.) Presents information on methods for performing automotive vehicle safety inspection. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week. AUT 156 Small Gasoline Engines (2 cr.) Studies small gasoline engine operating principles, construction, design, variety, and their many purposes. Gives instruction on two-cycle and four-cycle small gas engines, their construction, design, fuel system, ignition system, and lubricating systems. Demonstrates disassembly, reconditioning, overhaul, and reassembly in the lab. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 4 hours per week. AUT 165 Auto Diagnosis and Tune-Up (2 cr.) Presents the techniques for diagnosis of malfunctions in systems of the automobile. Uses dynamometers, oscilloscopes, and other specialized diagnostic and testing equipment. Demonstrates tune-up of conventional and rotary engines. Prerequisite AUT 126. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 4 hours per week. AUT 178 Automotive Final Drive and Manual Transmission Systems (4 cr.) Presents the operation, design, construction, and repair of manual transmissions and final drive systems for both front and rear drive vehicles. Includes clutches, synchronizers, and torque multiplication/gear reduction, along with differentials, transmission/transaxles, drive axles, U-joints, CV joints, 4-wheel drive, and all-wheel drive systems. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

AUT 193 Studies in Automotive: Automotive Electronic Safety Control Systems (3 cr.) Introduces advanced automotive electronic safety control systems, including driver alert, unintended lane departure, blind spot detection, active headlights, and electronic control of braking systems. Addresses diagnostic procedures and maintenance of electronic safety control systems, the theory and function of each system, and operation of each system. Lecture 3 hours per week. AUT 197 Cooperative Education in Automotive (2 cr.) Provides on-the-job training for automotive technology students. Laboratory 10 hours per week. AUT 230 Introduction to Alternative Fuels and Hybrid Vehicles (3 cr.) Introduces current trends in alternative fueled vehicles, including current alternative fueled vehicles and the implication and safety precautions necessary for working on hybrid vehicle systems. Lecture 3 hours per week. AUT 236 Automotive Climate Control (4 cr.) Introduces principles of refrigeration, airconditioning controls, and adjustment and general servicing of automotive airconditioning systems. Prerequisite AUT 241. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. AUT 241 Automotive Electricity I (3 cr.) Introduces electricity, magnetism, symbols, and circuitry as applied to the alternators, regulators, starters, lighting systems, instruments and gauges, and accessories. Part I of II. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. AUT 242 Automotive Electricity II (3 cr.) Introduces electricity, magnetism, symbols, and circuitry as applied to alternators, regulators, starters, lighting systems, instruments and gauges, and accessories. Part II of II. Prerequisite: AUT 241. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. AUT 243 Automotive Control Electronics (4 cr.) Covers the electronic control systems found in hybrid electric vehicle systems, battery electric vehicle systems, and fuel cell electric vehicle systems. Teaches theory, function, and operation of each electronic control system and provides students an opportunity to perform diagnostic procedures and maintenance for these systems. Focuses on safety. Prerequisites: Experience in the automotive repair field, AUT 241, AUT 242, AUT 245, and AUT 230 or approval of the program head. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE AUT 245 Automotive Electronics (4 cr.) Introduces the field of electronics as it applies to the modern automobile. Emphasizes basic circuit operation and diagnosis and repair of digital indicator and warning systems. Prerequisites: AUT 241 and AUT 242. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

AUT 266 Auto Alignment, Suspension, and Steering (3 cr.) Introduces use of alignment equipment in diagnosing, adjusting, and repairing front and rear suspensions. Deals with repair and servicing of power and standard steering systems. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 7 hours per week.

BIO 100 Basic Human Biology (3 cr.) Presents basic principles of human anatomy and physiology. Discusses cells, tissues, and selected human systems. Not intended for students in college transfer AA or AS degree. Prerequisite: Completion of ENF 2, if required by placement test or instructor/advisory approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.

AUT 251 Automatic Transmissions (4 cr.) Studies several types of automatic transmissions, torque converters, and their principles of operation. Includes adjustment, maintenance, and rebuilding. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

AUT 293 Studies in Automotive: Automotive Electronic Guidance Control Systems (3 cr.) Introduces advanced automotive electronic systems, including GPS navigation, communication, and guidance control systems. Covers the theory, function, operation, diagnostic procedures, and maintenance of each system. Emphasizes safety. Prerequisite: AUT 193 - Automotive Electronic Safety Control Systems. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

BIO 101 General Biology I (4 cr.) Focuses on foundations in cellular structure, metabolism, and genetics in an evolutionary context. Explores the core concepts of evolution; structure and function; information flow, storage and exchange; pathways and transformations of energy and matter; and systems biology. Emphasizes process of science, interdisciplinary approach, and relevance of biology to society. Part I of a twocourse sequence. Prerequisite: Completion of ENF 2 and MTE 1-3, if required by placement test. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

AUT 253 Electric Vehicles (4 cr.) Covers electric vehicle systems and advanced automotive electronics. Provides students an opportunity to perform diagnostic procedures and maintenance for electric vehicle systems. Teaches theory, function, and operation of electric vehicle systems. Focuses on safety. Prerequisites: Experience in the automotive repair field, AUT 241, AUT 242, AUT 245, and AUT 230 or approval of the program head. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. AUT 254 Plug-In Hybrid Vehicles (4 cr.) Covers plug-in hybrid electric vehicle systems, extended-range electric vehicle systems, and advanced automotive electronics. Teaches theory, function, and operation of each plug-in hybrid vehicle system and provides students an opportunity to perform diagnostic procedures and maintenance for these vehicles. Focuses on safety. Prerequisites: Experience in the automotive repair field, AUT 241, AUT 242, AUT 245, and AUT 230 or approval of the program head. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. AUT 256 Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (4 cr.) Covers hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle systems and advanced automotive electronics. Teaches theory, function, and operation of fuel cell electric vehicles and provides students an opportunity to perform diagnostic procedures and maintenance for fuel cell electric vehicle systems. Focuses on safety. Prerequisites: Experience in the automotive repair field, AUT 241, AUT 242, AUT 245, and AUT 230 or approval of the program head. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. AUT 265 Automotive Braking Systems (3 cr.) Presents operation, design, construction, repair, and servicing of braking systems, including Anti-Lock Brake Systems (ABS). Explains uses of tools and test equipment, evaluation of test results, and estimation of repair cost for power, standard, and disc brakes. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

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AUT 297 Cooperative Education in Automotive (2 cr.) Provides supervised on-the-job training for automotive technology students. Laboratory 10 hours per week.

BASIC SKILLS BSK 1 Whole Numbers (1 cr.) Covers whole number principles and computations. Develops the mathematical mastery necessary for MTE 1. Credits not applicable toward graduation. Lecture 4 hours per week for ¼ semester. BSK 41 Language Arts, Level 1 (2 cr.) Introduces basic reading and writing skills in preparation for subsequent courses by focusing on vocabulary development (simple phonics, dictionary skills), conventions of Standard English (basic grammar, punctuation, sentence structure), reading comprehension (reading process, topics), study skills (time management, textbook format), and critical thinking skills (fact and opinion). Lecture 2 hours per week.

BIOLOGY BIO 1 Foundations of Biology (4 cr.) Develops a basic understanding of plant and animal form, function, and relationships. Prepares students who have a deficiency in high school biology or may require a refresher course before beginning college-level biology. Taught as pass/fail, the course can be taken in subsequent semesters as necessary until course objectives are completed. The credits are not applicable to any of the college's academic programs, although high school-level biology or higher may be required for entrance into certain college-level programs. The credits do not transfer. Lecture 4 hours per week.

BIO 102 General Biology II (4 cr.) Focuses on diversity of life, anatomy and physiology of organisms, and ecosystem organization and processes in an evolutionary context. Explores the core concepts of evolution; structure and function; information flow, storage and exchange; pathways and transformations of energy and matter; and systems biology. Emphasizes process of science, interdisciplinary approach, and relevance of biology to society. Part II of a twocourse sequence. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of BIO 101. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. BIO 106 Life Science (4 cr.) Provides a topical approach to basic biological principles. Includes the scientific process, characteristics of living organisms, molecular aspects of cells, bioenergetics, cellular and organismal reproduction genetics, evolution, some human organ systems, and ecology. Designed for the non-science major. Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on the reading and writing placement test; students should not be enrolled in a remedial reading or writing course while enrolled in this course. Credit toward graduation cannot be awarded for both Biology 106 and Biology 101 or Biology 102. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BIO 107 Biology of the Environment (4 cr.) Presents the basic concepts of environmental science through a topical approach. Includes the scientific method, population growth and migration, use of natural resources and waste management, ecosystem simplification and recovery, evolution, biogeochemical cycles, photosynthesis and global warming, geological formations, atmosphere and climate, ozone depletion, pollution examples and anti-pollution laws, and acid deposition. Environmental Sustainability Designation: Course content related to the study of sustainable development. Prerequisite: Completion of ENF 2, if required by placement test or instructor/advisor approval. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. BIO 141 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 cr.) Integrates anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Integrates concepts of chemistry, physics, and pathology. Part I of II. Prerequisites: (1) BIO 101 (or an equivalent) or high school biology and chemistry completed within seven years of registering for this course with a grade of C or better or a score of 75% or higher on the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) or advisor approval, and (2) completion of ENF 2, if required by placement test, or instructor/advisor approval. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. BIO 142 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4 cr.) Integrates anatomy and physiology of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Integrates concepts of chemistry, physics, and pathology. Part II of II. Prerequisite: BIO 141. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. BIO 205 General Microbiology (4 cr.) Examines morphology, genetics, physiology, ecology, and control of microorganisms. Emphasizes application of microbiological techniques to selected fields. Prerequisites: BIO 101-102 and CHM 111-112 or equivalent, or permission of the School of Mathematics, Science, and Engineering. CHM 101-102 are acceptable equivalent courses. Credits for CHM 101-102 do not count toward the AS degree in Science. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. BIO 206 Cell Biology (4 cr.) Introduces the ultrastructure and functions of cells. Emphasizes cell metabolism, cell division, and control of gene expression. Prerequisite: One year of college biology and one year of college chemistry. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

BIO 231 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4 cr.) Integrates the study of gross and microscopic anatomy with physiology, emphasizing the analysis and interpretation of physiological data. Part I of II. Prerequisite: One year of college biology and one year of college chemistry or school approval. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. BIO 232 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4 cr.) Integrates the study of gross and microscopic anatomy with physiology, emphasizing the analysis and interpretation of physiological data. Part II of II. Prerequisites: One year of college biology and one year of college chemistry or school approval and BIO 231. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. BIO 256 General Genetics (4 cr.) Explores the principles of genetics ranging from classical Mendelian inheritance to the most recent advances in the biochemical nature and function of the gene. Includes experimental design and statistical analysis. Prerequisites: BIO 101, BIO 102, CHM 111, and CHM 112. Lecture 3 hours. Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. BIO 270 General Ecology (3 cr.) Studies interrelationships between organisms and their natural and cultural environments with emphasis on populations, communities, and ecosystems. Prerequisites: BIO 101 and 102 or departmental approval. Lecture 2 hours. Recitation and laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. BIO 299 Supervised Study in Biology: Advanced Microbiology (4 cr.) Assigns problems for independent study by the student, incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. Provides students the opportunity to research scientific literature on their selected topic, design and conduct a lab study, assemble and analyze observed lab data, and complete a final report on this research. Prerequisites: One year of college biology (BIO 101 and 102) and one semester of college chemistry (CHM 111 or CHM 101) or faculty approval. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: BIO 205. Lecture 4 hours per week.

BIO 299 Supervised Study in Biology: Intermediate Microbiology (2 cr.) Assigns problems for independent study by the student, incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. Provides students the opportunity to research scientific literature on their selected topic, design and conduct a lab study, assemble and analyze observed lab data, and complete a final report on this research. Prerequisites: One year of college biology and one semester of college chemistry or faculty approval. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: BIO 205. Lecture 2 hours per week. BIO 299 Supervised Study in Ecology: Advanced (4 cr.) Assigns problems for independent study by the student, incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. Provides students an opportunity to research scientific literature on their selected topic, design a field study to be conducted, assemble and analyze observed field data, and complete a final report on this research. Prerequisites: One year of college biology (including BIO 102) and MTH 163 or MTH 166 or faculty approval. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 8 hours per week. BIO 299 Supervised Study in Ecology: Intermediate (2 cr.) Assigns problems for independent study by the student, incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. Provides students the opportunity to research scientific literature on their selected topic, design a field study to be conducted, assemble and analyze observed field data, and complete a final report on this research. Prerequisites: One year of college biology (including BIO 102) and MTH 163 or MTH 166 or faculty approval. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

BUILDING BLD 101 Construction Management I (3 cr.) Presents overviews of all phases of construction project management. Introduces students to philosophy, responsibilities, methodology, and techniques of the construction process. Introduces topics related to the construction and design industries, organizations, construction contracts, bidding procedures, insurance, taxes, bonding, cost accounting, and business methods, including basic computer usage, safety, and general project management procedures. Lecture 3 hours per week. BLD 103 Principles of Residential Building Construction Inspection (3 cr.) Introduces general principles of residential building inspection including materials, foundations, framing, finishing, and building codes. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE BLD 199 Supervised Study in Building: Construction Management I (3 cr.) Presents overviews of all phases of construction project management. Introduces students to philosophy, responsibilities, methodology, and techniques of the construction process. Introduces topics related to the construction and design industries, organizations, construction contracts, bidding procedures, insurance, taxes, bonding, cost accounting, business methods, including basic computer usage, safety, and general project management procedures. Lecture 3 hours per week. BLD 200 Sustainable Construction (3 cr.) Teaches students the specialized construction management best practices that must be utilized when managing a sustainable project. Includes industry standards for green construction as identified by popular building rating systems. Lecture 3 hours per week. BLD 210 Building Structures (3 cr.) Introduces analysis and design of steel, wood, and reinforced concrete structural members, including loads, reactions, bending moments, stresses, and deflection for selection of beam and column sizes. Considers bolted and welded connections in steel design. Introduces determination of reinforcing steel sizes and arrangements in concrete members. Prerequisite: MTH 115. Lecture 3 hours per week. BLD 231 Construction Estimating (3 cr.) Focuses on materials takeoff and computing quantities from working drawings and specifications. Includes methods for computing quantities of concrete, steel, masonry, roofing, and excavation. Deals with pricing building components, materials and processes, as well as transportation and handling costs, markup discount procedures, equipment costs, and labor rates. Prerequisites: ARC 131 and ARC 132 or instructor's approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. BLD 247 Construction Planning and Scheduling (3 cr.) Introduces principles of planning and scheduling a construction project. Includes sequence of events and processes on a construction site. Studies scheduling techniques, including the critical path method. Lecture 3 hours per week.

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT/ ADMINISTRATION

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BUS 100 Introduction to Business (3 cr.) Presents a broad introduction to the functioning of business enterprise within the U.S. economic framework. Introduces economic systems, essential elements of business organization, production, human resource management, marketing, finance, and risk management. Develops business vocabulary. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 111 Principles of Supervision I (3 cr.) Teaches the fundamentals of supervision, including the primary responsibilities of the supervisor. Introduces factors relating to the work of supervisor and subordinates. Covers aspects of leadership, job management, work improvement, training and orientation, performance evaluation, and effective employee/supervisor relationships. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 116 Entrepreneurship (3 cr.) Presents the various steps considered necessary when going into business. Includes areas, such as product-service analysis, market research evaluation, setting up books, ways to finance start-up, operations of the business, development of business plans, buyouts versus starting from scratch, and franchising. Uses problems and cases to demonstrate implementation of these techniques. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 117 Leadership Development (3 cr.) Covers interpersonal relations in hierarchical structures. Examines the dynamics of teamwork, motivation, handling change and conflict, and how to achieve positive results through others. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 125 Applied Business Mathematics (3 cr.) Applies mathematical operations to business process and problems: wages and payroll, sales and property taxes, checkbook records and bank reconciliation, depreciation, overhead, distribution of profit and loss in partnerships, distribution of corporate dividends, commercial discounts, markup, markdown, simple interest, present values, bank discount notes, multiple payment plans, compound interest, annuities, sinking funds, and amortization. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 146 Introduction to Labor Relations (3 cr.) Examines history of the labor unions, labor contracts, bargaining processes, philosophy of unionism; use of bargaining techniques for non-wage issues; legal, social, and economic context of labor-management relations; responsibilities and duties of unions and management; analysis of public policy; and current state of the labor movement. May apply simulation and cases of arbitration and collective bargaining procedures. Lecture 3 hours per week.

BUS 165 Small Business Management (3 cr.) Identifies management concerns unique to small businesses. Introduces the requirements necessary to initiate a small business and identifies the elements comprising a business plan. Presents information establishing financial and administrative controls, developing a marketing strategy, managing business operations, and the legal and government relationships specific to small businesses. Prerequisite: BUS 116 or BUS 200 or school approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 200 Principles of Management (3 cr.) Teaches management and the management functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. Focuses on application of management principles to realistic situations managers encounter as they attempt to achieve organizational objectives. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 201 Organizational Behavior (3 cr.) Presents a behaviorally-oriented course combining the functions of management with the psychology of leading and managing people. Focuses on the effective use of human resources through understanding human motivation and behavior patterns, conflict management and resolution, group functioning and process, the psychology of decisionmaking, and the importance of recognizing and managing change. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 202 Applied Management Principles (3 cr.) Focuses on management practices and issues. May use case studies and/or management decision models to analyze problems in developing and implementing a business strategy, while creating and maintaining competitive advantage. Prerequisite: BUS 200. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 205 Human Resource Management (3 cr.) Introduces employment, selection, and placement of personnel; forecasting; job analysis; job descriptions; training methods and programs; employee evaluation systems; compensation; benefits; and labor relations. Includes procedures for management of human resources and uses case studies and problems to demonstrate implementation of these techniques. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BUS 208 Quality and Productivity Management (3 cr.) Focuses on the key quality improvement concepts regarding products and services, customers and suppliers, and systems and processes that make quality a part of the work life of an organization. Emphasizes the role of teams, including team meeting skills and techniques, and a variety of quality improvement tools, such as flowcharts, run charts, Pareto diagrams, cause and effect diagrams, evaluation matrices, and implementation road maps. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 209 Continuous Quality Improvement (3 cr.) Presents the different philosophies in Quality Control. Introduces students to Process Improvement, Team Development, Consensus Building, and Problem-Solving Strategies. Identifies methods for Process Improvement in manufacturing and service organizations, which includes Statistical Process Control when used in the quality control function of business and industry. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 220 Introduction to Business Statistics (3 cr.) Introduces statistics as a tool in decisionmaking. Emphasizes ability to collect, present, and analyze data. Employs measures of central tendency and dispersion, statistical inference, index numbers, probability theory, and time series analysis. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Keyboarding competence. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 221 Business Statistics I (3 cr.) Focuses on statistical methodology in the collection, organization, presentation, and analysis of data; concentrates on measures of central tendency, dispersion, probability concepts and distribution, sampling, statistical estimation, normal and T distribution and hypotheses for means and proportions. Prerequisite: MTH 163 or school approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 240 Introduction to Business Law (3 cr.) Presents an introduction to the American legal system, including an overview of the courts and civil and criminal law. Develops an indepth understanding of contracts, agency law, and business organizations. Also includes an overview of property, UCC Sales, and Commercial Paper. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 260 Planning for Small Business (3 cr.) Provides knowledge of the development of a business plan, which can be used to acquire capital and serve as a management guide. Combines knowledge that has been acquired in the areas of planning, management, and finance, using proforma statements and marketing. Covers internet searching techniques. Recommended as a capstone course. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

BUS 265 Ethical Issues in Management (3 cr.) Examines the legal, ethical, and social responsibilities of management. May use cases to develop the ability to think and act responsibly. Lecture 3 hours per week. BUS 290 Coordinated Internship in Business Management and Administration (3 cr.) Provides supervised on-the-job training in selected business, industrial, or service firms coordinated by the college. Laboratory 15 hours per week. BUS 298 Seminar and Project in Business Management and Administration (3 cr.) Requires completion of a project or research report related to the student's occupational objective and a study of approaches to the selection and pursuit of career opportunities in the field. Prerequisite: Students should have completed most of the management courses before enrolling in this course. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHEMISTRY CHM 1 Chemistry I (4 cr.) Presents basic inorganic and organic principles to students with little or no chemistry background. Taught as pass/fail, the course can be taken in subsequent semesters as necessary until course objectives are completed. The credits are not applicable to any of the college's academic programs, although high school-level chemistry or higher may be required for entrance into certain programs. The credits do not transfer. Prerequisite: MTE 3 or equivalent. Lecture 4 hours per week. CHM 101 General Chemistry I (4 cr.) Emphasizes experimental and theoretical aspects of inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry. Discusses general chemistry concepts as they apply to issues within our society and environment. Designed for the non-science major. Part I of II. Prerequisite: Competency in Math Essentials (MTE) units 1-6 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostics tests or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. CHM 102 General Chemistry II (4 cr.) Emphasizes experimental and theoretical aspects of inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry. Discusses general chemistry concepts as they apply to issues within our society and environment. Designed for the non-science major. Part II of II. Prerequisite: CHM 101 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

CHM 111 College Chemistry I (4 cr.) Explores the fundamental laws, theories, and mathematical concepts of chemistry. Designed primarily for science and engineering majors. Requires a strong background in mathematics. Part I of II. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MTH 163 or higher. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. CHM 112 College Chemistry II (4 cr.) Explores the fundamental laws, theories, and mathematical concepts of chemistry. Designed primarily for science and engineering majors. Requires a strong background in mathematics. Part II of II. Prerequisite: CHM 111. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. CHM 241 Organic Chemistry I (3 cr.) Introduces fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds, including structures, physical and chemical properties, syntheses, and typical reactions. Emphasizes reaction mechanisms. Part I of II. Prerequisite: CHM 112 or equivalent. Co-requisite: CHM 245. Lecture 3 hours per week. CHM 242 Organic Chemistry II (3 cr.) Introduces fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds, including structures, physical and chemical properties, syntheses, and typical reactions. Emphasizes reaction mechanisms. Part II of II. Prerequisite: CHM 241. Co-requisite: CHM 246. Lecture 3 hours per week. CHM 243 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1 cr.) Provides a laboratory experience for students in organic synthesis and qualitative organic analysis. Part I of II. Prerequisite: CHM 112 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CHM 241. Laboratory 3 hours per week. CHM 244 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1 cr.) Provides a laboratory experience for students in organic synthesis and qualitative organic analysis. Part II of II. Prerequisite: CHM 112 or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CHM 242. Laboratory 3 hours per week. CHM 245 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (2 cr.) Introduces fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds, structures, and properties. Emphasizes reaction mechanisms and synthesis. Includes qualitative organic analysis. Co-requisite: CHM 241. Laboratory 6 hours per week. CHM 246 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2 cr.) Introduces fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds, structures, and properties. Emphasizes reaction mechanisms and synthesis. Includes qualitative organic analysis. Co-requisite: CHM 242. Laboratory 6 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE CHM 260 Introductory Biochemistry (3 cr.) Explores fundamentals of biological chemistry. Includes study of macromolecules, metabolic pathways, and biochemical genetics. Prerequisites: CHM 112 and satisfactory placement score for ENG 111. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT CHD 118 Language Arts for Young Children (3 cr.) Emphasizes the early development of children's language and literacy skills. Presents techniques and methods for supporting all aspects of early literacy. Surveys children's literature, and examines elements of promoting oral literacy, print awareness, phonological awareness, alphabetic principle, quality storytelling, and story reading. Addresses strategies for intervention and support for exceptional children and English Language Learners. Prerequisites: Functional literacy in the English language and reading at the 12th grade level or approval of the instructor. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. CHD 119 Introduction to Reading Methods (3 cr.) Focuses on promoting language and literacy skills as the foundation for emergent reading. Emphasizes phonetic awareness and alphabetic principles, print awareness and concepts, comprehension, and early reading and writing. Addresses strategies for intervention and support for exceptional children and English Language Learners. Prerequisites: Placement test recommendation for ENG 111 or approval of the instructor. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. CHD 120 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3 cr.) Introduces early childhood development through activities and experiences in early childhood, pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, and primary programs. Investigates classroom organization and procedures, and use of classroom time and materials, approaches to education for young children, professionalism, and curricular procedures. Prerequisites: Functional literacy in the English language and reading at the 12th grade level or approval of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week. CHD 121 Childhood Educational Development I (3 cr.) Focuses attention on the observable characteristics of children from birth through adolescence. Concentrates on cognitive, physical, social, and emotional changes that occur. Emphasizes the relationship between development and child's interactions with parents, siblings, peers, and teachers. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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CHD 145 Teaching Art, Music, and Movement to Children (3 cr.) Focuses on children's exploration, play, and creative expression in the areas of art, music, and movement. Emphasis will be on developing strategies for using various open-ended media representing a range of approaches in creative thinking. Addresses strategies for intervention and support for exceptional children and English Language Learners. Prerequisites: Functional literacy in the English language and reading at the 12th grade level or approval of the instructor. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. CHD 146 Math, Science, and Social Studies for Children (3 cr.) Provides experiences in content, methods, and materials for the development of math, science, and social studies skills in children. Emphasis will be on developing strategies for using various resources to facilitate children's construction of knowledge. Addresses strategies for intervention and support for children with special needs and English Language Learners. Prerequisites: Functional literacy in the English language; reading at the 12th grade level or approval of the instructor. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. CHD 165 Observation and Participation in Early Childhood/Primary Settings (3 cr.) Focuses on observation as the primary method for gathering information about children in early childhood settings. Emphasizes development of skills in the implementation of a range of observation techniques. Prerequisites: Functional literacy in the English language and reading at the 12th grade level or approval of the instructor. Seminar 1 hour. Field placement 4 hours. Total 5 hours per week. CHD 166 Infant and Toddler Programs (3 cr.) Examines child growth and development from birth to 36 months. Focuses on development in the physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and language domains. Emphasizes the importance of the environment and relationships for healthy brain development during the child's first three years of life. Investigates regulatory standards for infant/toddler caregiving. Prerequisites: Functional literacy in the English language and reading at the 12th grade level or approval of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CHD 205 Guiding the Behavior of Children (3 cr.) Explores the role of the early childhood educator in supporting emotional and social development of children and in fostering a sense of community. Presents practical strategies for encouraging prosocial behavior, conflict resolution, and problem solving. Emphasizes basic skills and techniques in child guidance. Prerequisites: Functional literacy in the English language and reading at the 12th grade level or approval of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week. CHD 210 Introduction to Exceptional Children (3 cr.) Reviews the history of and legal requirements for providing intervention and educational services for children with special needs. Studies the characteristics of children with a diverse array of needs and developmental abilities. Explores concepts of early intervention, inclusion, guiding behavior, and adapting environments to meet children's needs. Lecture 3 hours per week. CHD 215 Models of Early Childhood Education Programs (3 cr.) Studies and discusses the various models and theories of early childhood education programs, including current trends and issues. Presents state licensing and staff requirements. Lecture 3 hours per week. CHD 216 Early Childhood Programs, School, and Social Change (3 cr.) Explores methods of developing positive, effective relations with families to enhance their developmental goals for children. Considers culture and other diverse needs, perspectives, and abilities of families and educators. Emphasizes advocacy and public policy awareness as an important role of early childhood educators. Describes risk factors and identifies community resources. Prerequisites: Functional literacy in the English language and reading at the 12th grade level or approval of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week. CHD 220 Introduction to School-Age Child Care (3 cr.) Examines the purposes of school-age child care in today's society, the role of adults within school-age child care, and the state of the profession of school-age child care. Lecture 3 hours per week. CHD 225 Curriculum Development for SchoolAge Child Care (3 cr.) Explores the creative activities, techniques, interactions, and program development that promote positive social and emotional growth in school-age children. Emphasizes positive development through everyday programming and experiences. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CHD 230 Behavior Management for SchoolAge Child Care (3 cr.) Discusses the development of social skills that school-age children need for self-management, including self-discipline, self-esteem, and coping with stress and anger. Explores ways to effectively guide and discipline school-age children, focusing on how adults can facilitate positive pro-social and self-management skills. Lecture 3 hours per week. CHD 235 Health and Recreation for SchoolAge Child Care (3 cr.) Examines the physical growth of school-age children and the role of health and recreation in school-age child development. Explores the use of medication, misuse of drugs, health issues of children, and the availability of community resources. Lecture 3 hours per week. CHD 265 Advanced Observation and Participation in Early Childhood/Primary Settings (3 cr.) Focuses on implementation of activity planning and observation of children through participation in early childhood settings. Emphasizes responsive teaching practices and assessment of children's development. Reviews legal and ethical implications of working with children. Prerequisites: Functional literacy in the English language and reading at the 12th grade level or approval of the instructor. Students must have completed the majority of program-specific courses before enrolling and must be eligible to work with young children according to Department of Social Services requirements. Seminar 1 hour. Field placement 4 hours. Total 5 hours per week. CHD 270 Administration of Child Care Programs (3 cr.) Examines the skills needed for establishing and managing early childhood programs. Emphasizes professionalism and interpersonal skills, program planning, staff selection and development, creating policies, budgeting, and developing forms for recordkeeping. Lecture 3 hours per week. CHD 298 Seminar and Project in Childhood Development: Portfolio Development (1 cr.) Requires the completion of a project or research report related to the student's occupational objectives and a study of approaches to the selection and pursuit of career opportunities in the field. Serves, in conjunction with CHD 265, as the capstone course for the Early Childhood Development Associate of Applied Science degree. Focuses on the development of a portfolio to demonstrate professional competence in the field of early care and education. The resulting portfolio will be reviewed by early childhood faculty and other designated early childhood professionals. Laboratory 2 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

CHINESE CHI 101 Beginning Chinese I (5 cr.) Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic Chinese sentence structure. Lecture 5 hours per week. CHI 102 Beginning Chinese II (5 cr.) This is the second semester of the twosemester course for beginners, or a refresher course for non-native speakers with other equivalent experience. In this course, students will continue their introduction to basic standard Mandarin Chinese, spoken by over a billion people in mainland China, Taiwan, Singapore, and other parts of the world. They will learn to comprehend, speak, read, and write on a variety of topics related to daily life. The course will also expand on the student's growing knowledge of essential aspects of Chinese culture. Prerequisite: CHI 101 or demonstrated proficiency or equivalence. Lecture 5 hours per week.

CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CIV 135 Construction Management and Estimating (3 cr.) Teaches the equipment and methods used in construction. Includes principles and economics of construction, planning and management, and principles of estimating primarily using highway and building project examples. Co-requisite: MTH 115 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. CIV 160 Transportation Engineering (3 cr.) Presents the practical application of transportation design, including administration, location studies, traffic surveys, alignment design, drainage design, intersection and interchange design, pavement types, and pavement design. Co-requisite: MTH 115 or instructor's approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. CIV 171 Surveying I (3 cr.) Introduces surveying equipment, procedures, and computations, including adjustment of instruments, distance measurement, leveling, angle measurement, traversing, traverse adjustments, area computations, and introduction to topography. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MTH 115 or equivalent. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. CIV 172 Surveying II (3 cr.) Introduces surveys for transportation systems, including the preparation and analysis of topographic maps, horizontal and vertical curves, earthwork, and other topics related to transportation construction. Prerequisite: CIV 171 or equivalent. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

CIV 190 Coordinated Internship in Civil Engineering (3 cr.) Provides supervised on-the-job training in selected business, industrial, or service firms coordinated by the college. Laboratory 15 hours per week. CIV 225 Soil Mechanics (2 cr.) Focuses on soil in its relationship to engineering construction. Includes soil composition and structure, weight-volume relationships, sampling procedures, classification systems, water in soil, stresses, strains, bearing capacity, settlement and expansion, compaction, stabilization, and introduction to foundations and retaining walls. Prerequisite: MTH 115 or equivalent. Lecture 2 hours per week. CIV 226 Soil Mechanics Laboratory (1 cr.) Introduces practical soil sampling; classification of unified, ASTM, and ASSHTO specifications; and laboratory testing of soils to predict engineering performance. Co-requisite: CIV 225. Laboratory 2 hours per week. CIV 241 Applied Hydraulics and Drainage I (3 cr.) Presents the basic fundamentals of hydrology and hydraulics to the practical problems of drainage design. Stresses the use of design aids with supportive theory to ensure an understanding of the background, the theory of development, basic assumptions and limitations of the various methods of estimating storm water runoff, and hydraulic structure design. Part I of II. Prerequisite: MTH 115 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. CIV 242 Applied Hydraulics and Drainage II (3 cr.) Presents the basic fundamentals of hydrology and hydraulics to the practical problems of drainage design. Stresses the use of design aids with supportive theory to ensure an understanding of the background, the theory of development, basic assumptions and limitations of the various methods of estimating storm water runoff, and hydraulic structure design. Part II of II. Prerequisite: CIV 241. Lecture 3 hours per week. CIV 256 Global Positioning Systems for Land Surveying (3 cr.) Introduces principles of satellite-based surveying and presents Global Positioning System (GPS) as it is utilized in land surveying and the various components of the GPS technology and the techniques through which the GPS technology may be used in land surveys. Utilizes field surveys using the GPS equipment as part of the laboratory activities. Covers the same content as GIS 256. Credit will not be granted for both courses. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE CIV 265 Curves and Earthwork (3 cr.) Studies computations of simple, compound, and transition curves; grades and vertical curves; and earthwork and haul quantities. Prerequisite: CIV 172 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. CIV 270 Utilizing Surveying Software (3 cr.) Introduces computer applications for conventional coordinate-geometry (COGO) calculations. Studies and evaluates numerous COGO software and their associated drafting packages. Includes calculations and drafting of traverse adjustment, subdivision, curves, and others. Prerequisite: CIV 172 or equivalent. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. CIV 280 Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3 cr.) Introduces the engineering elements of water and wastewater treatment, water distribution and wastewater collection systems, solid and hazardous waste, erosion control, and storm water management. Lecture 3 hours per week. CIV 299 Supervised Study in Civil Engineering: CAD for Hydraulics and Drainage Design (3 cr.) Assigns problems for independent study, incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. Develops expertise in the use of computer-aided design specifically in relation to the design of drainage and hydraulic systems as addressed in civil engineering projects. Prerequisite: MTH 115. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

COMMUNICATION STUDIES AND THEATRE CST 100 Principles of Public Speaking (3 cr.) Applies theory and principles of public address with emphasis on preparation and delivery. Lecture 3 hours per week. CST 110 Introduction to Speech Communication (3 cr.) Examines the elements affecting speech communication at the individual, small group, and public communication levels with emphasis on practice of communication at each level. Lecture 3 hours per week. CST 151 Film Appreciation I (3 cr.) Provides students with a critical understanding of film through the discussion and viewing of motion pictures with emphasis upon the study of film history and the forms and functions of film. Students will develop skills to analyze the shared social, cultural, and historical influences of films and their contexts. Prerequisites: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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CST 152 Film Appreciation II (3 cr.) Provides students with a critical understanding of film through the discussion and viewing of motion pictures with emphasis upon the study of film history and the forms and functions of film. Students will develop the skills to analyze the shared social, cultural, and historical influences of films and their contexts. The course focuses on the interplay of contemporary aspects of film creation such as diverse audiences, economic realities, and emerging media formats. Prerequisites: Fluency in standard American English; placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CSC 200 Introduction to Computer Science (3 cr.) Provides a broad introduction to computer science. Discusses architecture and the function of computer hardware, including networks and operating systems, data and instruction representation, and data organization. Covers software, algorithms, programming languages, and software engineering. Discusses artificial intelligence and theory of computation. Includes a hands-on component with oral and written presentations. Prerequisite: MTH 166 or equivalent with a grade of "C" or better. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CST 229 Intercultural Communication (3 cr.) Emphasizes the influence of culture on the communication process, including differences in values, message systems, and communication; focuses on the importance of culture in everyday living; acknowledges the growing need to communicate across cultures in an era of rapid globalization; and presents strategies for effective communication in a culturally-diverse workplace and community. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CSC 201 Computer Science I (4 cr.) Introduces algorithm and problem-solving methods. Emphasizes structured programming concepts, elementary data structures, and the study and use of a high-level programming language. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MTH 173 or equivalent or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week.

COMPUTER SCIENCE CSC 130 Scientific Programming (4 cr.) Introduces a science and engineeringoriented, high-level programming language. Studies the C language and its application in problem-solving in a structured programming environment. Includes the concepts and practice of structured programming, problemsolving, top-down design of algorithms, basic C syntax, control structures, arrays, and data structures. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MTH 173 or equivalent. Lecture 4 hours per week. CSC 155 Computer Concepts and Applications (3 cr.) Introduces basic hardware and software concepts of computer usage, programming languages, and the computer's impact on society. Includes applications of various types of software to illustrate how computers are used in sciences, social sciences, humanities, and education. Covers the use of an operating system, word processing, spreadsheets, e-mail, library access, database access and retrieval, presentation graphics, and the Internet. Lecture 3 hours per week.

CSC 202 Computer Science II (4 cr.) Examines data structures, introduction to object-oriented design, and algorithm analysis. Covers data structures (including sets, strings, stacks, queues, arrays, records, files, linked lists, and trees), polymorphism, inheritance, exceptions, interfaces, abstract data types, algorithm analysis (including searching and sorting methods), and file structures. Prerequisite: CSC 201 with a grade of "C" or better. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MTH 174. Lecture 4 hours per week. CSC 205 Computer Organization (4 cr.) Examines the hierarchical structure of computer architecture. Focuses on multi-level machine organization. A simple assembler language is used by students to complete programming projects. Includes processors, instruction execution, addressing techniques, data representation, and digital logic. Prerequisite: CSC 202. Lecture 4 hours per week. CSC 208 Introduction to Discrete Structures (3 cr.) Covers Boolean algebra, combinatorial and sequential circuits, algorithms and algorithm analysis, recursion, recurrence relations, graphs, and trees. Prerequisites: CSC 201 and MTH 287 with a grade of C or better. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS CSC 210 Programming with C++ (3 cr.) Covers advanced topics using the syntax of the C++ language. Includes language syntax, problem-solving techniques, topdown refinement, procedure definition, loop invariance, theory of numerical errors, program design, objects, classes, inheritance, files, strings, linked lists, stacks, queues, binary trees, recursion, and basic searching and sorting techniques, and debugging. Prerequisites: CSC 130, or CSC 201 and 202, or EGR 125, or permission of instructor. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MTH 173. Lecture 3 hours per week.

DENTAL ASSISTING DNA 100 Introduction to Oral Health Professions (1 cr.) Provides an introduction to the oral health professions and covers basic terminology, historical perspective, the credentialing process, accreditation, professional organizations, and legal and ethical considerations. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Completion of courses in the Pre-Dental Assisting Career Studies Certificate. Lecture 1 hour per week. DNA 103 Introduction to Oral Health (1 cr.) Teaches anatomy of the head and neck, the hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity, tooth morphology, deciduous and permanent dentition, as well as dental pathology and terminology. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Completion of courses in the Pre-Dental Assisting Career Studies Certificate. Lecture 1 hour per week. DNA 108 Dental Science (3 cr.) Studies head and neck anatomy, tooth morphology, pathological conditions of the oral cavity, disease processes, and microbiology. Prerequisite: Completion of courses in the PreDental Assisting Career Studies Certificate. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: DNA 100 and DNA 103. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. DNA 109 Practical Infection Control (3 cr.) Studies principles of management of diseaseproducing microorganisms and associated diseases. Emphasizes sterilization, asepsis, and disinfection techniques applicable in the dental office. Prerequisite: Completion of courses in Pre-Dental Assisting Career Studies Certificate. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: DNA 100, DNA 103, and DNA 108. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

DNA 110 Dental Materials (3 cr.) Studies the materials utilized in the laboratory aspect of dentistry as support in treatment. Emphasizes the characteristics, manipulation, economical control, storage, and delivery of materials. Prerequisite: Completion of courses in the Pre-Dental Assisting Career Studies Certificate. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: DNA 100, DNA 103, DNA 108, and DNA 109. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

DNA 134 Dental Radiology and Practicum (3 cr.) Teaches the physics of dental radiation and safety, equipment operation, cone placement for the parallel and bisection techniques, panoramic exposures, mounting, and film processing. Prerequisites: DNA 100, DNA 103, DNA 108, DNA 109, and DNA 110. Students must be at least 18 years old to enroll in course. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

DNA 113 Chairside Assisting I (3 cr.) Provides instruction on the principles of clinical chairside dental assisting, dental equipment use and maintenance, safety, instrument identification, tray set-ups by procedures, and patient data collection. Emphasizes patient management during restorative procedures. Prerequisite: Completion of courses in the PreDental Assisting Career Studies Certificate. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: DNA 100, DNA 103, DNA 108, DNA 109, and DNA 110. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

DNA 190 Coordinated Internship in Dental Assisting (2 cr.) Provides students clinical experience to supplement DNA 113 through hands-on experience in the dental clinic at Reynolds. Students will be assisting staff. Prerequisite: Completion of the Pre-Dental Assisting Career Studies Certificate. Prerequisites or Corequisites: DNA 100, DNA 103, DNA 108, DNA 109, DNA 110, and DNA 113. Laboratory 8 hours per week.

DNA 114 Chairside Assisting II (4 cr.) Introduces the student to the various dental specialties, including oral surgery, orthodontics, periodontics, prosthodontics, endodontics, and pediatric dentistry. Emphasizes integration and application of previous course content to operative dental procedures. Prerequisite: DNA 190. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 8 hours per week. DNA 119 Dental Therapeutics (1 cr.) Exposes students to concepts and terminology related to pharmacology, pain control, and dental medicinal agents. Emphasizes the use of materials in patient treatment. Prerequisites: DNA 100, DNA 103, DNA 108, DNA 109, and DNA 110. Lecture 1 hour per week. DNA 120 Community Health (1 cr.) Studies topics related to community health issues, including identification of specific diseases, symptoms, causes, and effects. Emphasizes the promotion of oral health in the community through patient education in oral home care techniques, dietary counseling, plaque control procedures, and application of medicinal agents. Prerequisites: DNA 100, DNA 103, DNA 108, DNA 109, and DNA 110. Lecture 1 hour per week. DNA 130 Dental Office Management (3 cr.) Exposes students to and provides practical experience in the legal aspects of dental office management with regard to ethics, jurisprudence, appointment control, recall systems, reception techniques, telephone techniques, accounts receivable and payable, payroll insurance claims, inventory control, and professional conduct in a dental office. Prerequisites: DNA 100 and DNA 103. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

DNA 196 On-Site Training in Dental Assisting (5 cr.) Provides clinical experience within the private practice community by exposing students to the fast-paced dental office environment in which the student performs chairside and support services with an established team. Focuses on chairside assisting in general dentistry at two different clinical sites. Students will complete the required number of clinical hours at the two assigned facilities. Prerequisites: DNA 100 through DNA 190. Laboratory 24 hours per week.

DENTAL LABORATORY DNL 100 Professional Ethics and Dental History (2 cr.) Introduces students to the dental professional and supporting personnel; history and development of dentistry; the role of dental auxiliaries in laboratory settings and to members of the dental lab craft and others of the dental health team; dental ethics and jurisprudence; professional and educational opportunities. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Successful completion of all placement tests. An interview with the program head is required to establish interest, motivation, and aptitudes for dental laboratory technology. Lecture 2 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE DNL 110 Dental Laboratory Materials (3 cr.) Studies chemical composition, physical properties, and uses of metallic and nonmetallic dental materials, dentures and tooth resins, porcelain, waxes and duplicating materials. The laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate the properties and uses of the materials studied, including their inherent limitations. Students observe fabrication procedure demonstrations and receive one-on-one instruction during part of the laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Students must successfully complete all placement tests and have an interview with the program head to determine interests, motivation, and aptitudes related to dental lab technology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. DNL 130 Introduction to Complete Dentures (6 cr.) Introduces the student to the basic principles, knowledge, and skills involved in the proper construction of complete dentures. Includes introduction to articulation and occlusal harmony followed by repair, relining, and reconstruction techniques. Students observe fabrication procedure demonstrations and receive one-on-one instruction during part of the laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Students must pass all placement tests and have an interview with the program head in order to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes related to dental lab technology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Total 12 hours per week. DNL 135 Introduction to Removable Partial Dentures (6 cr.) Introduces students to the principles of surveying and designing of removable partial denture frameworks followed by the fabrication and repair of removable partial dentures. Students will observe fabrication procedure demonstrations and receive one-on-one instruction during part of the laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Students must pass all placement tests and interview with the program head in order to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes in dental lab technology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Total 12 hours per week.

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DNL 137 Orthodontic and Pedodontic Appliances (3 cr.) Develops student's ability to fabricate and repair pedodontic and orthodontic appliances. This laboratory-didactic course utilizes programmed instruction augmented by individualized assistance and demonstration. Students observe fabrication procedure demonstrations and receive one-on-one instruction during part of the laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Students must interview with the program head to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes in dental lab technology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. DNL 138 Introduction to Fixed Prosthodontics (6 cr.) Introduces students to fixed prosthodontic restorations. The student practices the techniques of die preparation and the fabrication of inlays, crowns, and fixed partial dentures utilizing gold alloy, shaded acrylic, and composite materials. Students observe fabrication procedure demonstrations and receive one-on-one instruction during part of the laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. An interview with the program head is required to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes related to dental laboratory activities. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Total 12 hours per week. DNL 140 Dental Anatomy, Physiology, and Principles of Occlusion (5 cr.) Introduces students to human anatomy, physiology and occlusion. Emphasizes regions of the head and neck and the primary and permanent teeth. Provides a general overview of the masticatory system and the dynamics of mandibular movement. Includes laboratory exercises related to accurate scale drawings of the permanent teeth and tooth waxings of the permanent teeth. Features occlusal restorations fabricated in wax on a semiadjustable articulator according to functional criteria. Covers fabrication procedure and demonstrations. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Students must pass all placement tests and have an interview with the program head to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes relating to dental laboratory technology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 9 hours per week.

DNL 160 Removable Prosthodontic Techniques (3 cr.) Introduces the student to repairing, rebasing, and relining complete and partial dentures. Provides additional experience in fabricating upper and lower complete dentures. Introduces the student to mounting, setting of teeth, processing, and finishing removable partial dentures. Studies the need for and how to attain balanced occlusion in removable partial denture prosthetics. Prerequisite: An interview with the program head to establish interest, motivation, and aptitudes for dental laboratory technology. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. DNL 175 Dental Laboratory Management (2 cr.) Teaches ethical principles, laws, and organizations which regulate the dental technician and the commercial dental laboratory. Introduces the business fundamentals of operating the dental laboratory. Includes management, marketing, accounting fundamentals, human resources, production, finance, and dental laboratory design. Develops job survival skills. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. An interview with the program head is required in order to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes for dental laboratory activities. Lecture 2 hours per week. DNL 216 Dental Laboratory Practicum (6 cr.) Provides practical laboratory in two specialties of dental laboratory technique. Designed to strengthen the student's skill and knowledge by experience in the utilization of advanced techniques. Gives practical experience in a commercial dental laboratory. Seminars are conducted and the student's laboratory work is evaluated for clinical acceptability during each laboratory session. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. An interview with the program head is required to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes for dental laboratory technology. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 15 hours. Total 16 hours per week. DNL 220 Introduction to Dental Ceramics (6 cr.) Introduces students to ceramic and porcelainfused-to-metal dental restorations. Includes techniques of design and fabrication of metal substructures followed by ceramic firing techniques. Discusses various ceramic alloy and all-ceramic crown techniques. Students observe fabrication procedure demonstrations and receive one-on-one instruction during part of the laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Students must interview with the program head in order to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes in dental lab technology. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 9 hours. Total 12 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS DNL 231 Advanced Dental Laboratory Techniques I (2 cr.) Introduces the theory of advanced dental laboratory techniques and new technological developments that are currently used in dentistry. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Students must interview with the program head to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes for dental lab technology. Lecture 2 hours per week. DNL 240 Comprehensive Review in Dental Laboratory Technology (2 cr.) Provides concentrated review of related subject matter pertaining to the Recognized Graduate Examination (National Certification Examination). Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Students are required to interview with the program head to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes for dental laboratory technology. Lecture 2 hours per week. DNL 298 Seminar and Project in Dental Laboratory (1 cr.) Provides the opportunity for in-depth study and research of an aspect of dental laboratory technology that is of particular interest to the student. A student may fabricate a type of dental appliance, demonstrate a particular technique using a table clinic with visual displays or Power Point presentation. Students must select a topic of interest that must be approved by their Instructor. The project's content must be more comprehensive in scope and depth than all other DNL courses offered in the Dental Lab Technology AAS degree curriculum. Prerequisites: General admission to the college. Students must interview with the program head to determine interest, motivation, and aptitudes for dental lab technology. Lecture 1 hour per week. DNL 298 Seminar and Project in Dental Laboratory (2 cr.) Requires completion of a comprehensive dental technology or dental laboratory business research project related to the student's occupational objective. Students are required to complete a research paper describing a dental laboratory procedure/technique or business model for the operation of a commercial dental laboratory. Students will also complete a table clinic presentation illustrating in detail the laboratory procedure/ technique or business model. The content and scope of the project must be more comprehensive than all other DNL courses offered in the Dental Lab Technology AAS degree curriculum. Lecture 2 hours per week.

DNL 298 Seminar and Project in Dental Laboratory (3 cr.) Provides students an opportunity to participate in lecture and dental laboratory experiences that include the following: basic prosthetic fabrication procedures in complete and partial dentures, fixed prosthetics, orthodontic appliances, and various articulators. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the PreNursing and Allied Health, Dental Laboratory Technology CSC and Dental Laboratory Technology AAS degree program. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

DIESEL DSL 111 Introduction to the Diesel Engine (2 cr.) Studies the modern diesel engine, including its fuel, cooling, induction, and exhaust systems. Covers construction, fabrication, maintenance, tune-up, and minor repair and adjustment. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week. DSL 126 Diesel Engine Reconditioning (6 cr.) Provides basic knowledge of the construction, design, and application of selected modern diesel engines and their components. Covers induction and exhaust systems, cooling and lubricating systems, and fuel injection and governing systems. Provides opportunity to disassemble, inspect, recondition, reassemble, and test selected engines. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 9 hours per week. DSL 131 Diesel Fuel Systems and Tune-Up (4 cr.) Teaches maintenance, adjustment, testing, and general repair of the typical fuel injection components used on non-automotive diesel engines. Includes engine and fuel system tuneup procedures and troubleshooting using current diagnostic equipment. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week. DSL 142 Transportation Electrical Systems II (2 cr.) Studies basic operational theory of electrical systems used in public transportation vehicles. Covers electrical symbols, schematics, troubleshooting procedures, as well as the function, construction, and operation of the electrical system and its components. Prerequisite: Sponsorship by a public transit authority and school approval. Part II of II. Lecture 2 hours per week.

DSL 143 Diesel Truck Electrical Systems (4 cr.) Studies the theory and operation of various truck and tractor electrical systems. Covers starting, charging, lighting, and multiplexing systems. Uses modern equipment for measurement, adjustment and troubleshooting, and electrical and electronic systems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week. DSL 150 Mobile Hydraulics and Pneumatics (3 cr.) Introduces the theory, operation, and maintenance of hydraulic/pneumatic systems and devices used in mobile applications. Emphasizes the properties of fluid, fluid flow, fluid states, and the application of Bernoulli's equation. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. DSL 152 Diesel Power Trains, Chassis, and Suspension (4 cr.) Studies the chassis, suspension, steering, and brake systems found on medium and heavy-duty diesel trucks. Covers construction features, operating principles, and service procedures for such power train components as clutches, multi-speed transmissions, propeller shafts, and rear axles. Teaches operations of modern equipment to correct and adjust abnormalities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Total 6 hours per week. DSL 160 Air Brake Systems (3 cr.) Studies the basic operational theory of pneumatic and air brake systems as used in heavy-duty and public transportation vehicles. Covers various air control valves, test system components, and advanced air system schematics. Teaches proper service and preventative maintenance of system. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. DSL 176 Transportation Air Conditioning (2 cr.) Studies fundamentals of transportation air conditioning. Includes repair, service, and troubleshooting of the refrigeration systems used in road vehicles and heavy equipment. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week. DSL 197 Cooperative Education in Diesel Mechanics Technology (3 cr.) Provides supervised on-the-job training for pay in approved business, industrial, and service firms coordinated by the college. Laboratory 15 hours per week.

DIETETICS DIT 121 Nutrition I (3 cr.) Studies food composition, dietary guidelines, and nutrients essential to healthy human life. Analyzes nutrient function and metabolism. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE DRAFTING DRF 111 Technical Drafting I (3 cr.) Introduces technical drafting from the fundamentals through advanced drafting practices. Teaches lettering, metric construction, technical sketching, orthographic projection, sections, intersections, development, fasteners, theory, and applications of dimensioning and tolerances. Includes pictorial drawing and preparation of working and detailed drawings. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. DRF 165 Architectural Blueprint Reading (3 cr.) Emphasizes reading, understanding, and interpreting standard types of architectural drawing, including plans, elevations, sections, and details. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. DRF 231 Computer-Aided Drafting I (3 cr.) Teaches computer-aided drafting concepts and equipment. Develops a general understanding of components and operating a typical CAD system. DRF 111 is recommended for individuals with no experience in technical drawing prior to enrolling in DRF 231. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. DRF 232 Computer-Aided Drafting II (3 cr.) Teaches advanced operation in computer-aided drafting. Prerequisite: DRF 231. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. DRF 233 Computer-Aided Drafting III (3 cr.) Introduces programming skills and exposes students to geometric modeling. Focuses on proficiency in production drawing using a CAD system. Prerequisite: DRF 232. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. DRF 238 Computer-Aided Modeling and Rendering I (3 cr.) Focuses on training students in the contemporary techniques of 3D modeling, rendering, and animation on the personal computer. Introduces the principles of visualization, sometimes known as photorealism, which enable the student to create presentation drawings for both architectural and industrial product design. Uses computer animation to produce walk-throughs that will bring the third dimension to architectural designs. 3-D Studio is the primary software used in this course. Part I of II. Prerequisite: DRF 232. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

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DRF 239 Computer-Aided Modeling and Rendering II (3 cr.) Focuses on training students in the contemporary techniques of 3D modeling, rendering, and animation on the personal computer. Introduces the principles of visualization, sometimes known as photorealism, which enable the student to create presentation drawings for both architectural and industrial product design. Uses computer animation to produce walk-throughs that will bring the third dimension to architectural designs. Part II of II. Prerequisite: DRF 238. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

ECO 202 Principles of Economics II Microeconomics (3 cr.) Introduces the basic concepts of microeconomics. Explores the free market concepts with coverage of economic models and graphs, scarcity and choices, supply and demand, elasticity's, marginal benefits and cost, profits, and production and distribution. Prerequisites: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3; mathematics placement recommendation at MTE 3 or higher. Lecture 3 hours per week.

DRF 299 Supervised Study in Drafting: Computer-Aided Modeling and Rendering I (3 cr.) Focuses on training students in the contemporary techniques of 3D modeling, rendering, and animation on the personal computer. Introduces the principles of visualization, sometimes known as photorealism, which enable the student to create presentation drawings for both architectural and industrial product design. Uses computer animation to produce walk-throughs that will bring the third dimension to architectural designs. Prerequisite: DRF 232. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

EDU 114 Driver Task Analysis (3 cr.) Introduces the "driver task" as related to the highway transportation system and factors that influence performance ability. Prepares students so they may be eligible to take certification exams for driving school instructors in both public and private schools. Prerequisite: Must be eligible for ENF 1 or ESL 51. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

ECONOMICS ECO 120 Survey of Economics (3 cr.) Presents a broad overview of economic theory, history, development, and application. Introduces terms, definitions, policies, and philosophies of market economies. Provides some comparison with other economic systems. Includes some degree of exposure to microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts. Lecture 3 hours per week. ECO 201 Principles of Economics I Macroeconomics (3 cr.) Introduces macroeconomics, including the study of Keynesian, classical, monetarist principles and theories; the study of national economic growth, inflation, recession, unemployment, financial markets, and money and banking; and the role of government spending and taxation, along with international trade and investments. Prerequisites: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3; mathematics placement recommendation at MTE 3 or higher. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EDUCATION

EDU 195 Topics in Education: Developing Effective Rubrics (1 cr.) Focuses on developing effective general rubrics as a component of quality instruction. Examines various types of rubrics and learning targets. Prerequisite: Must be a licensed and/ or in-service preK-12 teacher or administrator. Lecture 1 hour per week. EDU 195 Topics in Education: Applications of an Instructional Framework (3 cr.) Encourages faculty reflection on their current teaching by considering formative assessment, instructional design, critical thinking, and questioning methods. Fosters confidence and patience for experimenting with instructional design and reflecting on the scholarship of teaching. Prerequisite: Must be a current Reynolds Community College faculty member. Lecture 3 hours per week. EDU 195 Topics in Education: Establishing Effective Classroom Management (1 cr.) Develops effective classroom management strategies with an emphasis on creating a holistic classroom management plan. Examines the role of student engagement on classroom behavior and achievement. Focuses on developing positive teacher-student relationships. Discusses teaching philosophies that facilitate effective classroom management. Lecture 1 hour per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EDU 200 Introduction to Teaching as a Profession (3 cr.) Provides an orientation to the teaching profession in Virginia, including historical perspectives, current issues, and future trends in education on the national and state levels. Emphasizes information about teacher licensure examinations, steps to certification, teacher preparation and induction programs, and attention to critical shortage areas in Virginia. Includes supervised field placement in a K-12 school. Prerequisite: SDV 101 and successful completion of 24 credits of transfer courses. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. EDU 214 Instructional Principles of Driver Education (3 cr.) Analyzes rules and regulations that govern the conduct of driver education programs with special emphasis on organization and administration. Includes uses in the classroom, driving range, and on the street. Prepares students so they may be eligible to take the state certification exam in driver education. Prerequisite: EDU 114. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. EDU 220 Teaching Reading (3 cr.) Provides instruction in concepts and strategies involved in teaching reading at the K-12 levels. Includes topics on literacy, components of development, various reading programs, technology integration, and assessment tools. May include field placement in a K-12 school. Lecture 3 hours per week. EDU 225 Audiovisual Materials and Computer Software (3 cr.) Prepares students to construct graphic teaching aids; to select and develop materials for instructional support; and to operate, maintain, and use audiovisual equipment in the classroom. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. EDU 235 Health, Safety, and Nutrition Education (3 cr.) Focuses on the health and developmental needs of children and the methods by which these needs are met. Emphasizes positive health, hygiene, nutrition and feeding routines, childhood diseases, and safety issues. Emphasizes supporting the mental and physical well-being of children, as well as procedures for reporting child abuse. Prerequisites: Functional literacy in the English language and reading at the 12th grade level or approval of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

EDU 285 Teaching Online Project (TOP) (3 cr.) Instructs educators in the method and practice for delivery of online course content. Includes instructional technology and instructional design theory and practice, with skills and strategies that educators will use to engage students and create a collaborative online environment. Prerequisite: Proficient working knowledge of the current VCCS online course delivery system. Lecture 3 hours per week. EDU 287 Instructional Design for Online Learning (IDOL) (3 cr.) Introduces learners to the fundamentals of creating and organizing online courses according to the ASSURE Model of instructional design and the standards created by Quality Matters. IDOL covers analyzing learners; writing proper learning objectives; ADA compliance; selecting methods, media, and materials to be used within an online course; utilizing those methods, media, and materials; requiring learner participation; evaluating and revising your course; assessing and measuring performance; and a selfreflection. Prerequisites: Basic computer skills, ability to navigate the World Wide Web, experience using Blackboard in teaching for at least one semester, and permission of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week. EDU 289 Learning on the Go (LoGo) (3 cr.) Provides introduction to the fundamentals of implementing mobile technologies in the online teaching and learning environment. Focuses on increasing student engagement using mobile technologies and includes an overview of mobile learning, common applications, researching and applying mobile learning, developing content and materials to be used with mobile devices, assessing in the mobile learning environment, social media, productivity, and a self-reflection. Prerequisites: EDU 287 or equivalent; basic computer skills, including World Wide Web navigation; and experience using Blackboard for a minimum of one semester. Lecture 3 hours per week. EDU 295 Topics in Education: Engaging Online Learners with Web 2.0 Applications (ENROLL 2.0) (3 cr.) Introduces learners to the fundamentals of using various Web 2.0 applications, such as WIMBA, podcasting, and social networking, in order to conduct and manage an online classroom in a manner that promotes student engagement and learning. Prerequisites: EDU 287, basic computer and web navigation skills, and experience using Blackboard for at least one semester for teaching. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EDU 295 Topics in Education: Multimedia for Online Distance and E-learning (MODEL) (3 cr.) Provides students an opportunity to identify, create, and implement multimedia in an elearning course. Covers an introduction to multimedia, the ASSURE model of instructional design, various media formats, screen design and user friendliness, storyboards and storyboard development, multimedia development, assessment creation, and incorporating multimedia into Blackboard. Prerequisites: EDU 287, basic computer skills, familiarity with navigating the World Wide Web, and experience using Blackboard in teaching for a minimum of one semester. Lecture 3 hours per week. EDU 295 Topics in Education: School Law for Teachers (3 cr.) Examines the federal and state laws affecting the duties of teachers in ensuring the rights of students. Investigates the laws which protect teachers from litigation. Discusses the impact of the United States Constitution and landmark cases so that participants may better understand how the law has influenced the American public school. Employs the Code of Virginia as the foundation for state and local policy. Prerequisite: Must be a licensed and/ or in-service PK-12 teacher/administrator or receive approval of the program head. Lecture 3 hours per week. EDU 295 Topics in Education: Teaching Online Project for PreK-12 (TOPPK-12) (3 cr.) Prepares instructors in the pedagogy and course administration of teaching online courses and provides an overview of various technologies available for online instruction. Focuses on the strategies of collaborating and teaching online. This course is intended for PreK-12 teachers and administrators. Prerequisites: Must be a licensed and/or inservice PreK-12 teacher or administrator and have basic computer skills. Lecture 3 hours per week. EDU 295 Topics in Education: Updating Classroom Assessment for Student Growth (3 cr.) Develops effective assessment practices of in-service teachers. Focuses on a balanced assessment approach emphasizing the use of formative and summative assessments. Utilizes quality rubrics as a vital component of effective classroom assessment. Addresses local, state, and federal requirements that impact classroom assessment. Examines the concept that quality assessment is vital to student success. Emphasizes the application of course content to each teacher's individual classroom setting. Prerequisite: Must be a licensed and/or in-service preK-12 teacher or administrator. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES EMS 111 Emergency Medical Technician - Basic (7 cr.) Prepares students for certification as a Virginia and National Registry EMT-Basic. Focuses on all aspects of pre-hospital basic life support as defined by the Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services curriculum for Emergency Medicine Technician Basic. Prerequisite: EMS 100 or equivalent. Co-requisite: EMS 120. Lecture 5 hours. Laboratory 4 hours. Total 9 hours per week. EMS 112 Emergency Medical Technician - Basic I (4 cr.) Prepares students for certification as a Virginia and/or National Registry EMT-Basic. Focuses on all aspects of pre-hospital basic life support as defined by the Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services curriculum for Emergency Medicine Technician Basic. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week. EMS 113 Emergency Medical Technician - Basic II (3 cr.) Continues preparation of students for certification as a Virginia and/or National Registry EMT-Basic. Includes all aspects of prehospital basic life support as defined by the Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services curriculum for Emergency Medical Technician Basic. Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Total 4 hours per week. EMS 120 Emergency Medical Technician Basic Clinical (1 cr.) Observes in a program-approved clinical/ field setting. Includes topics for both EMS 111 and EMS 113, dependent upon the program in which the student is participating and is a Co-requisite for both EMS 111 and EMS 113. Laboratory 2 hours per week. EMS 151 Introduction to Advanced Life Support (4 cr.) Prepares the student for Virginia Enhanced certification eligibility and begins the sequence for National Registry Intermediate and/or Paramedic certification. Includes the theory and application of the following: foundations, human systems, pharmacology, overview of shock, venous access, airway management, patient assessment, respiratory emergencies, allergic reaction, and assessment-based management. Conforms at a minimum to the Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services curriculum. Co-requisite: EMS 170. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

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EMS 153 Basic ECG Recognition (2 cr.) Focuses on the interpretation of basic electrocardiograms (ECG) and their significance. Includes an overview of anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, including structure, function, and electrical conduction in the heart. Covers advanced concepts that build on the knowledge and skills of basic dysrhythmia determination and introduction to 12 lead ECG. Prerequisites: EMS 111 and EMS 120. Co-requisites: EMS 151, EMS 157, and EMS 170. Lecture 2 hours per week. EMS 155 ALS - Medical Care (4 cr.) Continues the Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services Intermediate and/ or Paramedic curricula. Includes ALS pharmacology, drug and fluid administration with emphasis on patient assessment, differential diagnosis, and management of multiple medical complaints. Includes, but not limited to, conditions relating to cardiac, diabetic, neurological, non-traumatic abdominal pain, environmental, behavioral, gynecology, and toxicological disease conditions. Prerequisites: Current EMT-B certification, EMS 151, and EMS 153. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week. EMS 157 ALS - Trauma Care (3 cr.) Continues the Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services Intermediate and/or Paramedic curricula. Utilizes techniques which will allow the student to utilize the assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the trauma patient. Prerequisites: Current EMTB certification and EMS 151. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. EMS 159 ALS-Special Populations (3 cr.) Continues the Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services Intermediate and/or Paramedic curricula. Focuses on the assessment and management of specialty patients, including obstetrical, neonates, pediatric, and geriatrics. Prerequisites: EMS 151 and EMS 153. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: EMS 155. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. EMS 170 ALS Internship I (1 cr.) Begins the first in a series of clinical experiences providing supervised direct patient contact in appropriate patient care facilities in and out of hospitals. Includes, but not limited to, patient care units, such as the Emergency Department, Critical Care units, Pediatric, Labor and Delivery, Operating Room, Trauma Centers, and various advanced life support units. Prerequisites: EMS 151 and EMS 120. Corequisites: EMS 151, EMS 153, and EMS 157. Laboratory 3 hours per week.

EMS 172 ALS Clinical Internship II (1 cr.) Continues with the second in a series of clinical experiences providing supervised direct patient contact in appropriate patient care facilities in and out of hospitals. Includes, but not limited to, patient care units, such as the Emergency Department, Critical Care units, Pediatric, Labor and Delivery, Operating Room, and Trauma Centers. Co-requisite: EMS 151. Laboratory 3 hours per week. EMS 173 ALS Field Internship II (1 cr.) Continues with the second in a series of field experiences providing supervised direct patient care in out-of-hospital advanced life support units. Laboratory 3 hours per week. EMS 201 EMS Professional Development (3 cr.) Prepares students for Paramedic certification at the National Registry Level by fulfilling community activism, personal wellness, resource management, ethical considerations in leadership, and research objectives in the Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services Paramedic curriculum. Lecture 3 hours per week. EMS 205 Advanced Pathophysiology (4 cr.) Focuses on the pathological processes of disease with emphasis on the anatomical and physiological alterations of the human body by systems. Includes diagnosis and management appropriate to the advanced health care provider in and out of the hospital environment. Lecture 4 hours per week. EMS 207 Advanced Patient Assessment (3 cr.) Focuses on the principles of normal and abnormal physical exam. Emphasizes the analysis and interpretation of physiological data to assist in patient assessment and management. Applies principles during the assessment and management of trauma, medical, and specialty patients in laboratory environment. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. EMS 209 Advanced Pharmacology (4 cr.) Focuses on the principles of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug administration. Includes drug legislation, techniques of medication administration, and principles of math calculations. Emphasizes drugs used to manage respiratory, cardiac, neurological, gastrointestinal, fluid and electrolyte, and endocrine disorders and includes classification, mechanism of action, indications, contraindications, precautions, and patient education. Incorporates principles related to substance abuse and hazardous materials. Applies principles during the assessment and management of trauma, medical, and specialty patients in a laboratory environment. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS EMS 211 Operations (2 cr.) Prepares the student in the theory and application of the following: medical incident command, rescue awareness and operations, hazardous materials incidents, and crime scene awareness. (Conforms to the current Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services curriculum for EMT-Paramedics.) Prerequisites: EMS 201, EMS 207, EMS 242, and EMS 243. Co-requisites: EMS 209, EMS 244, and EMS 245. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week.

EGR 110 Engineering Graphics (3 cr.) Presents theories and principles of orthographic projection. Studies multiview, pictorial drawings and sketches, geometric construction, sectioning, lettering, tolerancing, dimensioning, and auxiliary projections. Studies the analysis and graphic presentation of space relationships of fundamental geometric elements: points, lines, planes, and solids. Includes instruction in computer-aided drafting. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

EMS 242 ALS Clinical Internship III (1 cr.) Continues with the third in a series of clinical experiences providing supervised direct patient contact in appropriate patient care facilities in and out of hospitals. Includes, but not limited to, patient care units, such as the Emergency Department, Critical Care units, Pediatric, Labor and Delivery, Operating Room, Trauma Centers, and various advanced life support units. Prerequisites: EMS 155, EMS 159, EMS 172, and EMS 173. Co-requisites: EMS 201, EMS 207, and EMS 243. Laboratory 3 hours per week.

EGR 124 Introduction to Engineering and Engineering Methods (3 cr.) Introduces the engineering profession, professionalism, and ethics. Covers problem presentation, engineering calculations, and digital computer applications; word processing, worksheets, and databases; programming in languages, such as MATLAB, FORTRAN, or C++; elementary numerical methods; and other skills required for computer competency. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: MTH 173. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EMS 243 ALS Field Internship III (1 cr.) Continues with the third in a series of field experiences providing supervised direct patient care in out-of-hospital advanced life support units. Prerequisites: EMS 155, EMS 159, EMS 172, and EMS 173. Co-requisites: EMS 201, EMS 207, and EMS 242. Laboratory 3 hours per week.

EGR 140 Engineering Mechanics - Statics (3 cr.) Introduces mechanics of vector forces and space, scalar mass and time, including S.I. and U.S. customary units. Teaches equilibrium, freebody diagrams, moments, couples, distributed forces, centroids, moments of inertia, analysis of two-force and multi-force members, and friction and internal forces. Prerequisite: MTH 173. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EMS 244 ALS Clinical Internship IV (1 cr.) Continues as the fourth in a series of clinical experiences providing supervised direct patient contact in appropriate patient care facilities in and out of hospitals. Includes, but not limited to, patient care units, such as the Emergency Department, Critical Care units, Pediatric, Labor and Delivery, Operating Room, and Trauma Centers. Prerequisites: EMS 201, EMS 207, EMS 242, and EMS 243. Co-requisites: EMS 209, EMS 211, and EMS 245. Laboratory 3 hours per week.

EGR 206 Engineering Economy (3 cr.) Presents economic analysis of engineering alternatives. Studies economic and cost concepts, calculation of economic equivalence, comparison of alternatives, replacement economy, economic optimization in design and operation, depreciation, and after-tax analysis. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: ENG 111. Lecture 3 hours per week.

EMS 245 ALS Field Internship IV (1 cr.) Continues as the fourth in a series of field experiences, providing supervised direct patient care in out-of-hospital advanced life support units. Prerequisites: EMS 201, EMS 207, EMS 242, and EMS 243. Co-requisites: EMS 209, EMS 211, and EMS 244. Laboratory 3 hours per week.

EGR 245 Engineering Mechanics - Dynamics (3 cr.) Presents approach to kinematics of particles in linear and curvilinear motion. Includes kinematics of rigid bodies in plane motion. Teaches Newton's second law, work-energy and power, impulse and momentum, and problem solving using computers. Prerequisite: EGR 140. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ENGINEERING

EGR 246 Mechanics of Materials (3 cr.) Teaches concepts of stress, strain, deformation, internal equilibrium, and basic properties of engineering materials. Analyzes axial loads, torsion, bending, shear, and combined loading. Studies stress transformation and principle stresses, column analysis, and energy principles. Prerequisite: EGR 140. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

EGR 248 Thermodynamics for Engineers (3 cr.) Studies formulation of the first and second law of thermodynamics. Presents energy conversion, concepts of energy, temperature, entropy, enthalpy, and equations of state of fluids. Covers reversibility and irreversibility in processes, closed and open systems, cyclical processes, and problem solving using computers. Prerequisite: MTH 173. Lecture 3 hours per week. EGR 251 Basic Electric Circuits I (3 cr.) Teaches fundamentals of electric circuits. Includes circuit quantities of charge, current, potential, power, and energy. Teaches resistive circuit analysis; Ohm's and Kirchoff's laws; nodal and mesh analysis; network theorems; and RC, RL, and RLC circuit transient response with constant forcing functions. Teaches AC steady-state analysis, power, and three-phase circuits. Presents frequency domain analysis, resonance, Fourier series, inductively coupled circuits, Laplace transform applications, and circuit transfer functions. Introduces problem solving using computers. Prerequisite: MTH 174 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. EGR 255 Electric Circuits Laboratory (1 cr.) Teaches principles and operation of laboratory instruments such as VOM, electronic voltmeters, digital multimeters, oscilloscopes, counters, wave generators, and power supplies. Presents application to circuit measurements, including transient and steadystate response of simple networks with laboratory applications of laws and theories of circuits plus measurement of AC quantities. Co-requisite: EGR 251. Laboratory 3 hours per week.

ENGLISH ENG 2 Spelling and Vocabulary Study (2 cr.) Helps students to improve spelling and develop vocabulary. Reviews common spelling patterns. Familiarizes the student with basic prefixes, suffixes, root words, and other word formations. Teaches effective use of the dictionary and thesaurus. Stresses recognizing words in reading context and using them effectively in writing. Lecture 2 hours per week. ENG 2 Spelling and Vocabulary Study (3 cr.) Helps students to improve spelling and develop vocabulary. Reviews common spelling patterns. Familiarizes the student with basic prefixes, suffixes, root words, and other word formations. Teaches effective use of the dictionary and thesaurus. Stresses recognizing words in reading context and using them effectively in writing. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ENG 111 College Composition I (3 cr.) Introduces students to critical thinking and the fundamentals of academic writing. Through the writing process, students refine topics; develop and support ideas; investigate, evaluate, and incorporate appropriate resources; edit for effective style and usage; and determine appropriate approaches for a variety of contexts, audiences, and purposes. Writing activities will include exposition and argumentation with at least one researched essay. ENG 111 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: Placement recommendation for ENG 111 or placement recommendation for co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. ENG 111 is a prerequisite for ENG 112. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 112 College Composition II (3 cr.) Continues to develop college writing with increased emphasis on critical essays, argumentation, and research, developing these competencies through the examination of a range of texts about the human experience. Requires students to locate, evaluate, integrate, and document sources and effectively edit for style and usage. ENG 112 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 111 or its equivalent and the ability to use word processing software; a grade of "C" or better in ENG 111 is recommended. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 115 Technical Writing (3 cr.) Develops ability in technical writing through extensive practice in composing technical reports and other documents. Guides students in achieving voice, tone, style, and content appropriate to a specific audience and purpose. Includes instruction in formatting, editing, and graphics. Introduces students to technical discourse through selected reading. Provides instruction and practice in basic principles of oral presentation. Prerequisite: ENG 111 or approval by the English department head. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 137 Communication Processes I (3 cr.) Covers content, form, and procedures for research writings, which may include reports, articles, summaries, essays, and correspondence. Stresses editing, proofreading skills, sentence structure, and paragraph development. Offers instruction and practice in oral communication skills. May use reading selections for discussions and writing assignments. Prerequisite: Departmental placement recommendation. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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ENG 210 Advanced Composition (3 cr.) Helps students refine skills in writing non-fiction prose. Guides students in the development of individual voice and style. Introduces procedures for composing and producing alphabetic, visual, aural, and/ or digital texts and for publication in an electronic environment. ENG 210 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 with a grade of "C" or better or approval by the English department head. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 215 Creative Writing - Fiction I (3 cr.) Introduces, in a workshop setting, the fundamentals and techniques of writing short and long fiction. ENG 215 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 111 or approval by the English department program head. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 217 Creative Writing - Poetry I (3 cr.) Introduces, in a workshop setting, the fundamentals and techniques of writing poetry. ENG 217 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 111 or approval by the English program head. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 233 The Bible as Literature (3 cr.) Provides an introduction to the study of the Bible as literature. Examines the intent and presentation of major literary genres found in the Bible, refining student skills of analysis, synthesis, and presentation. Involves critical reading and writing. ENG 233 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or its equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 241 Survey of American Literature I (3 cr.) Examines American literary works from pre-colonial times through the midnineteenth century, emphasizing the ideas and characteristics of American national literature. Involves critical reading and writing. ENG 241 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or its equivalent. ENG 241 and ENG 242 may be taken out of order. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ENG 242 Survey of American Literature II (3 cr.) Examines American literary works from the late-nineteenth century to the present, emphasizing the ideas and characteristics of the American national literature. Involves critical reading and writing. ENG 242 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or its equivalent. ENG 241 and ENG 242 may be taken out of order. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 243 Survey of English (British) Literature I (3 cr.) Examines major English (British) texts from the Anglo-Saxon period to the 18th century, emphasizing the ideas and characteristics of the British literary tradition. Involves critical reading and writing. ENG 243 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or its equivalent. ENG 243 and ENG 244 may be taken out of order. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 244 Survey of English (British) Literature II (3 cr.) Examines major English (British) texts from the Romantics to the contemporary period, emphasizing the critical ideas and traditions of the English (British) literary tradition. Involves critical reading and writing. ENG 244 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or its equivalent. ENG 243 and ENG 244 may be taken out of order. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 251 Survey of World Literature I (3 cr.) Examines major works of world literature from the ancient period to the early 17th century. Involves critical reading and writing. This course has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or its equivalent. ENG 251 and ENG 252 may be taken out of order. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 252 Survey of World Literature II (3 cr.) Examines major works of world literature from the 17th century to the present era. Involves critical reading and writing. This course has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or equivalent. ENG 251 and ENG 252 may be taken out of order. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ENG 253 Survey of African-American Literature I (3 cr.) Examines selected works by AfricanAmerican writers from the colonial period to the early 20th century. Involves critical reading and writing. ENG 253 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or equivalent. ENG 253 and ENG 254 may be taken out of order. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 254 Survey of African-American Literature II (3 cr.) Examines selected works by AfricanAmerican writers from the Harlem/New Negro Renaissance to the contemporary period. Involves critical reading and writing. ENG 254 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or its equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 273 Women in Literature I (3 cr.) Examines literature by and about women prior to 1900. Involves critical reading and writing. ENG 273 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or its equivalent. ENG 273 and ENG 274 may be taken out of order. Lecture 3 hours per week. ENG 274 Women in Literature II (3 cr.) Examines literature by and about women from 1900 to the present. Involves critical reading and writing. ENG 274 has been designated as a "writing intensive" course according to standards developed by the English department. Prerequisite: ENG 112 or its equivalent. ENG 273 and ENG 274 may be taken out of order. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE ESL 20 English as a Second Language II (9 cr.) Provides intensive instruction and practice at the low intermediate level. Provides an introduction to the sound system, stress, and intonational and rhythmic patterns of English through listening and speaking exercises. Includes individualized instruction to improve basic reading comprehension. Requires practice in writing with emphasis on building basic sentence structures, grammar, and sentence-level writing. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Lecture 9 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ESL 31 Composition I (6 cr.) Provides instruction and practice in the writing process, emphasizing development of fluency in writing and competence in structural and grammatical patterns of written English. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Recommendation of department following satisfactory completion of ESL 20 or appropriate placement test. Lecture 6 hours per week. ESL 32 Reading I (6 cr.) Helps students improve their reading comprehension and vocabulary development. Improves students' reading proficiency to a level which would allow the students to function adequately in ESL 42. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Recommendation of department following satisfactory completion of ESL 20 or appropriate placement test. Lecture 6 hours per week. ESL 33 Oral Communications I (6 cr.) Helps students practice and improve listening and speaking skills as needed for functioning successfully in academic, professional, and personal settings. Assesses students' oral skills and includes, as needed, practice with pronunciation, rhythm, stress, and intonation. Provides exercises, practices, small and large group activities, and oral presentations to help students overcome problems in oral communication. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Recommendation of department following satisfactory completion of ESL 20, and completion of or co-enrollment in ESL 31 and ESL 32 is recommended. Lecture 6 hours per week. ESL 35 ESL Applied Grammar 3 (3 cr.) Provides instruction and practice in the use of intermediate-level academic English grammar structures, including verb tenses, parts of speech, and basic sentence structure. Helps ESL students assess their own knowledge of English grammar, improve accuracy, and learn methods to improve editing. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ESL 31 or approval by the ESL program coordinator. Lecture 3 hours per week. ESL 41 Composition II (6 cr.) Provides further instruction and practice in the writing process and introduces advanced language patterns. Includes practice in developing and improving writing strategies. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Recommendation of department following satisfactory completion of intermediate ESL 31 or appropriate placement test. Lecture 6 hours per week.

ESL 42 Reading II (6 cr.) Helps students improve their reading comprehension and vocabulary. Improves students' reading proficiency to a level which would allow the students to function adequately in ESL 52 and some academic college classes. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Recommendation of department following satisfactory completion of ESL 32 or appropriate placement test. Lecture 6 hours per week. ESL 43 Oral Communications II (6 cr.) Provides further instruction and practice in helping students to improve listening and speaking skills. Assesses students' oral skills and includes, as needed, practice with pronunciation, rhythm, stress, and intonation. Emphasizes the development of fluency through exercises, practices, small and large group activities, and formal and informal presentations. Provides practice in note-taking. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ESL 33, ESL 41, and ESL 42 or department consent. Lecture 6 hours per week. ESL 45 Applied Grammar 4 (3 cr.) Provides instruction and practice in the use of high intermediate and advanced academic English grammar structures, including advanced verb forms, clauses, determiners, and prepositions. Helps ESL students assess their own knowledge of English grammar, improve accuracy, and learn methods to improve editing. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: ESL 41 or approval by the ESL program coordinator. Lecture 3 hours per week. ESL 51 Composition III (6 cr.) Prepares for college-level writing by practice in the writing process with emphasis on development of thought in essays of greater length and complexity and use of appropriate syntax and diction. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Recommendation of department following satisfactory completion of ESL 41 or appropriate placement test and completion of ESL 32. Prerequisite or Co-requisite (recommended): ESL 42. Lecture 6 hours per week. ESL 52 Reading III (6 cr.) Emphasizes applying and synthesizing ideas. Includes ways to detect organization, summarize, make inferences, draw conclusions, evaluate generalizations, recognize differences between facts and opinions, and introduces other advanced comprehension strategies. May also include comprehensive library skills. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ESL 41 and 42 or appropriate placement test. Lecture 6 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ESL 58 ESL Writing Workshop II (6 cr.) Provides an intensive writing seminar for students struggling with the writing process, editing, and self-correction in academic English. Helps students improve their fluency and command of American academic English. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: ESL 51. Prerequisite or Corequisite: ESL 52. Lecture 6 hours per week. ESL 72 Spelling and Vocabulary (3 cr.) Provides individualized instruction and practice in sound-letter correspondences. Introduces students to basic spelling rules, word division, prefixes, roots, and suffixes. Helps students master vocabulary through an understanding of homonyms, confusing words, and Greek and Latin roots. Stresses using words in context. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisites: Completion of ESL 20 or placement at the intermediate level (ESL 31, 32, 33). Lecture 3 hours per week. ESL 73 Accent Reduction (3 cr.) Provides contextualized practice at the high intermediate/advanced level to improve the speech intelligibility of non-native speakers of English. Focuses on problems of American English pronunciation, unclear individual sounds, positional variants, stress, and rhythm and intonation common to speakers of different language backgrounds. May include individualized practice in consonant and vowel production. Credits are not applicable toward graduation. Prerequisite: Recommendation following oral placement interview or successful completion of ESL 33. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ENGLISH FUNDAMENTALS ENF 1 Preparing for College English I (8 cr.) Provides integrated reading and writing instruction for students who require extensive preparation to succeed in college-level English courses. Students will place into this course based on placement test score. Upon successful completion and faculty recommendation, students will move into Preparing for College English III (if they require additional preparation) or into collegelevel English (if they require no additional preparation). Credit is not applicable toward graduation. Lecture 8 hours per week.

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ENF 2 Preparing for College English II (4 cr.) Provides integrated reading and writing instruction for students who require intermediate preparation to succeed in college-level English courses. Students will place into this course based on placement test score. Upon successful completion and faculty recommendation, students will move into Preparing for College Level III (if they require additional preparation) or into collegelevel English (if they require no additional preparation). Credit is not applicable toward graduation. Lecture 4 hours per week.

FIN 215 Financial Management (3 cr.) Introduces basic financial management topics, including statement analysis, working capital, capital budgeting, and long-term financing. Focuses on Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return techniques, lease vs. buy analysis, and Cost of Capital computations. Uses problems and cases to enhance skills in financial planning and decision making. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ENF 3 Preparing for College English III (2 cr.) Provides integrated reading and writing instruction for students who require minimal preparation for college-level English, but still need some preparation to succeed. Students in this course will be co-enrolled in college-level English. Students will place into this course based on placement test score. Credit is not applicable toward graduation. Lecture 4 hours per week.

FST 100 Principles of Emergency Services (3 cr.) Provides an overview to fire protection; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; philosophy and history of fire protection/service, fire loss analysis, organization and function to public and private fire protection services, fire departments as part of local government, laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics, introduction to fire protection systems, and introduction to fire strategy and tactics. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in the fall semester)

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE ENV 195 Topics in Environmental Science: The Environment and Its Chemistry (4 cr.) Introduces chemical principles and applies them to environmental issues. Covers the fundamental principles, concepts, and language of general, organic, inorganic, and biochemistry. Addresses topics associated with matter/energy, nuclear chemistry, air and water quality, and wastes. Laboratories will include sampling, analysis, and generation of statistically-valid data while preparing students to think like environmental scientists. Environmental Sustainability Designation: Course content related to the study of sustainable development. Prerequisite: MTE 4 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

FINANCIAL SERVICES FIN 107 Personal Finance (3 cr.) Presents a framework of personal money management concepts, including establishing values and goals, determining sources of income, managing income, preparing a budget, developing consumer buying ability, using credit, understanding savings and insurance, providing for adequate retirement, and estate planning. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

FST 105 Fire Suppression Operations (3 cr.) Introduces the fundamentals of fire suppression. Explores fire behavior and basic physical and chemical laws of fire dynamics. Prepares student to understand the need for quick operational decisions made on the fire ground, including emergency management. Lecture 3 hours per week. FST 110 Fire Behavior and Combustion (3 cr.) Explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and how they are controlled. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in the fall semester) FST 112 Hazardous Materials Chemistry (3 cr.) Provides basic fire chemistry relating to the categories of hazardous materials, including problems of recognition, reactivity, and health encountered by firefighters. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in the spring semester) FST 115 Fire Prevention (3 cr.) Provides fundamental information regarding the history and philosophy of fire prevention; organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau; use of fire codes; identification and correction of fire hazards; and the relationships of fire prevention with built-in fire protection systems, fire investigation, and fire and lifesafety education. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in the spring semester)

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FST 121 Principles of Fire and Emergency Services Safety and Survival (3 cr.) Introduces basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavior change throughout the emergency services. Lecture 3 hours per week. (This course has replaced FST 120 in the curriculum.) FST 135 Fire Instructor I (3 cr.) Emphasizes development of teaching methods and aids, including role-playing, small group discussion, and development of individual learning methods and materials. Requires students to develop lesson plans and make presentations on appropriate topics. Prepares students for certification as Fire Instructor I. (Course is based on current requirements of NFPA 1041, Standards for Fire Instructor Professional Qualifications.) Lecture 3 hours per week. FST 140 Fire Officer I (4 cr.) Presents a basic course to help individuals develop the skills needed to supervise and direct personnel and manage resources at the company level, and is based on the current requirements of the NFPA 1021, Standards for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications. Prepares the student for certification as Fire Officer I. Lecture 4 hours per week. FST 205 Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply (3 cr.) Provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and to apply hydraulic principles to analyze and solve water supply problems. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in the spring semester)

FST 217 Automatic Sprinkler System Design II (3 cr.) Continues the study of automatic sprinkler system design, implementation, and installation. Includes the use of appropriate computer applications in the design of various types of sprinkler systems. Prerequisite: FST 216. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in spring semester) FST 220 Building Construction for Fire Protection (3 cr.) Provides the components of building construction that relate to fire and life safety. The focus of this course is on firefighter safety. Covers the construction and design of structures and how they are key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in the fall semester) FST 230 Fire Investigation (3 cr.) Provides the student with the fundamentals and technical knowledge needed for proper fire scene interpretations, including recognizing and conducting origin and cause, preservation of evidence and documentation, scene security, motives of the firesetter, and types of fire causes. Lecture 3 hours per week. FST 235 Strategy and Tactics (3 cr.) Provides an in-depth analysis of the principles of fire control through utilization of personnel, equipment, and extinguishing agents on the fire ground. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in the fall semester)

FST 210 Legal Aspects of Fire Service (3 cr.) Introduces the Federal, State, and local laws that regulate emergency services; national standards influencing emergency services; and standards of care, tort, and liability, and a review of relevant court cases. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in the spring semester)

FST 237 Emergency Services Supervision (3 cr.) Teaches the history of modern management theories, including scientific management and behavioral scientist approach. Introduces concepts of group dynamics, leadership, communication, stress and time management, and personnel evaluation techniques. Discusses the legal and ethical considerations of personnel management in the emergency service. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FST 215 Fire Protection Systems (3 cr.) Provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire detection and alarm systems, heat and smoke control systems, special protection and sprinkler systems, water supply for fire protection, and portable fire extinguishers. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in the spring semester)

FST 240 Fire Administration (3 cr.) Introduces the student to the organization and management of a fire department and the relationship of government agencies to the fire service. Emphasizes fire service leadership from the perspective of the company officer. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in the fall semester)

FST 216 Automatic Sprinkler System Design I (3 cr.) Presents a comprehensive study of treatment of automatic sprinkler systems, including a study of sprinkler standards, design features, water supply adequacy, sprinkler limitations, and appropriate building and fire code applications. Prerequisite: FST 205 or program permission. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

FST 245 Fire and Risk Analysis (3 cr.) Presents a study of current urban fire problems with emphasis on solutions based upon current available technology. Includes master planning, as well as methods of identifying, analyzing, and measuring accompanying risk and loss possibilities. Prerequisite: FST 240 or permission of program head. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Usually offered in the spring semester) FST 250 Fire Officer II (3 cr.) Presents an intermediate-level course to help individuals further develop the skills needed to supervise and direct personnel, manage resources at the company level, and is based on the current requirements of the NFPA 1021, Standards for Fire Officer Professional Qualifications. Prepares student for certification as Fire Officer II. Prerequisite: FST 140 or Certification as Fire Officer I. Lecture 3 hours per week.

FRENCH FRE 101 Beginning French I (4 cr.) Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic French sentence structure. Incorporates exposure to the arts, culture, and literature of the areas of the world where French is spoken. Part I of II. Lecture 4 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week. FRE 102 Beginning French II (4 cr.) Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic French sentence structure. Incorporates exposure to the arts, culture, and literature of the areas of the world where French is spoken. Part II of II. Prerequisite: FRE 101 or equivalent. Lecture 4 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week. FRE 201 Intermediate French I (3 cr.) Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. French is used in the classroom. Part I of II. Prerequisite: FRE 102 or equivalent. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week. Lecture 3 hours per week. FRE 201 Intermediate French I (4 cr.) Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. French is used in the classroom. Part I of II. Prerequisite: FRE 102 or equivalent. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week. Lecture 4 hours per week. FRE 202 Intermediate French II (3 cr.) Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. French is used in the classroom. Part II of II. Prerequisite: FRE 201 or equivalent. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE FRE 202 Intermediate French II (4 cr.) Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. French is used in the classroom. Part II of II. Prerequisite: FRE 201 or equivalent. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week. Lecture 4 hours per week.

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS GIS 200 Geographical Information Systems I (3 cr.) Provides hands-on introduction to a dynamic desktop GIS (Geographic Information System). Introduces the components of a desktop GIS and their functionality. Emphasizes manipulation of data for the purpose of analysis, presentation, and decision-making. Prerequisite: ITE 115 or equivalent. Lecture 2 hours per week. Laboratory 2 hours per week. Total 4 hours per week. GIS 201 Geographical Information Systems II (3 cr.) Provides a continuation of GIS 200, with emphasis on advanced topics in problemsolving, decision-making, modeling, programming, and data management. Covers map projections and data formats, and methods for solving the problems they create. Prerequisite: GIS 200. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

GEOGRAPHY GEO 200 Introduction to Physical Geography (3 cr.) Studies major elements of the natural environment, including earth-sun relationship, land forms, weather and climate, and natural vegetation and soils. Introduces the student to types and uses of maps. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. GEO 210 People and the Land: Introduction to Cultural Geography (3 cr.) Focuses on the relationship between culture and geography. Presents a survey of modern demographics, landscape modification, material and non-material culture, language, race and ethnicity, religion, politics, and economic activities. Introduces the student to types and uses of maps. Prerequisites: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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GEO 220 World Regional Geography (3 cr.) Studies physical and cultural characteristics of selected geographical regions of the world. Focuses upon significant problems within each of the regions and examines the geographical background of those problems. Introduces the student to types and uses of maps. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. GEO 225 Economic Geography (3 cr.) Familiarizes the student with the various economic, geographic, political, and demographic factors that affect international target markets and trade activity. Prerequisites: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

GEOLOGY GOL 105 Physical Geology (4 cr.) Introduces the composition and structure of the earth and modifying agents and processes. Investigates the formation of minerals and rocks, weathering, erosion, earthquakes, and crystal deformation. This course completes a one-year laboratory science requirement when followed by GOL 106. Prerequisite: Completion of ENF 2, if required by placement test, or instructor/advisor approval. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week. GOL 106 Historical Geology (4 cr.) Traces the evolution of the earth and life through time. Presents scientific theories of the origin of the earth and life and interprets rock and fossil record. Prerequisite: GOL 105 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 6 hours per week.

GERMAN GER 101 Beginning German I (4 cr.) Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic German sentence structures. Incorporates exposure to the arts, culture, and literature of the areas of the world where German is spoken. Part I of II. Lecture 4 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week. GER 101 Beginning German I (5 cr.) Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic German sentence structures. Part I of II. Lecture 5 hours per week. May include one additional hour oral practice per week.

GER 102 Beginning German II (4 cr.) Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic German sentence structures. Incorporates exposure to the arts, culture, and literature of the areas of the world where German is spoken. Part II of II. Prerequisite: GER 101. Lecture 4 hours per week. May include one additional hour of oral practice per week. GER 102 Beginning German II (5 cr.) Introduces understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills and emphasizes basic German sentence structures. Part II of II. Prerequisite: GER 101. Lecture 5 hours per week. May include one additional hour oral practice per week. GER 201 Intermediate German I (3 cr.) Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. German is used in the classroom. Prerequisite: GER 102 or equivalent. Part I of II. Lecture 3 hours per week. May include one additional hour oral practice per week. GER 202 Intermediate German II (3 cr.) Continues to develop understanding, speaking, reading, and writing skills. German is used in the classroom. Prerequisite: GER 201 or equivalent. Part II of II. Lecture 3 hours per week. May include one additional hour oral practice per week.

HEALTH HLT 100 First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (2 cr.) Focuses on the principles and techniques of safety, first aid, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Lecture 2 hours per week. HLT 105 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (1 cr.) Provides training in coordinated mouthto-mouth artificial ventilation and chest compression, choking, life-threatening emergencies, sudden illness, and AED skills for adults, children, and infants. Equivalent to EMS 100. Lecture 1 hour per week. HLT 106 First Aid and Safety (2 cr.) Focuses on the principles and techniques of safety and first aid. Lecture 2 hours per week. HLT 110 Concepts of Personal and Community Health (3 cr.) Studies the concepts related to the maintenance of health, safety, and the prevention of illness at the personal and community level. Lecture 3 hours per week. HLT 115 Introduction to Personal and Community Health (1 cr.) Introduces and focuses on the principles of personal and community health. Lecture 1 hour per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HLT 116 Introduction to Personal Wellness Concepts (3 cr.) Explores the relationship between personal health and physical fitness as they apply to individuals in today's society. Includes nutrition, weight control, stress, conditioning, and drugs. Lecture 3 hours per week. HLT 119 First Responder (3 cr.) Provides knowledge and proficiency in basic life support and in actions necessary to minimize patient discomfort and prevention of further complications. Meets requirements for Virginia certification as a first responder. Equivalent to EMS 101. Prerequisite: CPR certification at the health care provider level. Lecture 3 hours per week. HLT 121 Introduction to Drug Use and Abuse (3 cr.) Explores the use and abuse of drugs in contemporary society with emphasis upon sociological, physiological, and psychological effects of drugs. Lecture 3 hours per week. HLT 143 Medical Terminology I (3 cr.) Provides an understanding of medical abbreviations and terms. Includes the study of prefixes, suffixes, word stems, and technical terms with emphasis on proper spelling, pronunciation, and usage. Emphasizes more complex skills and techniques in understanding medical terminology. Lecture 3 hours per week. HLT 195 Topics in Health: Ethics for Health Care Personnel (1 cr.) Focuses on ethical concepts of health care. Emphasizes confidentiality; maintaining patient records; personal appearance; professionalism with patients, clients, and associates; and an awareness of health care facilities. Lecture 1 hour per week. HLT 200 Human Sexuality (3 cr.) Provides a basic understanding of human sexuality. Includes anatomy, physiology, pregnancy, family planning, venereal diseases, and sexual variations. Lecture 3 hours per week. HLT 203 Men's Health (3 cr.) Provides an overview of the male anatomy and examines health status from birth to death from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include major, chronic, and infectious diseases; mental health, andropause, stress, sleep, aging, exercise, nutrition, sexual health, and grooming; and the impact of a male role model on health. Total 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

HLT 204 Women's Health (3 cr.) Explores current issues related to women's health and wellness with an emphasis upon prevention of disease and optimum well-being. Takes a multi-ethnic approach to exploring the most up-to-date findings, diagnostic tools, and treatments for breast cancer, reproductive tract illness, heart disease, and other common diseases faced by women from puberty through menopause. Lecture 3 hours per week. HLT 215 Personal Stress and Stress Management (3 cr.) Provides a basic understanding of stress and its physical, psychological, and social effects. Includes the relationships between stress and change, self-evaluation, sources of stress, and current coping skills for handling stress. Lecture 3 hours per week. HLT 226 AIDS Awareness (2 cr.) Provides basic understanding of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), AIDS-Related Complex (ARC), and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection. Includes information on the etiology of AIDS, historical perspectives, signs and symptoms, HIV antibody testing, safer sex guidelines, AIDS in the workplace (including health care settings), psychosocial issues, death and dying issues, homophobia, and HIV transmission and prevention. Lecture 2 hours per week. HLT 230 Principles of Nutrition and Human Development (3 cr.) Teaches the relationship between nutrition and human development. Emphasizes nutrients, balanced diet, weight control, and the nutritional needs of an individual. Lecture 3 hours per week. HLT 250 General Pharmacology (3 cr.) Emphasizes general pharmacology for the health-related professions, covering general principles of drug actions/reactions, major drug classes, specific agents within each class, and routine mathematical calculations needed to determine desired dosages. Lecture 3 hours per week. HLT 261 Basic Pharmacy I (3 cr.) Explores the basics of general pharmacy, reading prescriptions, symbols, packages, and pharmacy calculations. Teaches measuring compounds of drugs, dosage forms, drug laws, and drug classifications. Part I of II. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: HLT 250. Lecture 3 hours per week. HLT 262 Basic Pharmacy II (3 cr.) Explores the basics of general pharmacy, reading prescriptions, symbols, packages, and pharmacy calculations. Teaches measuring compounds of drugs, dosage forms, drug laws, and drug classifications. Part II of II. Prerequisites: HLT 250 and HLT 261. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HEALTH CARE TECHNICIAN HCT 101 Health Care Technician I (Nurse Aide I) (3 cr.) Teaches basic care skills with emphasis on physical, social, and emotional needs of patients. Covers procedures, communications, and interpersonal relations; observation, charting, and reporting; care planning, safety, and infection control; anatomy and physiology, nutrition and patient feeding; and ethics, death, and dying. Prepares multi-skilled health care workers to care for patients of various ages with special emphasis on geriatric nursing, home health, and long- and shortterm care facilities. Prerequisites: Competency in MTE 1 or higher as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by completing MTE 1; competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of ENF 2; ability to meet physical expectations of patient care; mandatory criminal background check and drug test; current (through the end of class) proof of negative TB; physical ability to lift and move clients, hear audible alarms and sounds, auscultate certain physical parameters, such as blood pressure and breathing; and ability to interact effectively with clients/families and health care team members. Co-requisite: HCT 102. Lecture 3 hours per week. HCT 102 Health Care Technician II (Nurse Aide II) (4 cr.) Applies theory through laboratory experience for health care technicians to work in home health, and long- and short-term facilities. Prerequisites: Competency in MTE 1 or higher as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by completing MTE 1; competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of ENF 2; ability to meet physical expectations of patient care; mandatory criminal background check and drug test; current (through the end of class) proof of negative TB; physical ability to lift and move clients, hear audible alarms and sounds, auscultate certain physical parameters, such as blood pressure and heart and lung sounds; and ability to interact effectively with clients/ families and health care team members. Corequisite: HCT 101. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 7 hours per week. HCT 110 Therapeutic Communication in the Health Care Setting (3 cr.) Develops therapeutic relationship, communication and culture, problem-solving electronic communication, techniques in therapeutic communication, and blocks to therapeutic communication. Addresses assertiveness, anger, and managing team conflict. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT HIM 110 Introduction to Human Pathology (3 cr.) Introduces the basic concepts, terminology, etiology, and characteristics of pathological processes. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: HLT 143 and BIO 100. Co-requisite: HIM 260. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIM 130 Health Information Systems (3 cr.) Teaches basic concepts of microcomputer software (to include operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, and database applications). Focuses on microcomputer applications and information systems in the health care environment. Provides a working introduction to electronic health information systems for allied health, teaching students how the adoption of electronic health records affects them as future health care professionals. Prerequisite: ITE 115. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIM 141 Fundamentals of Health Information Systems I (3 cr.) Focuses on health data collection, storage, retrieval, and reporting systems, with emphasis on the role of the computer in accomplishing these functions. Prerequisite: Passing score on the computer competency exam, ITE 115, or permission of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIM 142 Fundamentals of Health Information Systems II (3 cr.) Focuses on health data collection, storage, retrieval, and reporting systems, with emphasis on the role of the computer in accomplishing these functions. Part II of II. Prerequisite: Passing score on the computer competency exam, ITE 115, or permission of the instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIM 151 Reimbursement Issues in Medical Practice Management (2 cr.) Introduces major reimbursement systems in the United States. Focuses on prospective payments systems, managed care, and documentation necessary for appropriate reimbursement. Emphasizes management of practice to avoid fraud. Prerequisite or Corequisite: HIM 255. Lecture 2 hours per week. HIM 195 Topics in Health Information Management: Chart Retrieval Services (1 cr.) Provides an opportunity for students to explore chart retrieval services through a comprehensive project. Prerequisites: SDV 100, ITE 115 or CSC 155, HLT 143, and HLT 195. Corequisites: HIM 141, HIM 130, HIM 226, and HLT 195-- Ethics for Health Care Personnel. Lecture 1 hour per week.

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HIM 220 Health Statistics (3 cr.) Introduces the student to basic statistical principles and calculations as applied in the health care environment, procedures for collection and reporting vital statistics, and basic quality control basics. Covers the fundamentals of standard deviation, normal distribution, and histograms. Prerequisites: Admittance into the Advanced Medical Coder Career Studies Certificate and placement recommendation for MTH 146 and Algebra I, or equivalent. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: ITE 140. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIM 226 Legal Aspects of Health Record Documentation (2 cr.) Presents the legal requirements associated with health record documentation. Emphasizes the policies and procedures concerning the protection of the confidentiality of patient's health records. Lecture 2 hours per week. HIM 229 Performance Improvement in Healthcare Settings (2 cr.) Focuses on concepts of facility-wide performance improvement, resource management, and risk management. Applies tools for data collection and analysis. Prerequisite: Admittance into the Advanced Medical Coder Career Studies Certificate. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week. HIM 249 Supervision and Management Practices (3 cr.) Introduces supervision and management principles with emphasis on the application of these principles in the health information setting. Prerequisite: Admittance into the Advanced Medical Coder Career Studies program. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: HIM 229, HIM 295, HIM 220, and ITE 140. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIM 250 Health Classification Systems I ICD-9/10-CM (4 cr.) Focuses on disease and procedure classification using ICD-9/10-CM. This system is currently utilized for collecting health data for the purposes of statistical research and financial reporting. Prerequisites: HLT 143 and BIO 100 or BIO 141. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: BIO 142, if student has taken BIO 141. Co-requisites: HIM 110 and HIM 260 (recommended). Lecture 4 hours per week. HIM 255 Health Data Classification Systems II: CPT (2 cr.) Focuses on procedure classification using CPT. This system is currently utilized for collecting health data for the purposes of statistical research and financial reporting. Prerequisites: BIO 100 (or BIO 141 and 142), HLT 143, or permission of the instructor. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: HIM 110. Co-requisite: HIM 260 (recommended). Lecture 2 hours per week.

HIM 256 Clinical Classification Systems and Reimbursement Methodologies (5 cr.) Integrates and applies knowledge with hands-on skill practice in coding. Reinforces reimbursement for CPT coding system, guidelines for out-patient/ambulatory surgery coding, and prospective payment systems and their integration with ICD coding. Promotes critical thinking related to coding quality, fraud, and abuse. Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 141 and 142, HIM 110, HIM 141, HIM 250, HIM 260, and HLT 143. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: HIM 255. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 6 hours. Total 8 hours per week. HIM 260 Pharmacology for Health Information Technology (2 cr.) Emphasizes general pharmacology for health information professionals; covers general principles of drug actions/reactions, major drug classes, specific agents within each class, and routine mathematical calculation needed to determine desired dosages. Prerequisites: HLT 143 and BIO 100 (or BIO 141 and 142), or permission of the instructor. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: HIM 110 and HIM 250. Lecture 2 hours per week. HIM 295 Topics in Alternate Healthcare Settings Coding and Reimbursement (5 cr.) Focuses on disease and procedure coding using International Classification Disease (ICD) and Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) in alternate healthcare settings, such as behavioral health, home health, skilled nursing facilities, long-term care hospitals (LTCH), rehab facilities, and hospice. Prerequisite: Admittance into the Advanced Medical Coder Career Studies Certificate. Lecture 5 hours per week.

HISTORY HIS 101 History of Western Civilization I (3 cr.) Examines the development of western civilization from ancient times to the present. Begins with ancient times and ends with the seventeenth century. HIS 101 and HIS 102 need not be taken in sequence. Part I of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIS 102 History of Western Civilization II (3 cr.) Examines the development of western civilization from ancient times to the present. Begins with the mid-seventeenth century and continues through modern times. HIS 101 and HIS 102 need not be taken in sequence. Part II of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HIS 111 History of World Civilization I (3 cr.) Surveys Asian, African, Latin American, and European civilizations from the ancient period to the present. HIS 111 and HIS 112 need not be taken in sequence. Part I of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 253 History of Asian Civilizations I (3 cr.) Surveys the civilizations of Asia (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam) from prehistory to the sixteenth century. Part I of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 112 History of World Civilization II (3 cr.) Surveys Asian, African, Latin American, and European civilizations from the ancient period to the present. HIS 111 and HIS 112 need not be taken in sequence. Part II of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 254 History of Asian Civilizations II (3 cr.) Surveys the civilizations of Asia (China, Japan, Korea, India, and Southeast Asia - Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam) from the sixteenth century to the present. Part II of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 121 United States History I (3 cr.) Surveys the United States history from its beginning to the present. HIS 121 and HIS 122 need not be taken in sequence. Part I of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 267 The Second World War (3 cr.) Examines causes and consequences of the Second World War. Includes the rise of totalitarianism, American neutrality, military developments, the home fronts, diplomacy, and the decision to use the atomic bomb. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HIS 122 United States History II (3 cr.) Surveys the United States history from its beginning to the present. HIS 121 and HIS 122 need not be taken in sequence. Part II of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIS 127 Women in American History (3 cr.) Studies the role of women and attitudes toward women in American society from colonial times to the present. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIS 141 African-American History I (3 cr.) Surveys the history of black Americans from their African origins to the present. HIS 141 and HIS 142 need not be taken in order. Part I of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIS 142 African-American History II (3 cr.) Surveys the history of black Americans from their African origins to the present. HIS 141 and HIS 142 need not be taken in order. Part II of II. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIS 203 History of African Civilization (3 cr.) Examines major social, economic, political, and religious developments from earliest times to the present. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

HIS 269 Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.) Studies factors that led to the division between the States. Examines the war, the home fronts, and the era of Reconstruction. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIS 276 United States History Since World War II (3 cr.) Investigates United States history from 1945 to the present, studying both domestic developments and American involvement in international affairs. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIS 281 History of Virginia I (3 cr.) Examines the cultural, political, and economic history of the Commonwealth from its beginning to the present. Part I of II. HIS 281 and 282 do not have to be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. HIS 282 History of Virginia II (3 cr.) Examines the cultural, political, and economic history of the Commonwealth from its beginning to the present. Part II of II. HIS 281 and 282 do not have to be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in Co-requisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HORTICULTURE

HRT 106 Practical Horticulture (1 cr.) Provides practical experience in landscape construction equipment operations and maintenance. Laboratory 2 hours per week. HRT 110 Principles of Horticulture (3 cr.) Introduces concepts of plant growth and development. Covers horticultural practices, crops, and environmental factors affecting plant growth. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRT 115 Plant Propagation (3 cr.) Teaches principles and practices of plant propagation. Examines commercial and home practices. Provides experience in techniques using seed-spores, cuttings, grafting, budding, layering, and division. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 119 Irrigation Systems for Turf and Ornamentals (3 cr.) Explains why, when, and how irrigation systems are used by the grounds management industry. Includes component selection, system design, installation, operation, and maintenance. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 120 History of Garden Design (3 cr.) Studies the development of gardens as they chronicle the development of civilization. Introduces the periods, in both Europe and North America, beginning with settlement and on through industrial development and land and space utilization to current environmental concerns. Explores physical and cultural influences on garden design and utilization. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRT 121 Greenhouse Crop Production I (3 cr.) Examines commercial practices related to production of floriculture crops. Considers production requirements, environmental control and management, and cultural techniques affecting production of seasonal crops. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 122 Greenhouse Crop Production II (3 cr.) Continues commercial practices related to production of floriculture crops. Considers production requirements, environmental control and management, and cultural techniques. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 125 Chemicals in Horticulture (3 cr.) Emphasizes basic chemical principles and their application to horticulture. Introduces principles of inorganic and organic chemicals. Studies chemical activities of insecticides, fungicides, herbicides, fertilizers, and growth regulators. Provides students an opportunity to test for their Commercial Pesticide Applicators License, administered by VDACS, at the end of the course. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE HRT 126 Home Landscaping (3 cr.) Studies current approaches to improving home landscapes. Emphasizes planning, proper implementation, and landscape maintenance. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRT 127 Horticultural Botany (3 cr.) Studies taxonomy, anatomy, morphology, physiology, and genetics of plants as applied to identification, propagation, and culture. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 130 Introduction to Biointensive Minifarming (3 cr.) Familiarizes students, through lecture and demonstration, with small-scale food production by gardening. Covers the basics of composting and organic vegetable gardening using biointensive methods. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRT 134 Four Season Food Production (3 cr.) Familiarizes students with organic smallscale food production through lecture and demonstration. Includes seed saving, cover crops, and gardening planning. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HRT 195 Topics in Horticulture: Projects for the Home and Garden (3 cr.) Provides students an opportunity to apply basic knowledge of house and garden projects. Includes the selection and correct use of tools and equipment and practical hands-on installation instruction using the campus site as project models. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRT 195 Topics in Horticulture: Tree and Shrub Propagation (2 cr.) Introduces propagation methods of select trees and shrubs. Examines sexual and asexual methods and the environmental requirements for each. Lecture 2 hours per week. HRT 195 Topics in Horticulture: Tree and Shrub Pruning (1 cr.) Introduces the proper methods of pruning for trees and shrubs. Examines proper tool selection, safety, sanitation, and timing of pruning. Lecture 1 hour per week.

HRT 150 Theory of Landscape Design (3 cr.) Presents the theoretical aspects of landscape planning and design. Uses theory to analyze and solve design problems. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HRT 199 Training for Commercial Pesticide Application (3 cr.) Introduces students to the principles and practices for safe pesticide usage as required by law in the state of Virginia. Students will participate in hands-on calibration exercises; take home label exercises; calibration math exercises; classroom lecture and discussion; and two tests. This course is usually taught as a Dynamic Course, meeting for 7 hours once a week for 7 weeks. Lecture 3 hours.

HRT 190 Coordinated Internship in Horticulture (1 cr.) Provides supervised on-the-job training in selected business, industrial, or service firms in the horticulture industry coordinated by the college. Laboratory 5 hours per week.

HRT 201 Landscape Plant Materials I (3 cr.) Studies landscape use of plants. Considers ornamental value, growth habit, identification, and limitations. Focuses on trees and shrubs. Part I of II. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

HRT 195 Topics in Horticulture: Alternative Food Crops and Production Methods (3 cr.) Introduces students to alternative methods and crop choices for growing their own food or growing for market. Provides students the opportunity to gain the knowledge and experience necessary to successfully replicate class projects at their homes or businesses. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HRT 202 Landscape Plant Materials II (3 cr.) Studies landscape use of plants. Considers ornamental value, growth habit, identification, and limitations. Focuses on trees and shrubs. Part II of II. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

HRT 195 Topics in Horticulture: Annuals (1 cr.) Considers annuals used in the landscape. Includes site selection and evaluation for annual culture under various environmental conditions, taxonomic identification, and control of insects and diseases. Lecture 1 hour per week. HRT 195 Topics in Horticulture: Hydroponics (3 cr.) Introduces students to the general knowledge of water and nutrient relationships as they relate to soilless media. Examines plant/water relationships and optimum nutrition. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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HRT 205 Soils (3 cr.) Teaches theoretical and practical aspects of soils and other growing media. Examines media components, chemical and physical properties, and soil organisms. Discusses management and conservation. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 225 Nursery and Garden Center Management (3 cr.) Covers aspects of nursery management, including culture, plant handling, and facilities layout. Discusses aspects of garden center management, including planning and layout, purchasing, product selection, marketing, merchandising, and display. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

HRT 226 Greenhouse Management (3 cr.) Discusses the theoretical and applied practices of managing a greenhouse facility. Emphasizes greenhouse construction and design, environmental control, energy conservation, and related topics. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 227 Professional Landscape Management (3 cr.) Focuses on basic practices and techniques involving landscape management. Includes development of a year-round management calendar and preparation of bid and contract proposals. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 231 Planting Design I (3 cr.) Applies landscape theory and principles of drawing to the planning of residential and small-scale commercial landscape designs. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 232 Planting Design II (3 cr.) Applies landscape theory and principles of drawing to the planning of large-scale landscape designs. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 235 Landscape Drawing (3 cr.) Teaches students the use of drafting equipment. Emphasizes drawing techniques and use of media. Includes hardline and freestyle landscape drawing. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 238 Growing for Market Mini-farming (3 cr.) Focuses on development of a marketing plan for mini-farm items offered for sale to the public, retail, and wholesale. Includes hands-on experience in double-digging, planting, crop testing, and utilization of compost. Prerequisite: HRT 130 or permission of instructor. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 239 Complete Diet Mini-farming (3 cr.) Considers biointensive methods by which food can be grown for personal or family consumption, emphasizing high nutritional yield in relatively small areas. Focuses on the development of a garden plan that includes vegetable and root crops and grains used for food and composting. Prerequisite: HRT 130 or permission of instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HRT 244 Computer-Aided Drafting and Design (CADD) for Landscape Designers (3 cr.) Provides instruction in the use of computeraided drafting and design software for developing landscape plans and supporting information for drawings, such as dimension and area calculations. Prerequisite: HRT 231 or program head approval. Prerequisite or Corequisite: HRT 232 or permission of instructor. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRT 249 Perennial Plants (3 cr.) Considers the perennial plants used in the landscape. Includes site selection and evaluation for perennial culture, perennial plant selection, perennial culture under various environmental conditions, taxonomic identification, and control of insects and diseases. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 259 Arboriculture (3 cr.) Studies the techniques of tree care. Covers surgery, pruning, insect and disease recognition and control, fertilization, cabling, and lightning rod installation. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 260 Introduction to Floral Design (3 cr.) Teaches skills required for the composition of basic table arrangements. Includes the history of design styles, identification of flowers and greens, identification and use of equipment, and conditioning and handling of flowers. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 266 Advanced Floral Design (3 cr.) Teaches skills required for composition of traditional floral designs and contemporary floral designs. Includes wedding, funeral, and special occasion designs and the use of exotic florals to create arrangement styles, such as Japanese, European, and Williamsburg. Prerequisite: HRT 260. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 268 Advanced Floral Design Applications (3 cr.) Teaches skills required for the composition of large floral arrangements. Includes wedding, funeral, and special occasion designs for the home as well as public areas. Includes use of dried and silk flowers for special occasions. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 269 Professional Turf Care (3 cr.) Covers turfgrass identification, selection, culture, propagation, and pest control. Surveys commercial turf care operations and use of common equipment. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

HRT 275 Landscape Construction and Maintenance (3 cr.) Examines practical applications of commercial landscape construction techniques and materials used. Covers construction, planting, and maintenance. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 285 Management of a Horticultural Business (3 cr.) Studies the business and selling practices which relate to wholesale and retail horticultural businesses, including garden centers, greenhouses, nurseries, and flower shops. Examines planning and layout, suppliers, merchandising, maintenance, and display of horticultural items. Accounting and bookkeeping requirements, personnel management and hiring practices will also be examined. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 290 Coordinated Internship in Horticulture (2 cr.) Provides students an opportunity for on-thejob training in selected business, industrial, or service firms coordinated by the college for a total of 160 contact hours, regardless of the length of the term. Student commitment is 160 hours regardless of the semester enrolled. Laboratory 10 hours per week (if a 16-week term). HRT 295 Topics in Horticulture: Estate Gardens (3 cr.) Introduces students to the diverse management and design processes involved in developing and maintaining large residential or public gardens. Covers in detail different design situations with a focus on public accessibility, design elements, and maintenance considerations. Addresses coordination and implementation of the various elements that go into the creation and maintenance of large gardens. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRT 295 Topics in Horticulture: From Landscape Design to Installation (3 cr.) Provides students with opportunities to implement a landscape design. Through lectures, demonstrations, and facility tours, students will be able to successfully implement any landscape design. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HRT 295 Topics in Horticulture: Principles of Four-Season Landscapes (3 cr.) Provides students with the knowledge base to create gardens and landscapes with emphasis on each season. Covers the diverse range of plants available for use in landscapes, including rare, unique, and new plant varieties. Teaches proper plant nomenclature, cultural requirements, site placement, and the ability to distinguish the different foliage, texture, color, and habit of selected plants. Prerequisite or Corequisite: (one of the following courses) HRT 201, HRT 202, HRT 249, HRT 250, or program head approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRT 295 Topics in Horticulture: Sports Turf Management (3 cr.) Addresses the scientific principles for the establishment and maintenance of intenselymanaged turfgrass for golf courses and athletic fields. Topics include seeding, sprigging, sodding, irrigation, fertilization, weed identification and control, insect identification and control, fungus identification and control, drainage, and mowing. Also covers critical tasks for constructing recreational turfgrass facilities. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRT 295 Topics in Horticulture: Sustainable Landscape Design (3 cr.) Exposes students to the concept of "Sustainable Landscape Design" as presented by the Sustainable Sites Initiative. Studies the Sustainable Sites Initiative, which provides a strong foundation for understanding the requirements as related to site design for LEED certification. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT HRI 106 Principles of Culinary Arts I (3 cr.) Introduces the fundamental principles of food preparation and basic culinary procedures. Stresses the use of proper culinary procedures combined with food science, proper sanitation, standards of quality for food items that are made, and proper use and care of kitchen equipment. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: HRI 158 or HRI 115. Prerequisites: (1) competency in Math Essentials MTE 1-3 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent, and (2) competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of a college-level composition course. Students needing to complete developmental studies courses in English or mathematics may take those courses concurrently with HRI courses, if approved by the program head. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE HRI 115 Food Service Managers Sanitation Certification (1 cr.) Presents an accelerated survey of principles and applications of sanitary food service, designed to promote the skills of managers in food service establishments licensed by the Commonwealth of Virginia. Upon successful completion of the course, a certificate of achievement is awarded by the Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association, and the student's name is entered in the Foundation Registry. Lecture 1 hour per week. HRI 119 Applied Nutrition for Food Service (2 cr.) Studies food composition, nutrition science, and application of nutrition principles by the food service professional. Provides the student with a basic understanding of human nutrition and application of nutrition in the service of commercially-prepared meals. Co-requisite: HRI 122. Lecture 2 hours per week. HRI 122 Applied Nutrition for Food Service Laboratory (1 cr.) Provides students an opportunity to apply the concepts and develop the skill sets taught in HRI 119. Includes application of skill sets for understanding, reviewing, revising, scaling, and preparing existing recipes and the creation of new recipes with a focus on healthy cooking techniques, alternative products, and critical thinking. Co-requisite: HRI 119. Prerequisite: HRI 106 or HRI 128. Laboratory 2 hours per week. HRI 128 Principles of Baking (3 cr.) Instructs the student in the preparation of breads, pastries, baked desserts, candies, frozen confections, and sugar work. Applies scientific principles and techniques of baking. Promotes the knowledge/skills required to prepare baked items, pastries, and confections. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: HRI 158 or HRI 115. Prerequisites: (1) competency in Math Essentials MTE 1-3 as demonstrated through the placement and diagnostic tests or by satisfactorily completing the required MTE units, or equivalent, and (2) competencies in reading and writing as demonstrated by placement in ENG 111 or placement in corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3 or completion of a college-level composition course. Students needing to complete developmental studies courses in English or mathematics may take those courses concurrently with HRI courses, if approved by the program head. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

HRI 134 Food and Beverage Service Management (3 cr.) Provides a conceptual and technical framework for managing the service of meals in a variety of commercial settings. Studies the integration of production and service delivery, guest contact dynamics, reservation management, and point-of-sale technology systems. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. HRI 140 Fundamentals of Quality for the Hospitality Industry (3 cr.) Teaches quality in the hospitality industry, including material on the total quality management movement. Emphasizes quality from the customer's perspective. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRI 145 Garde Manger (3 cr.) Studies garde manger, the art of decorative cold food preparation and presentation. Provides a detailed practical study of cold food preparation and artistic combination and display of cold foods. Prerequisite: HRI 218. Corequisite: HRI 220. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. HRI 150 Introduction to Hospitality Ownership (3 cr.) Presents growth, development, present status, and trends of the food and lodging industry. Includes special problems of operating small- and medium-sized establishments. Introduces credit and accounting procedures, management of staff, marketing, advertising, security, personal attitudes, qualifications, and ethics. Prerequisites: ACC 115 and HRI 235. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRI 154 Principles of Hospitality Management (3 cr.) Presents basic understanding of the hospitality industry by tracing the industry's growth and development, reviewing the organization and management of lodging, food, and beverage operations; and focusing on industry opportunities and future trends. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRI 159 Introduction to Hospitality Industry Computer Systems (3 cr.) Familiarizes students with computerized information technology to manage information, support decision-making and analysis, improve processes, increase productivity, and enhance customer service in the hospitality industry. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 4 hours per week. HRI 160 Executive Housekeeping (3 cr.) Studies the housekeeping department with emphasis on organization, staffing and scheduling, staff development, work methods improvements, equipment, cleaning materials, and cleaning procedures; maintenance and refurnishing; room design; and safety engineering. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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HRI 190 Culinary Arts Coordinated Internship (3 cr.) Provides supervised, on-the-job training in selected business, industrial, or service firms coordinated by the college. Prerequisite: Program head approval is required for enrollment in this course. Laboratory 15 hours per week. HRI 206 International Cuisine (3 cr.) Introduces the concepts of cultural differences and similarities and the preparation of the food specialties of the major geographical areas of the world. Focuses on emerging cuisines as they become popular. Prerequisites: HRI 145 and HRI 220. Co-requisite: HRI 207. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. HRI 207 American Regional Cuisine (3 cr.) Studies the distinct regional cooking styles of America and its neighbors. Emphasizes the indigenous ingredients, as well as the cultural aspect of each region's cooking style. Includes the preparation of the various regional foods. Prerequisites: HRI 145 and HRI 220. Corequisite: HRI 206. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. HRI 218 Fruit, Vegetable, and Starch Preparation (3 cr.) Instructs the student in the preparation of fruits, vegetables, grains, cereals, legumes, and farinaceous products. Promotes the knowledge/skills necessary to prepare menu items from fruits, vegetables, and their byproducts, and to select appropriate uses as meal components. Prerequisites: HRI 106 and HRI 158 (or HRI 115). Co-requisite: HRI 219. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. HRI 219 Stock, Soup, and Sauce Preparation (3 cr.) Instructs the student in the preparation of stocks, soups, and sauces. Promotes the knowledge/skills to prepare stocks, soups, and sauces, and to select appropriate uses as meal components. Prerequisites: HRI 106 and HRI 158 (or HRI 115). Co-requisite: HRI 218. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. HRI 220 Meat, Seafood, and Poultry Preparation (3 cr.) Provides the study and preparation of meat, poultry, shellfish, fish, and game, including alternative protein sources. Promotes the knowledge and skills required to select appropriate use of these foods as meal components. Students will produce various garnishes, accompaniments, sauces, and accessories to produce a plated dish. Prerequisites: HRI 219 and HRI 218. Co-requisite: HRI 145. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS HRI 224 Recipe and Menu Management (3 cr.) Presents a comprehensive framework for creating and evaluating recipes and menus for commercial and non-commercial food service operations. Requires students to use microcomputer software to design recipes, recipe files, and menus. Teaches students menu engineering analysis and methods for optimizing menu contribution margin. Prerequisites: HRI 159 (or equivalent) and HRI 251. Lecture 3 hour per week. HRI 226 Leadership and Kitchen Management (2 cr.) Presents advanced principles of the food service industry by exploring modern leadership techniques, effective management routines, characteristics of strong leadership, employee selection and hiring, performance reviews, and career development. Lecture 2 hours per week. HRI 235 Marketing of Hospitality Services (3 cr.) Studies principles and practices of marketing the services of the hotel and restaurant industry. Emphasizes the marketing concept with applications leading to customer satisfaction. Reviews methods of external and internal stimulation of sales. May include a practical sales/marketing exercise and computer applications. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HRI 242 Training and Development for the Hospitality Industry (3 cr.) Provides a thorough look at training by addressing how to assess and analyze the training needs of new and established hospitality operations; look upon training and development as an investment; use training tools and techniques; train with technology; measure and evaluate training; and use different training techniques when training employees, supervisors, and managers. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRI 251 Food and Beverage Cost Control I (3 cr.) Presents methods of pre-cost and pre-control as applied to the menu, purchasing, receiving, storing, issuing, production, sales, and service, which result in achievement of an operation's profit potential. Emphasizes both manual and computerized approaches. Prerequisite: MTH 120. Lecture 3 hours per week. HRI 255 Human Resources Management and Training for Hospitality and Tourism (3 cr.) Prepares students for interviewing, training, and developing employees. Covers management skills (technical, human, and conceptual) and leadership. Covers the establishment and use of effective training and evaluative tools to improve productivity. Emphasizes staff and customer relations. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HRI 237 Current Issues and Environmental Responsibilities in the Hospitality Industry (2 cr.) Studies novel aspects of the evolving hospitality industry, including the collective impact of environmental stewardship and sustainability, local sourcing of products and ingredients, greening of hospitality businesses, cost-benefit analyses of sustainability decisions, and ethical questions related to these topics. Environment Sustainability Designation: Course content related to the study of sustainable development. Lecture 2 hours per week.

HRI 257 Catering Management (3 cr.) Studies special functions in the hospitality industry. Presents lecture and demonstration in banquet layout, menus, services, sales, and supervision. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HRI 241 Supervision in the Hospitality Industry (3 cr.) Provides a comprehensive review of considerations for preparing students to become effective supervisors in restaurants and lodging operations. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HRI 275 Hospitality Law (3 cr.) Studies legal principles governing hospitality operations. Includes applications of common law and statutory decisions, discussion of legal theory, and regulations governing management of hospitality enterprises. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HRI 270 Strategic Lodging Management (3 cr.) Presents lodging management principles, focusing on strategic planning as the foundation for operational effectiveness. Synthesizes management practices, which can be used by entry-level, mid-level, and executive management. Prerequisites: HRI 154 and ACC 115 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HRI 281 Artisan Breads (3 cr.) Provides an integrated study of both classical and modern bread baking methods. Focuses on craft baking, using simple ingredients to create superior products. Prerequisite: HRI 280. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

HRI 284 Specialty, Spa, and Plated Desserts (3 cr.) Provides an integrated study of specialty, spa, and plated desserts, which possess enhanced value through artistic presentation. Prerequisites: HRI 280 and HRI 282. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. HRI 285 Chocolate and Sugar Arts (3 cr.) Focuses on the study of chocolate and sugar as used by the pastry artist to create candies, confections, and showpieces. Prerequisite: HRI 280. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. HRI 286 Wedding and Specialty Cakes (3 cr.) Provides an integrated study of wedding and specialty cakes. Prerequisites: HRI 280 and HRI 285. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. HRI 287 Contemporary Culinary Artistry and Innovation (2 cr.) Studies market-driven culinary trends and contemporary culinary artistry. Covers contemporary nutrition concerns and special dietary needs; alternative business models; innovative plate presentation, flavors, textures, and design elements; molecular gastronomy; and preparation of traditional and nontraditional foods for modern presentation. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 3 hours per week. HRI 288 Health-conscious Baking (3 cr.) Provides students with an understanding of the ingredients and methods used in creating healthy and special needs breads, pastries, cookies, and other desserts. Lecture 2 hours. Laboratory 3 hours. Total 5 hours per week. HRI 290 Coordinated Internship in Hospitality Management (3 cr.) Provides supervised on-the-job training in selected business, industrial, or service firms coordinated by the college. Laboratory 15 hours per week. HRI 298 Seminar and Project in Hospitality Management (3 cr.) Requires completion of a project or research report related to the student's occupational objectives and a study of approaches to the selection and pursuit of career opportunities in the field. Involves field research and observation, independent research, and development of a context for assimilating hospitality management principles. Prerequisites: HRI 154, HRI 224, HRI 235, and HRI 255. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE HRI 299 Supervised Study: Capstone Study in Culinary Arts (2 cr.) Assigns problems for independent study incorporating previous instruction and supervised by the instructor. Provides the student and instructor an opportunity to work together to identify the critical areas of need in the student's repertoire. An individualized plan will be developed to address the student's weaknesses and to lead progressively to a group demonstration of critical skills. Individual assessment constitutes the majority of this course. Lab, lecture, research, and out-of-class projects will be utilized. Prerequisites: HRI 106, HRI 219, HRI 218, HRI 220, HRI 206, HRI 207, HRI 145, HRI 128, HRI 159, HRI 119, HRI 122, HRI 134, HRI 251, and HRI 224. Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 4 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

HMS 220 Addiction and Prevention (3 cr.) Examines the impact of drugs and addiction on individuals and their families. Explores the myths about various drugs and their benefit or lack of benefit. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HUMAN SERVICES

HMS 227 The Helper as a Change Agent (3 cr.) Teaches the following skills for implementing alternative models of change and influence: action research, problem solving, consultation, workshop development, and outreach and advocacy for diverse client populations. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HMS 100 Introduction to Human Services (3 cr.) Introduces human service agencies, roles, and careers. Presents a historical perspective of the field as it relates to human services today. Additional topics include values clarification and needs of target populations. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HMS 225 Functional Family Intervention (3 cr.) Provides an understanding of functions and dysfunctions within the family. Emphasizes the development of effective skills through an interpersonal/interactional approach to family intervention. Lecture 3 hours per week. HMS 226 Helping Across Cultures (3 cr.) Provides a historical overview of selected cultural and racial groups. Promotes understanding of group differences and the impact on counseling services. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HMS 121 Basic Counseling Skills I (3 cr.) Develops skills needed to function in a helping relationship. Emphasizes skills in attending, listening, and responding. Clarifies personal skill strengths, deficits, and goals for skill improvement. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HMS 236 Gerontology (3 cr.) Examines the process of aging and its implications in relation to health, recreation, education, transportation, meaningful work or activity, and community resources. Emphasizes experiencing the aging process, facilitating retirement, and application of the helping relationship to work with older adults. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HMS 122 Basic Counseling Skills II (3 cr.) Expands the development of counseling skills needed to function effectively in a helping relationship. Emphasizes skills in responding, personalizing, summarizing, and initiating. Clarifies personal skill strengths, deficits, and goals for skill improvement. Develops plans for achieving personal and program goals. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HMS 258 Case Management and Substance Abuse (3 cr.) Focuses on the process for interviewing substance abuse clients. Includes intake, assessment, handling denial, and ending the interview. Teaches skills for writing short-term goals and treatment plans with emphasis on accountability. Examines various reporting devices. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HMS 141 Group Dynamics I (3 cr.) Examines the stages of group development, group dynamics, the role of the leader in a group, and recognition of the various types of group processes. Discusses models of group dynamics that occur as a result of group membership dynamics. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HMS 260 Substance Abuse Counseling (3 cr.) Provides an understanding of the skills of guidance of clients and those associated with being an advocate. Examines the dynamics of the client/counselor relationship in developing treatment plans and empowerment skills. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HMS 142 Group Dynamics II (3 cr.) Examines group dynamics, group leadership, group cohesion, transference, and group helping through experiential involvement in group facilitating and leadership. Increases group skills through active classroom participation in group experiences. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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HMS 266 Counseling Psychology (3 cr.) Studies major counseling theories, their contributions and limitations, and the application of each to a counseling interaction. Provides students an opportunity to develop their own personal counseling theory. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HMS 270 Treatment Systems (3 cr.) Examines the services and facilities established for the purpose of treating addictions. Focuses on treatment therapy models and ethical standards related to addiction-disease theory. Lecture 3 hours per week. HMS 290 Coordinated Internship in Human Services (3 cr.) Places students in selected career-related human service agencies. Provides students with an opportunity to learn to integrate practice with theory under the supervision of a qualified supervisor in their designated career field. Helps students gain an overview of their chosen service career field. Laboratory 15 hours per week.

HUMANITIES HUM 100 Survey of the Humanities (3 cr.) Introduces the humanities through the art, literature, music, and philosophy of various cultures and historical periods. Prerequisite: Placement in ENG 111 or placement in corequisites ENG 111 and ENF 3. Lecture 3 hours per week. HUM 260 Survey of Twentieth-Century Culture (3 cr.) Explores literature, visual arts, philosophy, music, and history of our time from an interdisciplinary perspective. Lecture 3 hours per week.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY DESIGN ITD 110 Web Page Design I (3 cr.) Stresses a working knowledge of web site designs, construction, and management using HTML or XHTML and Dreamweaver. Includes headings, lists, links, images, image maps, tables, forms, and frames. Also includes templates, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), and publishing to a web server. Prerequisite: ITE 115 or equivalent with emphasis on file and folder management. Lecture 3 hours per week. ITD 112 Designing Web Page Graphics (3 cr.) Addresses the creation of digital graphics for web design. Explores basic design elements, such as color and layout, utilizing a computer graphics program. Prerequisite: ITE 115 or school approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ITD 120 Design Concepts for Mobile Applications (3 cr.) Provides skills for designing both web-based and stand-alone applications for wireless devices. Details discussion of the needs for applications, including mobile phones and a range of rich hand-held devices, such as PDAs. Emphasizes the importance of usability, accessibility, optimization, and performance to create fast-loading business enterprise applications and games. Prerequisites: ITE 115 and ITD 110. Lecture 3 hours per week. ITD 130 Database Fundamentals (4 cr.) Introduces the student to Relational Database and Relational Database theory. Includes planning, defining, and using a database; table design, linking, and normalization; and types of databases, database description, and definition. Additional topics cover the use of Entity Relationship (ER) modeling in detail through many real-life examples and practical business problems and solutions. After several iterations, the ER model captures the data requirements and business rules and forms a sound basis for the initial design of a relational database. The introduction to SQL allows for the implementation of a database design using SQL. Prerequisite: ITE 115 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITD 132 Structured Query Language (T-SQL) (4 cr.) Incorporates a working introduction to commands, functions, and operators used in SQL for extracting data from standard databases. Provides students with handson experience developing code, functions, triggers, and stored procedures for SQL Server 2012. Prerequisite ITD 130 or equivalent. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITD 134 PL/SQL Programming (4 cr.) Presents a working introduction to PL/SQL programming within the Oracle RDBMS environment. Includes PL/SQL fundamentals of block program structure, variables, cursors and exceptions, and creation of program units of procedures, functions, triggers, and packages. Prerequisite: ITD 130 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITD 210 Web Page Design II (4 cr.) Incorporates advanced techniques in web site planning, design, usability, accessibility, advanced site management, and maintenance utilizing web editor software. Prerequisite: ITD 110 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITD 212 Interactive Web Design (4 cr.) Provides techniques in interactive design concepts to create cross-platform, lowbandwidth animations utilizing a vectorbased application. Emphasizes the importance of usability, accessibility, optimization, and performance. Prerequisite: ITD 110 or equivalent. Lecture 4 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ITD 250 Database Architecture and Administration (4 cr.) Involves in-depth instruction about the underlying architecture of databases and the handling of database administration, including planning, controlling, monitoring, performance, trouble-shooting, and tuning of databases using Microsoft SQL Server. Prerequisite: ITD 130 or Information Technology academic department approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITD 298 Seminar and Project: Web Design Capstone (4 cr.) Provides students with hands-on experience developing exemplary web sites created with Dreamweaver using advanced behaviors and techniques, such as Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX) database connectivity, Flash with ActionScript 3.0, and additional components that students will select. Prerequisite: ITD 210 or permission of the instructor. Lecture 4 hours per week.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ESSENTIALS ITE 115 Introduction to Computer Applications and Concepts (3 cr.) Covers computer concepts and internet skills and uses a software suite which includes word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software to demonstrate skills required for computer literacy. Prerequisite: Keyboarding skills. Lecture 3 hours per week. ITE 130 Introduction to Internet Services (3 cr.) Provides students with a working knowledge of Internet terminology and services, including email, WWW browsing, search engines, ftp, file compression, and other services using a variety of software packages. Provides instruction for basic web page construction. Lecture 3 hours per week. ITE 140 Spreadsheet Software (Excel) (3 cr.) Covers the use of spreadsheet software to create spreadsheets with formatted cells and cell ranges, control pages, multiple sheets, charts, and macros. Includes typing and editing text in a cell, entering data on multiple worksheets, working with formulas and functions, creating charts and pivot tables, styles, inserting headers and footers, and filtering data. Covers MOS Excel objectives. Prerequisite: ITE 115 or school approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.

ITE 150 Desktop Database Software (Access) (3 cr.) Incorporates instruction in planning, defining, and using a database; performing queries; producing reports; working with multiple files; and concepts of database programming. Includes database concepts, principles of table design and table relationships, entering data, creating and using forms, using data from different sources, filtering, and creating mailing labels. Covers MOS Access certification objectives. Prerequisite: ITE 115 or school approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. ITE 215 Advanced Computer Applications and Integration (3 cr.) Incorporates advanced computer concepts, including the integration of a software suite. Prerequisite: ITE 115 or school approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. ITE 221 PC Hardware and OS Architecture (4 cr.) Covers instruction about processors, internal functions, peripheral devices, computer organization, memory management, architecture, instruction format, and basic OS architecture. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: ITE 115 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITE 290 Coordinated Internship in Information Technology (3 cr.) Provides students supervised on-the-job training in Information Systems Technology. Laboratory 12 hours per week. ITE 298 Seminar and Project: Microcomputer Applications Capstone (4 cr.) Provides students with hands-on experience using the current version of Microsoft Office in order to integrate the software applications to produce realistic business projects. Prerequisites: AST 141, ITE 140, ITE 150, ITD 110 or permission of the instructor. Lecture 4 hours per week.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY NETWORKING ITN 100 Introduction to Telecommunications (3 cr.) Surveys data transmission systems, communication lines, data sets, network interfacing protocols, and modes of transmission. Emphasizes network structure and operation. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: ITE 115 or school approval. Lecture 3 hours per week.

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REYNOLDS COMMUNITY COLLEGE ITN 101 Introduction to Network Concepts (4 cr.) Provides instruction in networking media, physical and logical topologies, common networking standards, and popular networking protocols. Emphasizes the TCP/IP protocol suite and related IP addressing schemes, including CIDR. Includes selected topics in network implementation, support, and LAN/ WAN connectivity. Prerequisite: ITE 221 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 110 Client Operating System (Windows 8) (4 cr.) Covers installation, configuration, administration, management, maintenance, and troubleshooting of the Client Operating System (Windows 8) in a networked data communications environment. Prerequisite: ITN 101. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 111 Server Administration (Server 2012) (4 cr.) Covers basic instruction in various network protocols, name resolution services, remote access, security, and print installation, configuration, administration, monitoring, and troubleshooting of Server Administration software (Server 2012) in an Active Directory domain environment. Prerequisite: ITN 110 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 112 Network Infrastructure (Server 2012) (4 cr.) Provides extensive instruction for the technical knowledge required for installation, configuration, administration, monitoring, and troubleshooting of Network Infrastructure services (Server 2012), such as NDS, DHCP, WINS, RRAS, NAT, and Certificate Authority to support the network infrastructure. Prerequisite: ITN 111 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 113 Active Directory (Server 2012) (4 cr.) Covers installation, configuration, administration, monitoring, and troubleshooting of Active Directory (Server 2012) components, DNS, Group Policy objects, RIS, and security. Prerequisite: ITN 111 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 154 Networking Fundamentals - Cisco (4 cr.) Introduces networking using the OSI reference model. Covers data encapsulation, TCP/IP suite, routing, IP addressing, and structured cabling design and implementation. Prerequisite: ITE 221. Lecture 4 hours per week.

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ITN 155 Introductory Routing - Cisco (4 cr.) Features an introduction to basic router configuration using Cisco IOS software. Includes system components, interface configuration, IP network design, troubleshooting techniques, configuration and verification of IP addresses, and router protocols. Prerequisite: ITN 154 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 156 Basic Switching and Routing - Cisco (4 cr.) Centers instruction in LAN segmentation using bridges, routers, and switches. Includes fast Ethernet, access lists, routing protocols, spanning tree protocol, virtual LANs, and network management. Prerequisite: ITN 155 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 157 WAN Technologies - Cisco (4 cr.) Concentrates on an introduction to Wide Area Networking (WAN). Includes WAN design, LAPB, Frame Relay, ISDN, HDLC, and PPP. Prerequisite: ITN 156 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 171 UNIX I (3 cr.) Introduces UNIX operating systems. Teaches login procedures, file creation, UNIX file structure, input/output control, and the UNIX shell. Prerequisite: ITE 115 or school approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. ITN 213 Information Storage and Management (4 cr.) Focuses on advanced storage systems, protocol, and architectures, including Storage Area Networks (SAN), Network Attached Storage (NAS), Fibre Channel Networks, Internet Protocol SAN (IPSAN), iSCSI, and Content Addressable Storage (CAS). Prerequisite: ITN 111. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 231 Desktop Virtualization (4 cr.) Explores the concepts and capabilities of desktop and application virtualization with a focus on the installation, configuration, and management of the virtual desktop and application infrastructure. Prerequisite: ITN 111. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 254 Virtual Infrastructure: Installation and Configuration (4 cr.) Explores concepts and capabilities of virtual architecture with a focus on the installation, configuration, and management of a virtual infrastructure, ESX Server, and Virtual Center. Covers fundamentals of virtual network design and implementation, fundamentals of storage area networks, virtual switching, virtual system management, and engineering for high availability. Prerequisite: ITN 171. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

ITN 255 Virtual Infrastructure: Deployment, Security, and Analysis (4 cr.) Focuses on the deployment, security, and analysis of the virtual infrastructure, including scripted installations, advanced virtual switching for security, server monitoring for health and resource management, highavailability management, system backups, and fault analysis. Prerequisite: ITN 254. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week. ITN 260 Network Security Basics (4 cr.) Explores the basics of network security in depth. Includes security objectives, security architecture, security models, and security layers. Covers risk management, network security policy, and security training. Includes the five security keys: confidentiality, integrity, availability, accountability, and auditability. Prerequisite: ITN 101 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 261 Network Attacks, Computer Crime, and Hacking (4 cr.) Explores in-depth various methods for attacking and defending a network. Covers network security concepts from the viewpoint of hackers and their attack methodologies. Discusses hackers, attacks, Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), malicious code, computer crime, and industrial espionage. Prerequisite: ITN 260 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 262 Network Communication, Security, and Authentication (4 cr.) Explores in-depth various communication protocols with a concentration on TCP/IP. Discusses communication protocols from the point of view of the hacker in order to highlight protocol weaknesses. Includes Internet architecture, routing, addressing, topology, fragmentation, and protocol analysis. Includes the use of various utilities to explore TCP/IP. Prerequisite: ITN 261 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 263 Internet/Intranet Firewalls and eCommerce Security (4 cr.) Explores in-depth firewall, Web security, and eCommerce security. Covers firewall concepts, types, topology, and the firewall's relationship to the TCP/IP protocol. Discusses client/server architecture, the Web server, HTML, and HTTP in relation to Web security, digital certification, D.509, and public key infrastructure (PKI). Prerequisite: ITN 262 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ITN 266 Network Security Layers (4 cr.) Explores in-depth various security layers needed to protect the network. Addresses network security from the viewpoint of the environment in which the network operates and the necessity to secure that environment to lower the security risk to the network. Includes physical security, personnel security, operating system security, software security, and database security. Prerequisite: ITN 262 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 267 Legal Topics in Network Security (3 cr.) Explores in-depth the civil and common law issues that apply to network security. Addresses statutes and jurisdictional and constitutional issues related to computer crime and privacy. Includes rules of evidence, seizure, and evidence handling, court presentation, and computer privacy in the digital age. Prerequisite: ITN 262 or school approval. Lecture 3 hours per week. ITN 270 Advanced Linux Network Administration (4 cr.) Focuses on the configuration and administration of the Linux operating system as a network server. Emphasizes the configuration of common network services, such as routing, http, DNS, DHCP, ftp, telnet, SMB, NFS, and NIS. Prerequisite: ITN 170 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 275 Indicent Response and Computer Forensics (4 cr.) Prepares the student for a role on an organizational IT support staff where the need for resolving computer incidents is becoming increasingly common. Includes legal and ethical issues of search and seizure of computer and peripheral storage media leading to laboratory exercises examining computers configured with mix of both simulated criminal and other activities which are not criminal in nature, but do violate scenario-driven organizational policy. Requires the student to make choices/recommendations for further pursuit of forensics evidence gathering and analysis. Students will select and gather the utilities and procedures necessary for a courtacceptable forensics toolkit which will then be used to gather and examine specially configured desktop computers. Students will then participate in a mock court proceeding using the collected evidence. Credit will be given to either ITN 275 or ITN 276 and ITN 277, but not all three courses. Prerequisite: ITN 260 or equivalent. Lecture 3 hours. Laboratory 2 hours. Total 5 hours per week.

College Catalog 2016-2017

ITN 295 Topics in ITN: Introduction to Windows PowerShell (4 cr.) Provides instruction in the use of Windows PowerShell scripting to automate the Windows desktop and server operating system tasks. Prerequisites and Co-requisites: ITN 110 and ITN 111 or school approval. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITN 298 Seminar and Project: Networking Capstone Course (4 cr.) Covers the use of advanced concepts and utilities with current network operating systems. Includes administrator duties, such as server organization, permissions and rights, and client side issues, such as configuration, troubleshooting, and installation of applications. Prerequisites: ITN 111, ITN 260, and ITN 171 or equivalent courses and knowledge. Lecture 4 hours per week.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMMING ITP 112 Visual Basic.NET I (4 cr.) Concentrates instruction in fundamentals of object-oriented programming using Visual Basic.NET and the .NET framework. Emphasizes program construction, algorithm development, coding, debugging, and documentation of graphical user interface applications. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITP 120 Java Programming I (4 cr.) Teaches the fundamentals of object-oriented programming using Java. Emphasizes program construction, algorithm development, coding, debugging, and documentation of console and graphical user interface applications. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITP 136 C# Programming I (4 cr.) Teaches the fundamentals of object-oriented programming and design using C#. Emphasizes program construction, algorithm development, coding, debugging, and documentation of applications within the .NET Framework. Lecture 4 hours per week. ITP 160 Introduction to Game Design and Development (3 cr.) Introduces object-oriented game desi